New answers tagged

1

On overtime Stack Overflow's developer survey 2020 asked a question about overtime and the result was that around a quarter of respondents often worked overtime 1-2 days a week or more. It's not the average situation to be working multiple hours of overtime every day. On the meeting This is situational. Software development is a diverse field. At one ...


0

Probably not. It depends on the state. "However, 29 states and the District of Columbia do prohibit discrimination based on legal activities outside the workplace, which includes smoking tobacco." Taken from https://www.workplacefairness.org/smoking-rights-workplace


0

... how did you handle a coworker ... Unless you are applying for a management position, who gets hired is none of your business. ... I could make up a story to answer the interview question ... No. All you have to answer is you will do your works, and ignore your disabled coworker. You do nothing until the company terminates your coworker.


-1

I personally have never heard this question in a job interview. However, my idea is that if someone would ask this question they would love to hear a story about how you stepped up and helped this colleague be a more productive worker, by training him/her, explaining things to him/her, helping him/her prioritizing tasks etc.


2

You don’t mention the country. In most countries you get paid for the hours you work. In the USA, you can have exempt status, meaning you have to work more hours for the needs of the business. Since management could hire more people, there is no business need. Management trying to exploit the employees doesn’t create a business need. I suggest that ...


2

This question only makes sense if you're interviewing for a position in management. Otherwise, if you're an individual contributor, the only reasonable thing to do about an underperforming colleague is to discuss the situation with your manager - they're the one responsible for solving this problem. It's great that you've empathized with a colleague with a ...


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Make up a story The kind of people who infest HR departments want to hear about how you empathized with the co-worker, helped them through cancer, and baked some cookies to ensure they had money for their chemo. There is a correct answer for this sort of thing and there is no way to verify the story. Idk why people care about honesty hwere as it is insane. ...


3

Firstly, their verbal reasoning is a bit misguided. They said that because everybody is working from home, my home counts as my office while I'm working. What they should have said was: When you are representing the company you must follow company rules. Smoking while on the job during a visual meeting never-the-less is certainly jarring for the ...


-2

In the US, it would be completely, totally normal and legally acceptable that a company might have a policy: "You may not smoke while on video calls." However. It sounds like they have never told you this policy and indeed they probably do not have such a policy. Your email response should be: "Hello. Immediately completely remove the reprimand from ...


43

I am rabidly anti-smoking, but I find their argument, as presented, absurd. To say that your office is a smoke-free workplace and since you are now working from home, your home is the office is outrageous. Offices have non-smoking policies in their buildings to avoid polluting the indoor air in the workplace, and I'm glad they do. Back in the 1980's I ...


4

Instead of smoking, let's suppose you were assembling a Lego puzzle while on video call. Would it be acceptable? It does not matter what you were doing if it was not work related. Eating, drinking, watching TV. They just found a legal reason to go after you in this case. Trust me, they will find legal explanation for issues no matter how small, that do not ...


0

Your employer is in a position to forbid or require you doing one thing or another (within reasonable limits - like to wear an uniform, not to use tobacco, alcohol or drugs, not to swear, to speak only some specified language, etc) in office hours, no matter where exactly you are (you may be on a field trip, and the place may be an actual field). In my ...


83

You also were naked at the office slept overnight at the office and possibly made an overly fragrant lunch at the office brought your pet to the office had sex or masturbated at the office The argument that context doesn't matter is clearly absurd. None of the reasons they presented to you make any sense. (some people in the comments pointed out some ...


3

Another possible aspect might be health and safety at work. I think some of the recent legislation has been to protect employees from the dangers of smoke while working. This applies obviously to table staff in pubs etc but probably applies to any working environment. In this case, the company is employing you to do work and if you were to become ill due to ...


27

Can a company really get me in trouble for this? Depending on your State and contract yes this could get you in trouble, and they could fire you if the laws apply. Check your local laws and contract to be sure. I also suggest you check your employee's handbook to see what are the politics about smoking. Is this actually a thing? Well... they sent you ...


110

Is this actually a thing? Can a company really get me in trouble for this? Since you are living and working in the US, yes they can. Chances are, they can fire you for any reason or none at all (depending on your local state laws). Their "your home is our office" argument is absurd, but being a smoker is not a protected class and doing it on company time, ...


13

I can think of two reasons why they are completely justified in their reprimand: You receive any amount of "home office" materials/technologies/reimbursement: Yes, your computer you work on, your internet connection, and maybe even the room itself may be "theirs" in a loose sense if you take their money each month as a reimbursement for having your own ...


5

Is this actually a thing? Can a company really get me in trouble for this? There may not be a right or wrong answer for this. Or maybe this isn't even written in any rulebook. But we are also currently living in an unusual time. In this situation, I think the best approach would be to own it up and ensure to the HR and everyone else involved to make sure ...


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It must be said that you plan to give most of your time to training in the company. This kind of training will yield much more results, because you will be able to see the specifics of working in this company, rather than the abstract skills that you would receive in an educational institution. In this way, you will show what you want to learn and that is a ...


0

I work in company A through recruitment agency B. I want to ask for a wage raise. Who do I need to ask it? You ask your manager at agency B for a raise. They pay your wages. They are the only ones in a position to change your salary.


0

You have an arrangement with company B. Company B has a contract with company A. Depending on how the management and budgeting in Company A is done the person who manages your time has no idea how much company A is paying per hour to have you work on their project. They definitely have no idea how much an hour you see in your check after benefits, taxes, ...


6

Should Citizens & Green Card holders lie about their visa status on job applications? No. Don't lie. Most employers prefer not to offer jobs to liars.


2

If I hired someone who lied about anything on their resume they would be terminated the moment I found out. For something this important, even if I was sponsoring visas for openings, if someone lied about the need during the hiring process and then requested a sponsorship after getting hired, they would be immediately terminated and walked out of the ...


10

In short, because you're using a company asset to promote the workplace of a different company. Like you said in your post, you were aware of where your coworkers were going through personal conversations. Which is generally just fine (though you don't want to stray into "Dude, you should check out how great it is over there - they still have openings, you ...


3

You talk to the people who pay you. Which will probably be company B - they'll invoice company A for you, but your contract is with B, even if you turn up at company A each day to work. It's written in your contract.


4

I have been in a similar situation in the past. The contract in Virginia was coming to an end. The company gave us two weeks notice, and then after that point they would only pay for insurance for a month. After that we were terminated. I had a coworker that found a new job during the two weeks notice, the let him go the same day he told them. Now he had an ...


4

Is it necessary to give notice while furloughed? No. You are not working and you are not getting paid. In fact, while on Furlough you are not allowed to do ANYTHING for your employer, so any notice period would be completely pointless. This being said, you can still be nice and professional about it. Hand in your notice and ask for any notice period to be ...


6

You'd need to check your contract and your state law, you might be able to leave without notice. Normally that is considered somewhere between rude and unprofessional, but in the current circumstances your old company might not mind at all. If you are furloughed you can't do any work during a 14 day notice period, so there is no reason to hold you back. ...


0

It depends on the contract you have with your employer. If you have an agreement that you will not work for anyone else even after your work hours then it definitely is unethical. But if you have no such agreement after work hours you are free to work for anyone else except the competitor of your primary employer. In the 2nd case its still better to let ...


0

My new boss has given me an idea of a project that doesn’t require a lot of tribal knowledge that he’d like me to work on until they figure things out. Interestingly enough, it dovetails perfectly with something I was already working on for Company A, so I’ve already done most of the leg work for it, and all I’d need to do is adapt it to Company B’s ...


0

Microsoft office 360 can be run on the cloud. Skype can be installed on Linux. Your problem is very simple; just install Linux on your laptop and you are done. If you really need a running Windows there’s virtual box Windows image available from Microsoft. It’s legal. Download the VM install all your things on it.


8

From OP comment: The problem is the employer asked if I had Office on my computer and I said yes. How do I go back now and ask for a license? Please don't lie. Compare that to the driver lying about owning a car. You have to make a choice, either to get your stuff in order, or say something like: I was misguided, my MS Office License doesn't allow ...


0

IMHO, you should make sure to have expense reimbursement details in the contract It should state who makes reservations and maximum class of travel / accommodation Confirm travel time as billable time Your per diem when traveling And vehicle expenses calculation scheme (fuel or miles)


5

I’m pretty sure I can do both jobs simultaneously without mentally short-changing one or the other. But I’m not sure this is ethical to get paid for two jobs concurrently. It seems like one company or the other should “own” my time for those hours. On the other hand, freelancers do this all the time and it’s not unethical at all as long as the ...


4

Is it morally unethical to work two jobs concurrently? No. Probably not. As long as the two companies are not competitors of each other. However, realize that you are on the clock with Company A and they are paying you to their work... which will bring me to my next point. Is it corporately unethical to work two jobs concurrently? Yes. It can be seen as ...


13

On the other hand, freelancers do this all the time and it’s not unethical at all as long as the price is known and agreed upon by both parties beforehand. If you mean billing one client for time while you're actually performing work for another client, then no, this doesn't happen all the time. If I'm billing a client for my time then I'm performing ...


3

This list is non-exhaustive. 1099: Your customers will send you a 1099-MISC form each year stating how much they paid you. It's solely up to you to pay any applicable income taxes. You'll pay for your own healthcare and retirement benefits, and anything else an employer would typically pay for. You won't get paid vacation or sick days. If you're being ...


2

OP said it's really not that big of a deal ... but there are people for whom yes, it is a big deal. There is a big difference between a co-worker saying a quick personal Grace at lunchtime and corporate officers offering explicitly Christian prayers at official functions. As others have said, though, there will likely be repercussions if you raise a ...


1

Every job application I've filled out recently (for office programming jobs) include an apparently mandatory section asking about disabilities. This would be a judgement call for you, but that would be the place to give notice of this situation, however vaguely you feel you need. If the employer is interested in you, then most likely their HR will clarify ...


5

Sooner or later people will find out that something is going on and will start to talk. You should communicate this to your direct boss, but you do not need to disclose it to other colleagues. You could also ask your boss for some alternatives: You could start your working day at ten You could work remotely A good company/boss should not refuse such things ...


1

I typically reply with things akin to "you're welcome" along with an invitation to message again if they need anything else. Regarding abbreviation of "thank you" etc. I hate them. If you're going to go to all the trouble of thanking someone, the least you can do is actually type out the full thing. If I felt really compelled to use an abbreviation, I ...


-1

It is highly unusual that a company not only conducts a non-anonymous surveys, but also points that out repeatedly. It may very well be that the results of this survey are reported upwards, either to stockholders, a mother corporation if you have one, or the authorities. The repeated hints might well be a company's way of saying "wink, wink, please give us ...


-1

The survey is voluntary You know what management whats employees to say As someone said in the comments, it sounds like they are manufacturing consent. I think that the worst thing you could do is refuse to take the survey, or say that you would rather "defer to management because you are not an expert". This effectively signals to management that your ...


6

Some people don't care and don't feel any need to adhere to traditional standards of politeness. That's fine, but I'll answer in the context of a culture that does value politeness (Texas), where people are raised to use their "sirs" and "ma'ams" and suchlike. Just like you don't want to be the worst dressed at a party, you don't want to be the least polite ...


3

At that moment am I obligated to post back "You're welcome"? Is it actually rude if I don't? You are not obligated to respond, although being polite back to someone never hurt anybody. This also should be taken on a case-by-case basis (it's ok to not reply back every time). Is there an accepted abbreviated form of "You're welcome". I came up with "wcm" ...


2

Chats are usually pretty informal. But each company has their own culture. What might be considered overly informal in one company is considered completely normal in another. See how chats are used in your company, and just go along. At that moment am I obligated to post back "You're welcome"? Is it actually rude if I don't? It wouldn't be considered ...


1

You are trying to balance expressing your actual preferences, where the survey is mandatory, in a company where the culture may disagree. I don't believe other answers have effectively addressed the question of how to express your feelings without creating conflict. From my perspective, it would be untrue to yourself and avoid a really important ...


4

You said the survey is about employees' opinion of going back to work after two months of work from home due to COVID-19. and possible answers nevertheless allow anyone who gets their hands on them to deduce certain political stances and opinions, which, given the current political climate, I'd like to avoid at all costs. This sounds like you ...


2

Is it legal.. That depends entirely on where you live and work. Google is your friend here. ... and/or ethical. As long as they are only revealing "piecework" totals - and not base salary - then I'd say it's perfectly ethical. It's completely transparent - it takes something that is a definite and quantifiable measure of productivity and is using it to ...


-1

"I defer to the judgement of management on this issue." Whether management realizes it or not, requiring a non-anonymous survey creates conflict. Negotiating in a conflict situation is tricky business, but for any negotiation to be successful, one must always seek a win/win situation. In order to do this, one must understand the goals of both parties. As ...


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