New answers tagged

0

You can't change the past. The people you defended your father to have their opinions of you and him. What you can do now (whether you should or not, because even if he is a jerk he's still your father, is up to you) is to not defend him in the future. Like if people start talking shit about him, just let it slide and don't try to defend your father as ...


9

What can I do to (a) make clear to my boss that I'm on the verge of resigning over these issues (b) that he has to fix this, with the solutions I have proposed to him in the past or with some of his own ideas. Your projected outcomes are unrealistic. Neither of these will eventuate. They're not happening for your colleagues, your predecessor or you. Your ...


37

my now-boss walked me through a completely different part of the office...His primary solution is to assign everyone less work to account for the "distractions". Your boss is a deceitful moron and deserves none of the respect and restraint you have so far shown. I would normally advocate communication and everything suggested by Sourav Ghosh, but in ...


8

In someways it may be better to just leave the matter and just conduct yourself in a way that that your (future hypothetical) children would be proud of. In fact you should be conducting yourself that way no matter what. However it may be good to reach out to some of the people you defended your dad to (e.g., 'Abe') Saying something like this: I ...


15

Healthy workplace == Healthy and Motivated workforce == Productivity. There is no two things about it. Bring it to the notice of your superiors immediately (this time officially, by setting up a proper meeting through email invite, for example). After all, it's your organization's responsibility to provide you with proper working conditions. If you ...


12

My POS father was convicted several years ago of possessing child pornography. If I'd run around defending him, I would be tarnished. Just because "it's your dad" doesn't mean people will think it's ok to automatically defend him. Your actions don't have to be similar, defending the indefensible is enough to tarnish you. We share our first names, so ...


1

I'm not too tarnished - only by association You're not tarnished at all unless your actions have been similar. It's your dad, the people who would look down at you for defending him are the ones with the problem. Especially if they know you. In fact bad mouthing someones family to their face is both unprofessional and potentially dangerous. I find it ...


3

Based on your comment about "They don't have the job open yet" it seems like your company has a HR or Head Count policy that will prevent managers from hiring anyone they want without further approval from up above. So each manager has a team and a limited head count and once its full, they either need to convince upper management to increase this quota or ...


0

You need to be aware of one thing. You said you are newly promoted team lead, i.e. the new kid on the block. It is kind of expected from people who don't know you as the decision making authority to question the decisions and ask around if what you are saying really holds water. Also, putting a recruitment firm on retainer to find you hard to locate talent ...


6

As with any proposal, you need to provide a business case as to why this should be done sooner. Why do you need this contract approved sooner? What is the business benefit of having this now? How does this save money/increase revenue, directly or indirectly? The value to the business of the contract and its earlier execution is what you need to be able to ...


0

Contacts, communication, building relationships, explaining your circumstances to those in the teams you need approval from. Also you cannot exclude your manager, usually you CC them in your communications, or at least your manager knows you are doing it.


2

I would always start with asking for work. Whether or not it should be this way, my experience has shown that asking for work has much, much better results than just waiting for something to happen. Not only does it show you as proactive, it also demonstrates an interest in the company and puts you in the forefront of your boss' mind. In addition, you have ...


4

You've worked there for 8 months so you should have an idea of the personalities and people involved in decisions and projects, and the way the company operates, but you have not been there long enough to be pigeon-holed into a single specific role. You are in an ideal place to be proactive in seeking new challenges. Look for opportunities to improve the ...


0

Just say "Yeah sounds good! We'll catch up in the future for sure." and then never talk to him again like most normal people do when they leave a job.


1

Recruitment is an expensive process, and many times, companies will hire a contracting company to manage this process for them. Depending on the setup, it could be a flat fee or a commission or any matter agreements that pays the contracting company. But no matter how the contracting company is being paid, they are not taking it from your pay. Contracting ...


1

How is any of this fake or corrupt? They're not taking money from your paycheck. They're being paid a fee by the company. If you let that fee come out of your hourly rate or your salary then that's your fault. The fee a company pays to a recruiting company is part of their cost of doing business. I don't doubt that they'll try to recoup that cost by ...


6

Do people in US work less than 40h (8x5days) a week? Is there a paid lunch-break? Some do. Some don't. Everywhere I have ever worked had unpaid lunch breaks. Usually that meant working 8:00 - 17:00 or the equivalent or more. Most salaried people I have worked with, work more than 40 hours per week.


2

I've always heard of 9-5 too and I live in the US. However, most "banker hours" companies I have worked for have the hours of 8-5, with one hour lunch unpaid.


-1

"I'm a W2 employee, paid by X company, but I work daily at Y company. X company is just a staffing agency" This needs to change. You probably shouldn't push for it to change immediately because you don't want to risk losing the job. Ideally I think you should start exploring options with your manager somewhere between 3-6 months in the new role. Do this ...


1

Terminology: You have the Client (the company where you are actually doing work) and you have the Shop (the company that employs you and rents you out to the Client). You don't say who told you that you couldn't be given a raise because "the contract doesn't allow it", but I'd bet dollars to doughnuts it was the Client. The Shop can't just unilaterally ...


5

I would say this is a great opportunity for you to be able to get some experience as a developer, and to be able to put development experience on your resume. In fact, I would say that if your goal is to become a programmer, this may be your only practical path. It's hard enough to get a programming job if you already have experience; trying to get hired ...


2

IANAL. This sounds a lot like she should consult a lawyer. My understanding of at-will employment is you can only be let go for any LEGAL reason more than ANY reason. I can’t say whether this passes the test to be considered illegal, but there are definitely components of sexual harassment at play where abuse of position is occurring. This also ...


8

Polish your CV and start looking for new opportunities. In IT industry with some skills and experience you will find a good job pretty quickly. If you want to stay at your current company, I would recommend to prepare yourself first(list a points why you should get a raise) and discuss it with your manager. Wish you all the best!


2

HR is never your friend. Writing letters will do nothing (and if it did... your friend would be unlikely to find out anyway). If your friend wants to pursue the issue, the only recourse they have is to talk to an employment attorney. They're the only people who can listen to all the evidence and determine if there's a case worth chasing. Grudges are very ...


5

I suggest she not send the letter. It serves no purpose and likely won't amount to much. If HR saw no problem with a manager trying to coerce a subordinate to promote someone he had a relationship with, they're not likely to care about the contents of that letter. She is instead free to post a review of the employer on various job boards if she feels it ...


1

I have known of only one situation were somebody had to quit the company for what many would view as a internal transfer. In that case there was a publicly known parent company but the two jobs were in two different subsidiaries. The issue was that the benefit packages for those two companies were vastly different: one still had a pension, the other didn't;...


1

I understand you're bored, looking for more responsibility and looking for a bigger paycheck. Software architecture is one road. Management is another. Increased salary and being less bored are actually not directly related to either of those. "Managing a team of software engineers" is quite often not the same as "provide leadership and vision". Places ...


0

Could it be that you're trying to make too big of a jump at once? Without knowing the specific role requirements, but going from a Senior Engineer role into an advanced management role sounds like quite a leap. I know some places expect their Senior Engineers to have act as a mentor to Junior and Mid-level Engineers, but this is not the same kind of ...


0

In this circumstance would it be more of a negative impact for her to send a letter documenting the sequence of facts that occured with the manager to the highest level of leadership? Depends on the company culture, the particulars of the industry, and the values of the executive that you're sending the letter to. It's possible it might do nothing, it's ...


9

The short answer is "Don't discipline him, reward him", but if you're going motivate him to move on, we're looking for keen engineers with a passion for learning. I'd be happy to take this problem off your hands...


4

I hesitate to add my own answer here, not only because of the good existing answers, but also because of how very divided people seem to be on this topic. But here I go anyway. Discipline Don't do any more than you already have. By not promoting this engineer, you've already basically bit the hand that's been feeding you hours, loyalty, trust, knowledge, ...


3

In some countries, it's not very uncommon. For example, in Germany, you are asked to resign before you get to sign your new contract. I had this two times already, one time for a change of working hours and the other time for a promotion. In both cases, I added a restriction to my resignation letter to just resigned for a new contract to take effect. It was ...


51

This is a huge, horrible mess. Promoting you to make you fail is called constructive termination ... And it's the oldest trick in the book. A company can't get someone to quit, and can't lay them off (for some reason). So they setup the employee to fail. they send him out on an urgent job with a minor piece of safety equipment broken, then fire him for ...


0

I've seen situations like this before. What you can do is a little bit of malicious compliance. If they want to make you travel, they can, but you can also refuse to work over 40 hours. If it takes you an hour out of your way each way, then 8-2 = six hours at the client site. If they want you to spend more time, then they can work out arrangements with ...


2

It seems to be as this is an indirect way of forcing untracked labor. Is this legal? Untracked labor? Yes. With very few exceptions, there are no laws requiring that a company track labor at all, other than for payroll purposes. Ask your employer what they would like you to enter for the travel time, if anything. If instead, you are trying to say that ...


4

How can we approach human resources to stop this bullying behavior, or get him to automate stuff that isn't our work exclusively? You don't. This employee is not exhibiting any bullying behavior, he is simply doing his job and doing it well enough to have some others worried apparently. If you approach HR with this "problem" you will only hurt your ...


2

We used to say that "Just cause" really means "Just 'cause we felt like it". The simple fact is that businesses have been at this for a long time, and put so many rules in the employee handbooks that you are always violating some policy or other. At any time, all they have to do is compile a list of violations, and then terminate you for cause.


5

To be fired for-cause requires generally the satisfaction of one or many criteria including: Dishonesty (including theft, fraud, deception and breach of trust) Conflicts of interest Inappropriate relationship (with boss, junior employee) Insolence or insubordination (disobeying a boss, acting rude or abrasive) Breach of important rules or policies Theft or ...


33

Can you be promoted and then fired for-cause? The "for-cause" part in the US is mostly irrelevant. Almost all states have "at will" employment so you can leave or be terminated for any or no reason at any time. In the US there are far easier and direct ways to get rid of an unwanted employee than staging a mock promotion. This being said, it's a pretty ...


11

Instead of working him out of the company, put him on a "fast track" or "talent programme" or some such. Give him a schedule of things that he must achieve - some of those will be raw qualifications (eg. sit the company's "new managers" training course), and others will be experiences like "come up with a training presentation and invite people to come" (to ...


4

It is not possible to promote an employee without their acceptance. If the employee accepts the promotion, they are responsible for the (new)tasks they have to do. Then, if they are under-performing or whatever, the company can(should) fire/replace them. If someone is getting promoted, it doesn't just mean better benefits/salary, but also harder problems ...


3

With great (any new) power, comes great (newer) responsibilities. Someone can be very good at doing something (existing responsibilities), but not good at doing something else (the new ones). If the new job requires something new to be done, which the promoted employee cannot seem to manage, eventually the company needs to find a replacement. That is why, ...


9

how can you switch jobs and jump into a management / software architect position You apply for those sorts of positions. And it's correct that often it's best to switch companies. Perhaps invest in yourself, take a management course, two major benefits to this are that you learn whats involved, and you get a fancy certificate. Management is a skill like ...


4

I have read through the answers and comments. I don't see any mention of this engineers ability to deliver work as required nor any mention of an ability to mentor others in his group and pass on his knowledge. Unless I am missing something, this person could be brilliant in becoming conversant with yet another new, novel technology. Yet in most cases what ...


25

Based on the details in the linked question, your division lead, "Chan", acted against his employer's interests in order to ensure his team continues to be paid for work that (based on the information available) is easily automated (how can a team of 200 developers be replaced with a script? Is the company that inefficient?). Also, your division lead sounds ...


7

You can't stop Automation. When automation occurs in general, its aimed at increasing productivity by removing easy and repetitive tasks and allowing an employee to focus on more important work. If its the case that these automation procedures are being targeted at making people redundant, I would go back and look at any team which are under performing or ...


2

This is very unusual in my experience. I'm in the US, but not in Texas, and I've never heard of a situation where a company asks you to resign to take another position in the same company. I've certainly never heard of requiring someone to resign just to pursue such another position within the company. Having done it myself, I'll say that the normal ...


12

Note: this answer assumes the employee only has 4 years of experience (based on the question wording) without much leadership experience yet. Experience and technical chops / productivity aren't the same thing The employee in question sounds a lot like me when I first started out, though I wasn't as much of a technical superstar, nor did I resort to ...


8

I happen to think your three-year waiting period accomplished its purpose in this case. You need someone whose work ethic is sustainable, not someone who deflates at short-term setbacks. You wouldn't have discovered that about this person without the waiting period, until it was too late. If this person had reacted differently by continuing on unabated, I ...


-2

If you want him to leave on his own accord (to avoid the 700k severance), introduce him to self-employed software engineers – with their mentoring he will see he there is a whole new world out there which is better suited to his skills and risk appetite


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