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0

My advice to you would be to find a company that's a leader in the field, that's big enough to also have jobs that have your current skillset. Work for the new company in your current role, as you learn, and through mentorship within, transition smoothly to the new domain (over a period of 5-8 years). Also, gain the proper formal education and credentials as ...


-1

While it's tempting to leave the job for a dream job, you would be leaving for something that is a minor shift (Web Developer to Machine learning) and spend several months to pursue a ML course. This is what someone inexperienced would do and it would be a double edged sword: let's say that in 7 months you would learn ML, your knowledge in web development ...


2

TLDR: It makes you look foolish Instead of quitting a job to study, take classes part-time than transition within your organization to a ML position. Failing that, interview with companies that are transitioning to a more ML approach, and THEN transition over, but do not ever quit a job to go to school. If I were to see a resume where someone left to go to ...


11

The thing with self-taught skills that completely lack any context to measure their success is that, well, there's no way to gauge them. So the less overlap there is between your established education/work experience and your new field there is the bigger step back you're going to end up taking. Sure you can do skills interviews and tests but they're going ...


1

You should consider yourself lucky if you manage to get any developer job in this domain, nevermind if it is entry level. And the only way you can mitigate the fact that you will be unemployed while looking for a new job is by enrolling in some kind of real world study program before, preferably with some sort of certificate you get. Maybe some companies ...


1

Many US companies are indeed advertising remote-only positions that require you to be a US citizen, permanent resident or in possession of a valid work visa like H1-B or F1/OPT. In the age of COVID the vast majority of positions that could be done remotely are effectively remote-only until further notice, so this applies to a huge chunk of job postings out ...


1

My personal short version: Senior developers handles any problems that come up without having to ask anyone for help (of course they will ask for help if they know someone else solved a problem before). Mid-level developers handle everything they can reliably and without asking for help. If something is too difficult they go to a senior developer. Something ...


2

Where do companies draw the line between entry-, mid-,senior- etc. level developers? Wherever they want to. The entry positions are mostly the same in all companies, but moving into mid-, senior roles, the variations become quite high. What some consider a senior, others might consider a mid-. As already mentioned in the existing answer, you need to look at ...


6

How does one know if they qualify for a senior-level position? Mid-level? Any other level (other than entry-level) that I failed to mention? Don't focus on the job title, you need to carefully read the job requirements/description. Every company has different qualifications for the different tiers for a given job title. You need to carefully read the job ...


6

It is very rare for US employees to have an actual employment contract, so don't expect them to offer you one just because you are remote. Virtually all exempt employment here is "at-will," meaning they can fire you whenever they want (there are limits). Exempt means exempt from federal wage and labor laws that apply to hourly employees. I have ...


2

Maybe but if they broke the contract are you going to hire a lawyer in another country to pursue a case? And if that's unlikely then it's not so much about whether it's legal or not but do you trust them. I wouldn't feel comfortable doing work for a company that says it doesn't give written contracts. I've worked for international companies and they sent me ...


2

Will I have to pay taxes? Yes. You will also have to pay into social security, unemployment and several other program which normally come out of your check. And if I leave in the middle of September will I be exempt from paying any taxes since I wouldn’t have worked for very long? You've worked for him since May, that's 5 months. That's a long time ...


0

Not sure regarding your industry and job, would help to better pinpoint the answer, and it seems you are a colleague, not a supervisor, but If it is not on a time-sheet, the only time it can be concerning if he get injured during this time and submit worker compensation claim. As i see it , it may be an issue of commute. I myself had jobs where there was ...


0

Have you spoken to your colleague? I suggest asking him why he prefers to start early. (Although another answer indicates that this is offensive, it would be normal lunchtime conversation in my geography.) Two of my team members, my partner and her dad all share this same proclivity: They do not leave any earlier than their colleagues, but they arrive much ...


-4

First thing you should talk to a tax and employment lawyer. There may be free ones, but in any way you need to know what you are dealing with. In Canada, for example, even if you are not considered employee by your "employer", under specific conditions he actually is and required to pay at least employer part of taxes.


15

Regardless of a Form W-4 or not, regardless of whether your employer withholds taxes or not, you are still responsible for any income taxes that may be due as a result of your income. Now depending on how much you make during the year, you may or may not owe taxes since those in lower income brackets may be exempt from income tax but you will still need to ...


5

If you finish at 8PM then you should be able to organise these activities for the mornings before work. Which would negate the need to create any drama at work. It's normally a good idea to separate your work from your personal issues whenever possible. This is perhaps why your supervisor is annoyed. If it can't be arranged which seems unlikely, then just ...


1

Without background, leaving early for 7 days sounds excessive, but I don't know the situation. Is there any way to cut back on that to make room for the ultrasound, it'd be recommended. You'll have more opportunity to shave off time in a 7-day run than you will in a 1-day event, that may garner flexibility from the boss for the ultrasound. Making up the time ...


3

Learn a bit about negotiation. It'll be useful for the rest of your life. I'd start with something like, "I'm about to make you really frustrated. You'll think I'm making unreasonable demands, in light of what I've already asked of you. "I have been granted early leave for seven days. This is already very generous of you. I understand what a tough ...


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