171

So you have a job description that basically says "senior level developer with free reign to pick projects as they chose with the goal to improve and benefit the company". And you have a developer that picked a project, improved it to a point where it would make the company a profit of ~10 Million dollars a year and did most of that in unpaid overtime (i.e. ...


140

Let's flip this one around for a bit. Imagine the situation: You're the PR department for a well-known global firm A new hire comes along and wants to publish some research done prior to joining The new hire won't let you see the contents of that research The upside here is pretty small: it might turn out that the research is ground-breaking and the ...


79

Wow. The senior dev sounds like a complete creep. Are her weirded-out, uncomfortable feelings justified? Yes, I think you'd struggle to find anyone who would consider this as reasonable or normal behaviour. It's not standard practice in the industry - far from it. If (as a senior dev), I want to review work, I sit with the intern and we go through ...


57

Prior to this conversion they were paying a flat $20.00 per hour for your services. Now they're paying $20.00 per hour and additionally paying things like workers compensation, health insurance, 401k, payroll taxes, etc. None of these costs come out of your $20.00 per hour pay rate. The cost to them is greater than the $20.00 per hour they had been paying ...


54

Your description of the problem does not flatter Chan. I don't even buy into the line of argument that John shouldn't have let this confrontation happen, that was entirely Chan's doing. You're a company, and an engineer has just made you one of the most wonderful gifts, a proof of concept solution that sets out to modernize your tech stack significantly and ...


46

In short (based on your « flavor in your post » unless I read it wrong..), John shows the vision and focus to be trying to progress the company, while Chan seems to be standing still supporting legacy products. I would be supporting John with products & tech that are perhaps more future reliable and 16 months is sufficient to provide relevant training ...


45

First and foremost there is nothing in your question that even hints that your employer is asking or forcing you to give up your rights. But if you truly feel that they are, you should seek advice from an attorney specializing in intellectual property (IP) and perhaps an employment attorney as well. StackExchange is NOT the place for legal advice, only a ...


41

There is a difference, but it typically goes the other way. When you are a 1099 you pay both halves of the FICA and Medicare taxes. When you are a W-2 your employer pays half. Additionally, you typically don't get much by way of benefits as a 1099, but you do as a W-2. Whenever I've looked at doing work under a 1099 agreement, I've asked for 25-30% more ...


39

You are asking in a public forum with an identity that's linked to a public twitter account about how to do PR. That suggests that you are a person who doesn't practice the level of discretion that the average corporation would expect of an employee that deals with the press. Just because you have dealt with press before doesn't mean that you won't get a ...


33

I fully agree with the answer of @AdzzzUK. I am a team lead (male, senior), and his behavior is unimaginably nonprofessional. If so, what advice can I give her for the situation? Read the IT/security guidelines of the company. If these forbid such kinds of behavior, then report it to the IT/security. If I would be IT and I would learn that people ...


27

From your comment: If they found anything they didn't like, they would probably force me to change it too (otherwise what's the point of reviewing) The point of reviewing the research before you talk about it with the press is to avoid any surprises. Let's say for the sake of argument that you've invented a gravity switch that lets you effectively turn ...


24

No. Unless they are offering something in return, do not sign it. Withholding paychecks until you agree to additional terms is akin to extortion and is probably illegal. The reason they want you to sign it is to restrict your rights for the benefit for the company. They may say that you are just agreeing what is already in the contract. If that is the case,...


21

John seems to be loyal to the company (trying to advance the companies products in spare time instead of doing office politics), honest (straight telling you manager that you don't work on certain things is a risk, but honest), and defines a clear tool set which he sees fit. All of that would make him, IMHO a good technical lead. The real problem is that he ...


19

They want to record the call with the press. You've already agreed to them being "on call" so it seems to me that if they wanted to record the call without your knowledge there wouldn't be anything to stop them... (if I'm understanding you correctly) They are forcing me to take a press preparatory course (although I have dealt with the press before). At ...


16

They want to review my research (This is what really set me off). When I questioned where these policies were documented, I was met with a friendly "if you do not comply with policy, you may be terminated" email from the head of PR. Unfortunately I have obligations that doesn't allow me to leave my job at this time I'm an at-will ...


15

Covering a non-local candidate's cost to interview onsite for a full-time position is very common practice, especially in software engineering. Typically, the company you are interviewing for covers your air travel, rental car (gas) or taxi/uber, hotel stay and meals. You may need to pay everything upfront and submit receipts for reimbursement. I already ...


14

I actually did that. I worked remotely for my employer while spending extended amount of time overseas. However I had to quit as a full-time employee and start a company in the USA to make this happen, and, just FYI, setting all of this up to be a fully legal and workable solution was quite an endeavor with a lot of involvement from business tax experts. ...


14

I don't see anything amiss in what you've stated in your first paragraph. You're a contractor. You're not "entitled" to be empowered. Your job is to do what the client asks of you. If your spelling and grammar are lacking then either work to improve them or have whatever software you use perform spelling and grammar checks for you, or use a third party tool ...


13

Being an intern is all about learning how to function in an actual job, so I wouldn't beat yourself up too much over it. Making mistakes is expected, but you should also learn from them otherwise how are you suppose to grow as an artist and employee? Most of the time tasks are assigned with a tight deadline so it's admirable that you are trying to get it ...


13

Sounds like both John and Chan need a serious military-style "attitude adjustment" talk. If John is a smart as he thinks he is he should be coming up with acceptable transition plans for the company - after 4 years he knows the company, its management, and his peers well enough to know what's acceptable - and as a prospective "Engineering Fellow" he ...


13

You should report to both companies. As a security clearance holder, your responsibility to report foreign travel is to the government, not to a particular company. Your company's security officer is just who you work through to report anything you need to. Depending on your clearance, you are usually required to report planned foreign travel before the ...


11

1) Should I give the associate my SSN or is this a concerning situation? I would clarify what your SSN will be used for. But generally you don't need to provide your SSN until you need to verify your eligibility to work. 2) Can I still negotiate the terms of my contract once beginning on-boarding or is this something done before on-boarding? I find the ...


10

IMHO, NO Recruiter don`t need candidate SSN for anything during the service or after. Anything useful for you anyway. Contract negotiations should be done prior to contract signing, and "On Boarding" you describe seem to me like regular client profile building inside the recruiting company. I don`t want to be crude, but imho, there is no job, associate ...


10

Don't let your scars define you, either to yourself or to others. It seems fairly evident that you're (quite understandably) still suffering anxiety about your scars, and this (and the surrounding situations) is something that will take some time to deal with. I'm not advocating that you should ignore your scars and the issues surrounding them, but you ...


9

Is it possible to get a separate plan that or pediatrician would take just for our kids? Certainly. There is nothing that requires you to get your health insurance from your employer. You are always free to purchase insurance on the open market. That insurance could cover your entire family, or just selected family members.


8

A lawyer once explained to me that, because an exempt salaried worker may be expected to work more than 40 hrs without additional compensation, the employer can expect a worker to work around 40 hrs/wk, but cannot require a minimum of 40 hrs--meaning sometimes it might be more, other times less, but overall it will probably average 40+ hrs. ...


8

Several of these contracting agencies have told me outright they cannot work with me because pulling me away from my current role would damage their relationship with these large banks. For example, a contracting company I have never worked with before wouldn't even consider me for a FT role at a non bank company. Is this legal? No this is not ...


8

If things happen in that order, could I start at my new employer during that two week window? Yes, you can. Pennsylvania is a at will state, meaning that you can leave a company at any time and they can let you go for any reason. This works in your favor in that you don't have to wait X number of days before starting to work for another company if ...


7

Culture trickles down. I've seen this from the good side, and from the bad side, and I'm pretty convinced it's universal. So what your question is isn't "Is there any possible way to improve the situation before quitting?" It's "What degree of change can I bring about with the CEO?" Because, realistically, you're not changing the situation unless you ...


7

I value my time highly, and would prefer not to have work encroach on my other activities. Even before discussing this with the management, the question you should be asking yourself is whether you are willing to work at an organisation where such overtime work may be the norm? Your statement sounds a bit contradictory. On one hand, you prefer not to have ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible