203

Report this to your local fire marshal and let them handle it. As for the false alarms, unless your company is explicitly warning you before each test with specific date and time of the test, I would treat any fire alarm as a real emergency and leave the building until the all clear is given. If your company has issue with you protecting your life, I would ...


71

It’s probably not a good idea to retroactively bill them for more for a period you already entered and were paid for. You can, but they may say “no we didn’t authorize that” - and they didn’t. You’ve been working that extra time on your own recognizance up till now - until you got upset about getting paid time and not time and a half. Spite isn’t a good ...


43

There are two kinds of fire alarm tests: those that test the people and their response, and those that test the alarm installation itself. The tests for the people specifically require the people to treat it as a real fire alarm, whether they know in advance that it's a drill or not. The tests for the actual installation, however, do not require the people ...


32

Working from home temporarily for medical reasons has been a thing since long before the pandemic; even in offices that normally have a strict butts in seats policy. At a minimum, I recommend you drop this immediately. Apologizing for acting like an insensitive jerk would also be a good idea.


29

I would raise the concern with whomever has given you the direction to enforce the CEO's mandate. If no such direction had been given, it is not your job to ensure that every single individual is present. You said the memo didn't allow for any exemptions. Have all employees had their vacation/sick time revoked? If not, clearly there are some reasonable ...


19

What you're describing here is, to put it bluntly, very unprofessional and downright obsessive. Who cares if he works from home for an extra two weeks due to a surgery? Why are you so determined to make sure that no one gets any exemptions for any reason, even when multiple layers of management are ok with it - just to say that you followed all of the rules? ...


18

Yes, they can. There is nothing illegal about an employer asking an employee not to spread certain information to other employees. It's their company, not yours, so they can run it how they see fit within the bounds of the law. As long as you are an employee, and you still are until your last day, disobeying them is tantamount to insubordination and carries ...


18

Don't surprise your boss. So, you have a contract that states that you don't need to ask for permission before you work overtime, and also that you don't get paid time and a half for overtime. As such, you'd be entirely justified in billing the company for your actual hours worked. It's what both you and the company agreed to when you started work at the ...


14

It sounds like you need to have a chat with your boss about what your job actually is. From what I've read about "the job of an HR analyst", your job is to report on the behavior of people, not to try to force them to do anything. Managing their behavior is the job of their manager. The question ends with something that can't be answered here, but ...


13

Your employer can fire you at any time since Texas has at-will employment. You would not be able to sue them if they did, but would be able to file for and collect unemployment. As for the recruiter, they would only be liable if there were any confidentiality agreement in place, which would be uncommon. Your best bet is to slag the heck out of the second ...


11

If you have a pending offer, it is appropriate to mention that in the interview, and ask about their timeline. If they are very impressed with you, this allows them to speed up their process and perhaps get a competing offer to you. If you are just another option, they will likely not change their process, knowing they will lose you to another offer. If ...


8

Where I work a fire alarm test occurs at 10:30 on Friday. We just listen for the minute and take no action. Other times we treat it as the real deal. In fact the firemen get called out automatically. Why cannot your company do this?


8

If the fire alarm tests cannot be completely scheduled, e.g., there is ongoing work that might at any time activate the alarm, then ask your company to establish a fire watch during such work. Security officers walk around the floor inspecting for signs of fire. The fire watch has the authority to evacuate the building immediately. When fire watch is on, ...


8

Two things jumped out to me: significant management and technical turnover in team B teams A and C [...] perform the work of team B despite not having the bandwidth or authority I'm assuming team B reached a critical failure threshold and is no longer functioning, and is unable to fix itself due to loss of expertise. Given the dependency of A->B->...


7

What recourse do I have? None, unless you have a binding employment contract or are terminated for a reason that's legally prohibited (like terminating you because you're Hispanic, or disabled, or female, etc.). Texas is an "at-will" state, meaning: absent a statute or an express agreement (such as an employment contract) to the contrary, either ...


6

You have correctly identified that Team Bob is avoiding accountability by not leaving a written record of their behavior. However, Team Alice is not at the mercy of Team Bob when it comes to documenting things, because Team Alice can create a written record, too. For instance, when important matters are discussed face to face, put this in writing after the ...


6

I'll try to answer with another perspective. Look at it this way. The authority has decided that people should be back to office. Things are not happening as planned, for many reasons (someone being ill, amongst others). One possible conclusion (yours) is that people should follow authority whatever happens. Another possible conclusion (everyone else's, here ...


6

May my boss legally forbid me from telling anyone goodbye before I leave the company? No. You have already resigned. The worst that they could do should you disobey their request is to terminate you before your notice period is up. She repeated firmly that the company lets people know if I am leaving and I do not. That's what they would like, but in ...


5

On a practical level, you could tell close colleagues on the understanding that they keep it to themselves. It sounds like they are worried about you emailing everyone and letting the whole office know. So don't. Keep it discreet until you leave. It's very hard to keep this kind of thing totally secret. If you're friends with any colleagues outside work, it'...


5

Do as they say. Once you have left and they have paid your final salary, then update linkedin and email all your friends / colleagues as you wish.


4

“Would a pending offer make another employer less interested?” This seems very unlikely. I’ve even had potential employers ask me about other prospects. It helps them get a sense of how quickly they should be expected to move you through the process, should they decide to proceed. For hiring managers, this is an incredibly common ocurrence and it’s unlikely ...


3

The hiring process is like anything else, it is mostly self centered. How they react to such information will vary greatly even with the same person at the same company on a different day. There is no reason to reveal why you are looking for an abbreviated hiring schedule, so you shouldn't. Next time try something like this: "How long does it take to ...


2

I think this is not as complicated as you are making it out to be. If you are hourly you should be paid for all the hours you work. Forget about 1.5x your rate for overtime that won't apply to you, it doesn't apply to many if not most tech workers. If you work 46 hours you bill for 46 hours. Never cheat and bill for more hours than you work, that is ...


2

Team Bob has finished the non-UI half of the project and asks Team Alice to take over the UI portion OK, so Team Bob is finished their part. How can Team Alice deal with Team Bob in such a way that [...] Team Alice's product does not suffer at the hands of Team Bob? OK, so the product is Team Alice's product now. So what's jangling about in my head is: ...


2

Break things out using RACI charts. Responsible Accountable Consulted Informed Along with clear and concise deadlines and dependencies. Implement ITIL If you have Team Bob with clear responsibilities for delivering components on time, and clear timelines for what is, and is NOT a dependency, you can head off blamestorming


2

Here is the important question: Is this person your boss/manager? If not, why is upper management going to him to ask for bug fixes or issues? These requests should be going through your manager and/or scrum leader, who triages requests, creates tickets, prioritizes, and assigns them. You should never have a case where one developer promises something to ...


2

When He makes such negative assumptions, how do I firmly (but professionally) call it out? Besides calling it out, is there something else I can do to suppress this behavior in him? Directly address the behavior as it happens. If he snickers in a meeting again, say "Why are you here if you're not going to take this meeting seriously?" Same with ...


2

The honorable thing to do is to keep your promises. You need to honor the contract you had with the employee at the time that they quit. Having expenses is a normal cost of doing business. Imagine if the employee had taken a vacation day (paid day off) and then quit after that. Would you be talking about not paying them for their vacation day? No.


1

Letting an entire team go is a massive red flag. Product people don't just disagree with management for the sake of it. Also standing up to management is usually a sign of a principled team. Poor performers usually become yes men and keep their heads down. Also why hire this team if they didn't share a common vision for the product. This all stinks. From ...


1

You question seems to be around a performance goal that seems to be unattainable. If you tried forming a working group and that was unsuccessful, then it's time to involve upper management. They have the authority to restructure things. Team B is frustrated and overworked Clearly management needs to look at resourcing as it appears that Team B needs more ...


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