81

I'd much sooner lose this job than go against my religion Would it be a good last resort to mention that I'm not able to do this for religious reasons? Yes, mention it. Clearly you have nothing to lose by stating your religious requirements. Remind your manager that you stated during the interview process that you cannot work on Saturdays, and tell them ...


78

I currently work in a company that has a workaholic culture. I'm only asking if it's unrealistic to try to have a work-life balance with a workaholic team once you're already in the door. And if it's unrealistic, to what extent? No, it is not unrealistic. For the most part I am able to restrict work time to 40 hours per week, give or take a few hours. On ...


66

The tl;dr here is simple. If you live in a "at will" state, you can be terminated for anything if the reason is not based on a protected class. Find a new job as soon as possible (especially because of your actions). The longer answer sucks, but I'm going to dive in to it anyways: You weren't unofficially demoted, you were reorganized. Things aren'...


59

If this in the U.S., it would be against federal law to require that you (a religious adherent) work on the Sabbath. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination based on religion... an employee needs accommodation of a religious belief that working on his Sabbath is prohibited https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/guidance/what-you-...


53

Initially, I added this as a comment, but I think that it warrants a full answer. The company is offering you 2 and a half months of pay, plus a month of health insurance. This means that they're also paying all the associated costs and taxes that you don't see. (The offer to stay on company insurance is bogus as COBRA takes care of this). In return, they ...


41

Would it be a good last resort to mention that I'm not able to do this for religious reasons, or should I just turn in my notice? Yes, by all means tell your manager the real reasons why you can't work on Saturdays. To be honest you should have told them this earlier (I would have done it since asked if I could work Saturdays), so they don't think that you ...


41

The problem with working 50-60 hour weeks is that it is ineffective. Not just inefficient, but so inefficient (because you get tired, make mistakes etc. ) that you achieve less than in a 40 hour week, at least in the medium or long term. If you have nerves of steel, then you can start in a "workaholic" environment, stand your ground not staying in ...


35

This sounds like one of the most toxic work environments I have ever heard of. Not only do you have your new boss from the sounds of things setting you up for a constructive dismissal, but you're also in an environment where a coworker would intentionally give you bad advice to further harm your standing in the company. Don't just walk, run from that office. ...


15

Yes let you manager know, and propose to catch up on work on a Sunday or after hours instead (not that I recommend over-time, but this is to emphasize that you want to work and help the team and not be seen as trying to 'skip' out.)


15

tl,dr: You are a goner there, but you may be able to get compensation for leaving on your own. You are clearly being managed "out of the door". For whatever reason, the new leadership doesn't want you there and I don't think there is anything you can do to save this. So your key question should be "what is my best course of action?". ...


14

If this team turns out to be a workaholic team, would I be risking my new job if I hold my ground and only work 40 hours a week instead of 50+? Perhaps. I haven't worked in many companies that had an "only work 40 hours" culture. In those companies where everyone worked extra, someone who chose to strictly work only 40 hours wouldn't fit in, and ...


12

Having worked in this industry for (koff, koff ...) decades, my position on such things is simple: "I'll give you my best efforts during ordinary working hours, but the rest of my life is mine." I found this out the hard way. (Long story.) "Quantity," whether we're talking about working-hours or anything else, "is not Quality." ...


12

In the US, this is generally just a sweet deal. You get a very nice cushion of severance, and some medical insurance paid for and then defrayed cost after that (COBRA rates are always higher). Fired (not for cause) is much better in most states for unemployment claims than quit, as well. If they do give you a letter about "mutual separation" then ...


11

I can't get any input on what management thinks is important to focus on. I've tried expressing this multiple times to multiple managers, but they always say they'll get back to me and then seem to forget the conversation ever happened, even when I bring it up multiple times. The annual performance review that many large organizations go through are almost ...


8

Low Risk, But Low Upside Generally, you won't be at risk of being fired if you hold yourself to 40 hours, as long as you are meeting the job expectations within those hours. As has been noted elsewhere, working more than 40 has drastically diminished returns, so if you are unable to meet the basic work requirements in 40 hours, you probably could not meet ...


6

Will a late thank-you note received as insincerely? If not, should I explain why I sent it late when I decide to send it? If yes, is there still a point of sending them then? Being grateful and showing it is never insincere or unprofessional; better late than never. I don't think it's necessary to excuse yourself as it would only be a few days that passed ...


5

Build your goals around the SMART model. Specific, Measurable, Achieveable, Relevant and Tmely. Look for a small number of goals - if you turn up with a list of 10 different goals, you'll miss most of them. Three is good - maybe one Professional, one Company based, and one Personal (oops - I've just seen that they've asked you to do that... I'll carry on ...


5

I've been at my company for several years, and lately I've grown frustrated and increasingly stressed out due to changes at the company. The quality and quantity of my work has plummeted over the last year, and ultimately I've decided to quit my job. When you talked to your manager and/or HR, did you tell them specifically that your stress and frustration ...


4

So I emailed my boss and his boss with my total overtime hours for this project and said I didn’t need compensation, just that it not happen again. Could I be fired for this? You can always be fired, although this one email is unlikely to be the sole reason. If your company decides that you aren't working the way they would like, they can fire you. That ...


4

As a midway point between the two extremes, it is very normal in pretty much every job that you might have a temporary "rush" requiring overtime. This is particularly true in anything which has a defined release date or deadline for delivery. In a large organisation this might only be an internal deadline, but it still may be important so that ...


3

There are multiple types of “IT” industry, and some may be a better fit for your skill set. Just some examples from my own experience: Pure software development company (or development function in a very large enterprise). In this kind of company Product Management may be a good route for you: a lot of the job requirements are similar to what you’ve done, ...


3

Absolutely, tell your manager. As stated in other answers, doing so will entitle you to protection. Your employer should not be doing this. Also, if they choose to remove you from your job, then on your next job hunt, you can explain that you took your religion that seriously. Many people who are employers will solidly respect that, even if they feel that ...


2

Questions: Will a late thank-you note received as insincerely? If not, should I explain why I sent it late when I decide to send it? If yes, is there still a point of sending them then? It probably will not be seen as insincere, but I would avoid sending it late altogether. Send the thank you note to the HR person that arranged the interview for you. Thank ...


2

The following is based on the experience with my employer, but I guess it is standard practice. When you work for a company it's usually specified in the contract that any rights on any invention, patent, etc. that you develop while working for them belongs to them. If you leave the company you won't be able to claim any rights on any patent you contributed ...


2

Overall that's rather complicated and also the actual practices vary a lot from state to state even between at-will states. First of all: any company CAN fire whoever they want at any time AND anyone who gets fired can in return sue for wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment, etc. What the laws really govern is the set of rules by which a ...


1

Restructuring is one of the signs of an impending layoff [Signs layoffs are coming]. They are maneuvering to remove you. Insead of simply waiting for that, you're better off getting another job ASAP and not mentioning your demotion.


1

Not sure why your management does not become invested in this rather common process. So perhaps asking a more senior employee who goes through this same routine for their advice would help. In writing performance reviews and performance goals, the general advice I received over the years is to focus on items which improve your value to the company and ...


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