129

If you want to get paid what you're worth you're probably going to have to change jobs. There's a 99% chance that management is lying when they say "they can't figure out how to do it"; with a 1% chance of general incompetence instead. Either way you're not getting it from your current employer. Very large raises, and the equivalent to 7-12 years ...


35

When it comes to wages, employees and management simply have opposing views. You as an employee view this as an individual problem, while management view wages collectively. From their view, giving you a raise could start an avalanche where others also demand more compensation - which they obviously want to avoid. One way to manage this is by sweet talking ...


25

Generally if your superior is making serious mistakes and blaming you for them it's best to find other employment. It's a serious danger to your reputation and peace of mind.


22

Some bosses are not really interested in how the sausage is made and will get bored and frustrated if you tell them all the problems in detail. Also... they are your problems, not theirs, so it's even more boring. You need to package your concerns in an envelope or languae that your boss can understand. "Boss speak" if you will. Don't make it about ...


22

Is it "normal" to pay you only enough to keep you from leaving? Yup! Even though that's not your question, that's what "normal" is, in my experience, in the US. I worked at one place, where, after a year in one department, I'd transferred to a new area. At my first review in that new area, my boss said, "this is all we're paying you? ...


15

Why wouldn't the company discuss internal staffing? If a manager is trying to fill a position and got a candidate from another department, one of the first things that they're likely to do is to ask the candidate's current manager what their view is of the candidate. They're going to have a far better understanding of the person than you can get from an hour ...


14

There are a couple of different options you can take: You can have penalty fees for late payment (which may be limited by the laws in your country). However, depending on the power relationship between you and the client, you might struggle to enforce these. You can involve a third-party legal/debt collection agency. A letter from them usually gets things ...


8

Would it be appropriate for me to suggest specific sessions for others to attend so maximize coverage? No. Think about why you signed up for the sessions that you signed up for. They are because they either are directly related to your work or are personally interesting to you. Presumably, your coworkers have signed up for their sessions for similar ...


6

This is more a general answer than a specific one for your case as of course nobody except those performing the checks can tell about that and they'll be under a strict NDA not to. Security checks take time, sometimes a lot of time depending on the level of the clearance needed and the background of the person being checked. For example for my clearance, ...


6

It depends on the company. Most large companies (and quite a few smaller companies) are self-insured. They hire an insurance company to administer the plan (things like processing claims) and as insurance if there are catastrophic levels of claims but during normal operations the company itself ultimately pays the bill. In that case, the company has an ...


5

I have 2 strategies when this happens. You have already used most of the first which is to push for timely payments. My second strategy (if I don't just drop them) is to double my price. I don't mind waiting if I'm paid enough. If you use this strategy, don't bluff, make sure you are prepared to decline further work.


5

Would it be appropriate for me to suggest specific sessions for others to attend so maximize coverage? If yes,how can I suggest, and remain respectful of my other colleagues individual preferences / interests? You can always ask. Make sure it doesn't sound like you are handing out assignments. Gather the group of attendees together and say something like &...


4

I'm going to post this from the management perspective. While I agree there are problems here, most of the other answers are positioned with the idea that what we read here in the text is all there is to the story. I'm assuming the position that I'm your manager for this. What I see is a senior developer who is currently incapable of meeting the requirements ...


3

In Canada, if the employer has pay grades, it is normal that salary is based on experience to a certain extent. Also, the two major employers (a hospital and the military) for which I worked had an establishment of how many people they could have in each pay grade. Something else my two employers had in common was a salary range within each pay grade. In ...


3

I could have been less rude, but it's impossible It isn't impossible to not be rude regardless of your workload. Own your actions here and don't blame others for them. You control how you react. You need to focus on people's actions, not their skill level. If people don't deliver, you need to escalate to the boss. If the boss doesn't care, you probably ...


2

Am I unreasonable to expect that internal job searches at a very large company should be kept confidential between the hiring department and the internal applicant, at least until a hiring decision is made? Probably, yeah. And why should you want that, anyway? Look at what has happened. It sounds like your manager is startled to learn that you're unhappy ...


2

First off, pay is never strictly about years, primarily it’s about position with time in grade being a secondary consideration. If this is a government and/or a union job, your manager may be correct in that there are hard experience requirements for some positions that simply can’t be overridden by competence. If it’s neither, then it’s likely that your ...


2

The process went through several legal jurisdictions, Virginia and Arizona. The lawyers may have taken a bit of time to untangle whether or not to apply Ariznona, or Virginia laws (Or federal) laws to see if you could pass a background check. Most likely it was the Felony that tripped you up. Some states are more lenient than others, so it may have come ...


2

I think it's perfectly reasonable to suggest a meeting with your colleagues a few weeks in advance, where you discuss sessions and schedules together. Especially if the conference doesn't publish recordings of (some) sessions. If you all go to the same session in a timeslot, hoping one of the other people goes to the other one you cared about, nobody will go ...


1

I think if it increases the benefit, it will be very appropriate. To ensure you don't sound like adding up tasks to others, the approach that I would take is approaching their manager, explaining to them the benefits of this conference if your non-direct reporting colleagues attend this. If their manager approves that it should be easier for you to suggest ...


1

You're giving them bills, those bills go to an accounts payable department, and then you get paid like you're a company. So either there is someone whose job it is to pay you late (i.e. in 90 days), or you get paid when a stack of other bills get paid. Billing them more often won't fix this, if bills get paid once a month (or every other month, or once a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible