225

At my job people often will call me if I go to the bathroom or the break room. They don't need anything, they just want to make sure that I'm still at the office and that I'm not interviewing. This is... extremely paranoid behavior... I completely see why you need to leave. Phone interviews often have to happen during normal business hours. Do not ...


196

It's a great time to do the reasonable and explain that if the company expects to be able to reach you on a mobile phone then they should provide one. If they don't care enough to shell out for 50-100 USD refurbished android, problem solved, you are now free of using personal phones for work purposes. While I am personally not against doing a bit of work ...


115

If I say, "there were some issues during open enrollment, and unfortunately I was not insured once 2020 began. My only real course of action to gain coverage is to change jobs so that I can get something" will that convey a bad message to potential employers, that they shouldn't trust me and that I will drop the ball with important details? By stating this, ...


104

I'm resigning for ergonomic reasons and ideally I want to explain this at the exit interview, so they know it's nothing personal, and hopefully they will take action for others if they see that someone is actually leaving over it. Since it's nothing personal, is it professionally safe to explain my ergonomic reasons or should I just keep it vague ...


71

In my opinion, this is a one-off case, and the chances of this incident being repeated is slim (though, it exists). However, don't start to think negatively about this. You seem to appear as a very strong-willed person - not everyone can do what you did and achieve what you're achieved - thank you. Now, coming to the question you asked: What to do when ...


70

Segregate Work and Personal Phones A simple and best advise is to keep personal and work phones separate, and it should take care of most of the concerns which one may possibly encounter in scenarios like this. If your employer doesn't provide you with a phone/smartphone, just get a cheap/usable enough smartphone for work related communications.


68

No, do not tell your future employer why this is. You are basically openly telling your employer that you only want to work for them for health insurance. That is true of a vast number of people in a vast number of jobs, but nobody says it. When asked about the change after three months, say that you want a different corporate culture and figure out ...


58

There are a number of red flags here and you're right to be concerned and looking for a way out. Short of any legal action, and assuming you can't get around any of this, your primary option is to be open with the companies you're interviewing with (you're right to be cautious, given you have a family to support). They will respect that you have a job and ...


56

While the FLSA doesn't require or dictate sick time, an employment agreement is a legally binding contract. If sick time is designated and specified in the employment agreement, and if your employer doesn't approve or allow you to take sick time then they very well may be in breach of the employment agreement/contract. Have you considered asking that the ...


38

I also asked what would happen if I don't install the software (it has also been stated that installation of WorkSpace ONE is optional), and my manager says I can still use OWA to access my email outside work. My concern is that, although optional, there will be a time when someone needs to reach out to me after hours, and I will be faulted for ...


32

You asked, Is the truth the best option here? If you are considering leaving your (otherwise satisfying) job simply because you missed open enrollment, then depending on your circumstances, and how you would define "best," that's likely not the best option. If you have no dependents and are generally healthy, you may be able to get fairly low-cost ...


32

The moment you decide to leave a job, their problems stop being your problems. If they ask "what can we do in future to make life easier for other people who work here?" that's an opening to give them some feedback about problems in their building. But you cannot fix their problems. So you have nothing to gain from offering unsolicited advice. They've ...


27

I'd still say - do not go into details, give them a very generalized reason and move on. As you mentioned in another comment that when you wanted to discuss / report this issue, HR folks got angry, so most likely citing the same reason for leaving is not going to be taken positively and appreciated. There'e nothing for you to gain by providing any feedback ...


21

Tell them the reason you're leaving; it's a solid reason, and that knowledge may help them prevent future employees from leaving. However - don't leave it at that. If you're going to be honest and deliver some bad news to them, you should also deliver good news. Make sure they know that you enjoyed everything else about the job, and single some items and ...


19

they are going to make me pay for the background check out of my first paycheck if I am hired. Is this a normal practice? It's not common in my experience in the US. I have never had to pay for a background check. Nor has any company where I have worked required new hires to reimburse the cost of background checks. But I've always worked in the software ...


16

There's no PTO. PTO was promised during the interview and is in my signed employment agreement, but it's actually never approved. Same with work-from-home, it's never allowed. You need to log and document this behavior. Ideally, if you ask for PTO, you (and your coworkers) should ask for it via email or via texts. You really need to memorialize this ...


16

Schedule a general range and get agreement that it triggers at the birth of your child One member of my team is on paternity leave. He just informed our manager of the expected due date. I suppose tt depends on your job, but in our case, moving things by a few days had no meaningful business impact so that was sufficient. His child was born before the due ...


14

My concern is that, although optional, there will be a time when someone needs to reach out to me after hours, and I will be faulted for not having the software on my phone. If that time comes, they can just buy you a new phone/tablet. Either way, it's their decision, their fault.


14

Is the truth the best option here? Well, a truth. The full description you've given here makes you look irresponsible and doesn't show much interest in the new company. There are ways of phrasing it, such as "You offer better benefits" that are technically true and don't reflect as badly on you. But you should also look into whether there are other ways of ...


13

it was not a good fit, as I mentioned earlier. My body does not fit the workstation, I was going home with a lot of pain, and my doctor told me to stop immediately. It's too bad. I liked everything else about the company. That's what you say.


10

Here's the answer you don't want to hear. If the company you want to interview with cannot accommodate a call at say 8:30 or 5:30, there's a good chance they will be just as draconian about being at your desk from 9-5 as your current company. Cross them off your list. You will end up with fewer options, but a greater percent of those options will be ...


10

Copying your words: (emphasis mine) .... therefore I am required to inform them of all travel abroad. So do that, inform them. As you mentioned, you don't need an approval, so just keep them informed about the travel. You can mention personal reasons as the purpose of the travel. Whatever happens, don't lie.


7

Just wanted to post an answer on the legal aspect, because while I'm not a lawyer, there appeared to be a large amount of advice that seems false by some googling. First and foremost: Federal Law doesn't actually dictate breaks the company is required to give you. There are no federal regulations that determine a set number of breaks per number of ...


6

I doubt there is anything you can do Aren't job postings considered legal contracts? No, they are advertisements. Job postings don't even need to have a real job behind them. Plenty of companies post them to see if some star walks in the door. Inaccuracies are almost something to be assumed when applying for a job. HR refused to correct the errors. ...


6

It's good your company has started the practice of trying to control what happens with company information. If your phone gets stolen, they can wipe the company email from it to protect the company. Good on them. My company ensures this policy in a different way. If you want to install your work email on your phone, you'll have to accept IT can wipe the ...


6

There's nothing wrong with a sandboxed phone app I mean that in two ways. First, the phone "app" is sandboxing all the company data within the app. Presumably it's tunneling its connection through a VPN (because not doing so would be stupid). This means that no other app on your phone can surveil company data, because it's all inside this sandbox. ...


6

From your company's perspective, this is standard operating procedure for a BYOD ("bring your own device") infrastructure. I am typically on the other side, advising and supporting customers in setting up MDM (I'm a security architect). First, technical details: I'm familiar with a number of MDM systems, but not this one. But if set up in BYOD mode, the ...


6

The monitors have built in, non-adjustable stands, so they sit another 6 inches above the desk so the bottom bezel of the monitor is pretty much at eye level. This causes neck strain because I'm looking up all day. This looks like an OSHA violation. If I'm reading [the OSHA documentation] right, the top bezel should be at eye level, not the bottom one. I'...


6

The workplace I work at has a Social Media Policy, to help out with these kind of cases. It might be worth it to inquire if such a policy exists in your workplace as well. Just because you don't think it's offensive, doesn't mean everyone else thinks so as well. With a few clicks anyone could find out through my LinkedIn for what company I work and as such, ...


6

tl;dr - there's a surplus of people who have computing degrees, but a shortage of people who are actually good at the job. Prove you are, or will be, in the latter group. Your degree is not a passport to specific jobs, neither does it confine you to relevant ones and nor does having the "wrong" one exclude you from many jobs. Most employers understand that ...


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