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157

If you have to go, then notify him and go. Explain that it is urgent, and is dangerous to your health if you do not go. If possible, give him enough notice so there is coverage for your job (if your job requires it). Make sure you have some sort of documentation that you have done this. If you don't notify him, you can probably be fired for that. (Leaving ...


73

Heck yes! Jump on it if you plan on staying there. You may want to clarify with them, but typically if they lay you off or close, or whatever, that's on them. They lose the money if it's something you can't help. Most companies when they give tuition reimbursement, it's to ensure that you will stick around, and you won't be voluntarily leaving.


62

I don't know what your medical condition is - nor do I want to know. Submit the request in writing. Use email. Get the response in writing/email. Document. Document. Document. Most employers give PTO (paid time off). You don't have to tell them why you're taking a day or half-day. It is none of their business. If this applies to you I would ...


54

What do I say in this open court hearing in order to save my reputation and keep my current job. You simply answer all questions fully and honestly, and give your side of the story. There's not much else you can do here. I have a court hearing at the end of this working week where I will discuss with my rival contemporary who at this point remains ...


42

Simple answer for him and HR. Quote the law to them. I don't myself live in somewhere with these laws, so I read up a little. On Wikipedia I found At will employment with these details: Other reasons an employer may not use to fire an at-will employee are: ... family or medical leave – federal law permits most employees to take a leave of absence for ...


34

I'm not sure what to do because I don't know if this is good thing. What happens if I get laid off or they close? Do I need to pay them back? Is this a good thing? Having someone else pay for your education is a great thing for both sides! (Here's a relevant article Why Walmart, Disney and so many other companies are paying for their employees’ ...


23

Is it my obligation to inform him or his manager of this kind of behavior? No. You stated in your question that the manager has already witnessed this behavior. Leave it to the manager to deal with. If his language or comments really offends you at some point, I would suggest telling your colleague yourself first. If that doesn't work then discuss ...


20

I do admit I did make subtle remarks on the status quo of females in the workplace. The first lesson is to not discuss topics of gender, race, religion, politics, ethnicity, etc. If you don't engage in these conversations then you are removing any possibility of your receiving any repercussions of these types of conversations. As to what you should do in ...


19

I'd give the boss the benefit of the doubt that he's not just being nosy and awkwardly trying to figure out what to expect going forward. Presumably, he's trying to figure out things like whether you're going to be missing more work, whether you're going to need to take care of your uncle on short notice, etc. He's not asking the question well but you ...


18

The thing I'm asking for is how to convince my manager to let me take time off. How can I do that? You can't. Your manager is a jerk, plain and simple. If he is willing to fire someone for going to the ER, he would have no issues firing you for something less extreme. Schedule your appointment, let your manager know that you are going ( in writing ) and ...


17

There is nothing you can do about your age. It's true that many employers will be reluctant to hire a 14 year old. There are plenty of reasons for that. Not only is there the issue of maturity, but also of your legal capacity. There may be tasks that you are simply not allowed to do on your own. As you know, there are restrictions on working hours which ...


16

That really sounds like it could be a scam more than a job opportunity, since they already had you doing some real work for free, as part of the interview. Or perhaps, as a comment notes, the 'come in for training' is the job offer. If they haven't mention what the pay rate is, then one way to approach this is to ask about pay: I'm excited about this ...


15

Your attitude in that meeting is of vital importance. You need to be sincere and apologetic. DO NOT be sarcastic or defensive, or make any attacks at all towards the complainer (if they are there). It's probably best to minimise your interaction with them as much as possible. Your general tone should be "I was making some general lighthearted comments ...


15

Don't just Don't use that fake info. People looking for interns know that you won't necessarily have much or any experience. They do look for skills and motivation, like do you play an instrument or do the electronics club or chess club or astronomy etc etc They soon find the people who are looking to make the most of the opportunity, who express an ...


15

I would be very wary and careful with that. The company is essentially asking you to commit welfare fraud, which depending on the severity can carry serious penalties. This is especially troubling because you're new to the united states, from which I assume you do not hold citizenship yet. Green cards, visas and residency can be revoked for welfare fraud, ...


15

Is this act normal? Generally speaking, no its not normal practice. Also, holding the company accountable for what was promised in a personal email would be hard to do. You would even be in worse shape in regards to under the table benefits should the hiring manager leave. Was I right to decline the position and further negotiations on this ground? ...


14

I do not know if I should go to HR First of all, that is not going to help in your case, HR is not your friend. What you should do is to Collect whatever proof you have or you can for the suggestions you made and were rejected earlier (before the architect joined in). Collect all the incidents where you helped the team to achieve their goals. Request for ...


12

The other answers are good advice — it’s important that you determine the terms of the additional compensation you’ll receive through tuition assistance. Have a conversation with a member of HR and be sure to address specifically: Is the tuition benefit a loan that will accrue interest? Is the full loan forgiven at the end of 3 years, or gradually over ...


11

This employee is taking a hard-line stance on their hours (recording every minute worked), while still enjoying all the flexi-benefits that are NOT part of their contract (such as telecommuting and working non-typical business hours). I'm sorry, but what do these "flexi-benefits" have to do with getting paid for time worked? An employee should be paid ...


11

You don't feel harassed by him, so there's no need to go to management about it. There's no need to stay silent if "the moment passes", you can simply mention it to him in a friendly manner: Hey, do you remember when you say X the other day? I don't have a problem with it, but you ought to be more careful about saying things like that these days because ...


11

Afaik in US you can't really "owe" your employer working days as long as you attended work (and even if you didn't attend, it's at worst be considered vacation/pto not owed). It depends on the contract about whether your company can give financial penalty for your "low performance", but most states' labor law prohibits employer to cut off your dated salary ...


10

It would depend on the skill and the exact duty, but if you've been doing a job for 4 years that requires you to do it even for 25% of the time, I'd call that 4 years of experience, and emphasize you have 4 years. The hiring manager might have different ideas, but it's up to you to sell it.


10

It varies. Also, I believe that you are looking at this wrong. First, laws about taking breaks and what breaks they have to offer you and overtime and so forth depend on what kind of employee you are, and what state you're in. Unfortunately, I couldn't give you exact details on this even if I did know all of the pertinent information. I am not a lawyer. ...


10

Per the EEOC and authoritative guidance from HR professionals, sexual harassment is judged in the eyes of the law using an objective reasonable person standard. What the term "reasonable person" means is whether / how an ordinary, rational person will likely interpret the conduct under those particular circumstances. If that person themselves found the ...


9

You can request a police check yourself (for a fee). Such checks are commonly required for visas etc. It looks like for an Indian police check outside India you'll need to apply to the local Indian embassy/consulate. The document you receive will have the details of the charge against you, or if it says you are not known to the police (as you believe it ...


9

Personally, I'd have no embarassment whatsoever, and may even consider it a challenge to make interesting noises. I would think the person on the phone would be more embarrassed than you. Not sure you can really do anything about people that are willing to talk in that sort of space.


9

A citizen is a citizen is a citizen. There are caveats, though. There is likely to be a fair chunk of time between when you apply for citizenship and when you receive it. It is a long and bureaucratic process. It can take literal years. The process of getting a clearance can also take a while. It can be 6 months or more. It varies on how overworked the ...


9

Is this act normal? I've never seen that happen. Was I right to decline the position and further negotiations on this ground? I was in love with the position and would have loved working on the projects he had lined up, but I'm almost surely confident that this is some type of ethics violation that could be considered grounds for termination if ...


9

The specific job i'm looking for is a ice-cream scooper One thing to note is that a lot of the questions (and answers) on this site concern themselves with folks in different phases of their life and career than you are at, and might not be helpful, and might be harmful, for the job you are looking to get. What you should be doing, is going to every single ...


8

What you're proposing is a form of fraud. Even if you get hired and work there for years, your employer will have grounds to dismiss you if the fraud is ever discovered, so this will haunt you long after the hiring process. If you lie in other parts of your CV as well (particularly around your education) then that can even become a criminal matter in some ...


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