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240

Is there something we could do? Having your wife report to you directly and sit in the same office (regardless of the size) is highly irregular in my experience and, sadly for you, a legit spot for HR to be concerned. I have worked with my wife in the past, but she was in a separate department and had a separate reporting structure. Also, my current boss'...


194

Lord forgive me, but I am actually on HR's side this time. Your arrangement is an HR office's worst nightmare.... Nepotism Fraternization Liability for lawsuits... Having a spouse be a direct report to her manager.... They are not engaging in sabotage, they are engaging in self-preservation. The myriad of lawsuits to which this makes the company ...


148

Your lack of education may or may not be hurting you. It would depend on the company to which you are applying. Some care a great deal about your formal education, others don't mind so much if you can demonstrate you have sufficient experience and skill. What is hurting you is the fact you are listing your high school education and then nothing higher. We ...


146

Ignore them... These emails aren't actually being sent out by humans, but automated systems that crunch your resume looking for keywords. The recruiters don't expect to hear back from you unless you are a match. The emails are generated by stringing the keywords on your resume, and inserting them on a form email. Then, the recruiter sits back and waits. ...


122

I'm going to go against the grain here. I'm probably wrong based on all the other answers and I'm looking forward to learning something from your comments. I'm also in the USA. I think this is no big deal and you shouldn't push back. Your colleague is a developer for the retail site. He could easily be monitoring the transactions and you jumped out as a ...


104

When a workplace is getting creative with the money it's a sign that unless you see it as a career company it's best to view it as a stepping stone.


78

It sounds like you already used your position to give someone you're married to a position at the company she may not have gotten otherwise, and now HR wants to make sure you two are physically separated to ensure she's working properly by herself. HR is protecting the company's interests. It is very nepotistic to have a husband convince a manager to hire ...


69

They're on the ceiling overlooking the stalls so you can see into them. So they're overlooking the stalls even when the stalls are closed? The law in Washington seems pretty clear-cut to me. https://www.washemploymentlaw.com/employee-rights/workplace-surveillance#1 I would call the police. Don't call 911. It's not an emergency. But find out what the ...


58

Accept the promotion, the increased responsibility, and the lack of raise. Learn the new job (probably will take 6+ months). Once you're good at it you can look for a new job. Note @Kilisi's answer From the comments, @crueltear may have phrased it better: Accept the promotion, and look for job elsewhere (1 then 3)


51

Check that the "multi billion dollar finance company" is actually your formal employer I am not sure where you are located, but here in Canada, there are a variety of companies pitching jobs at with "billion dollar companies" like "Morgan Stanley" or "RBC" or "Citigroup" which are not genuinely jobs at those companies, but rather contract positions. I got ...


50

First of all, understand and convey this: You have no objection with the setup, you're just not happy about the male co-workers missing out a chance to learn and grow. You don't need to necessarily fight the decision, you can also take the alternate route. If you're not OK with going to the VP of HR directly (which you need not anyways), you can have a chat ...


40

How should I proceed? Politely decline their offer and continue to search for a new company to work for. If the reason for requiring you to switch banks is true, this is indicative of a whole department (arguably the most important for any employee) that doesn't seem to know what they're doing. Definitely not a company worth working for.


35

If you talk to him outside of work, then you can do that and tell him a few things. What he did was a severe breach of privacy. In his position, he can be fired for breaches of privacy. If the company is caught not respecting people’s privacy it can get expensive. You are not complaining to HR this time and this time only. If you hear of other cases you ...


35

Backend developer myself, I regret it's not uncommon from developers that have admin access to a database to witness private information being in it. It's also likely that because the retail site is internal, the company had/have lower security and privacy standards about it. It is possible that this developer got you in a course of debugging something and ...


33

My failure results in the termination of the employee's contract... So you are essentially stating that your company and employees are so immature that they cannot act as adults in a professional setting. That your employer would risk an employment discrimination lawsuit based on someone's name sounding similar to an obscenity? Your name 'Bobby' is slang, ...


32

I would send him this email using your corporate email address: If you have a script notifying you of other employee's purchases, that is not ok. And even if you don't have such a script, or if your script was for debugging purpose, your message to me was still not appropriate either way. Do you understand what I'm saying? Please respond to let ...


29

You need to consult a lawyer and then the police. While I am not a lawyer, a quick Google search would HIGHLY indicate this is illegal. Putting a camera in a bathroom violates a person's reasonable expectation of privacy. Read this article from a lawyer in Washington state for more information. Its probable one or more persons will be facing fines, ...


28

Getting "furious" over this seems a bit of an overreaction - especially as there's a good chance your boss has simply misunderstood HR policy rather than being malicious. That said - it is also not uncommon for employees/employers to come to an agreement that the employee leaves earlier than their notice period when they are resigning, for various reasons - ...


26

I don't know if HR is sabotaging your wife's chances at getting the permanent position or not, I do know this whole situation should have never seen the light of day, to begin with! You got your wife the position, not in an "I'll pass your CV around and hope something sticks", but literally, got her the position. And on a new product, none the less, which ...


25

You’re already doing the right thing — looking for a new job. Any place that expects you to work 12 hour days, and tries to micromanage your personal life, is not someplace you want to work. Leaving at 5:30 after being at work since 7 is not “flex time”, it’s working only a couple hours of overtime that day. Just smile and say “sorry” as you walk out the ...


24

I have done this for a few decades now, especially when changing countries, which is the norm for me (companies are reluctant to pay expenses for me to fly for interview, often intercontinental). Normally, the team lead spends 29 minutes explaining the project and then comes the interview - "do you think that you can help us?". Two points to note: I have *...


24

Most likely a scam, especially if the company is online based. I'd review up to this point how you got the job. Did you go for an interview? Were you hired on the spot? Were all your paperwork done via email/telephone? This scam is common. A fake company has you do what seems like work, then they "pay" you with a check with very specific instructions like ...


24

Is expressing anger prohibited in the American workplace? Even though it might not be explicitly prohibited, expressing anger violently (even if only verbally) is NOT welcome in any place. Not even inside one's family. Therefore, not even "in the American workplace". The anger seemed reasonable. Specifically, two co-workers were shouting, not directed at ...


19

Ignore it, unfortunately it's par for the course when looking for jobs or signing up to recruitment websites. If you respond to them negatively then you run the risk of them not contacting you in the future even for relevant positions.


18

Do the math. Your company was acquired. Now come the cost-cutting and the downsizing. Option 2 is a lie. Even if you reject the promotion, you still won't get a raise, not a meaningful one at least. And even if you remain a low-level worker, your workload will increase anyway just to make up for the colleagues that will leave your company first. Option 3 ...


17

If you can automate it or make it really quick, send back a reply that is polite and isn't likely to burn bridges but causes them to waste their time like they chose to waste yours. Our time is valuable - arguably the most valuable resource we will ever have. Our time wasted by reading their email is just as valuable as their time saved by not reading our ...


17

I see this is in the United States. Is this a FLSA-exempt employee? It's important, because the Salary Basis Test stipulates that they are entitled to their full salary for any week in which any work is performed. Even if he asks for the unpaid day in writing, an employee cannot waive the protections of the FLSA. Granting the request could open a can of ...


16

Yes, your lack of formal education as listed on your resume could be holding you back. The Fortune 50 company you're applying to will have an HR department. HR is where resumes go to die. They will be looking for certain 'keywords' and if your resume does not have whatever is specified then your resume will go in the circular file. So what to do? ...


16

I think the short answer is you can't suggest or propose this. It is up to the employee to decide how they would like to be addressed. What you can do is put it to the employee honestly. Ask them if they are aware of the similarity between their name and some english profanities. If they are not, inform them of the details. Ask if they feel this is a ...


16

Wage theft? So you're not exempt and they didn't pay you for overtime? That's wage theft. Did you keep records? Do you have emails/call logs of them calling you or ordering work when you were off-duty? The Labor Department of your State can usually recover that money, assuming you can prove you did those hours. Negotiate What kind of machinery is ...


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