New answers tagged

0

Does your employer have a person whose job is specifically to look after employee health and safety? If so, talk directly to them. A health and safety officer should have the authority to make things happen, outside of the normal management chain. It could cost the company a lot of money if you receive a permanent injury as a result of a poorly designed ...


1

Talk to the person in charge of benefits in your workplace about what you want There isn't a whole lot you can do, individually, to set a benefit package for all employees. Indicating your interest to the company is a good step to get them to start considering the different insurance (assuming they haven't considered it already), and will be a stronger step ...


0

Unrealistic deadlines/goals are just a fact of life for a dev. Everyone wants it now and wants everything working like they thought it should without having to tell you what exactly they need (including all the one off situations :/ ). I work in development myself and all to often my manager likes to promise crazy deadlines. "Oh ya it will be done by next ...


1

Sometimes this behaviour comes from managers who believe in 'increasing pressure until the pip squeaks'. They worry that you're not working hard enough, and think that setting arbitrary goals will motivate you. I find that the best defence is to point out that under pressure, developers cause more bugs and testers miss problems. It's the managers' job to ...


3

Present a specific solution with a yes/no answer It's unclear if you only suggested the general idea of the adjustable desk to your manager but if so, the slow response may be because They don't view the problem with the same importance you do They're busy and think this decision will take a fair amount of time and effort Hence they postponed dealing with ...


0

In Australia these sorts of expenses are tax deductible, so maybe that may help, I don't know about the US. I buy my own chair every two years and that helps my back a lot


0

I've been part of a company team trying to sort out health care benefits. It's an incredible pain in the neck. It takes a long time and a lot of negotiation with the benefits provider. Among painful time-drains for executives, health insurance is near the top of the list. And, typically the issue of what plan options will be available gets settled many ...


0

I am not answering the question you are asking for directly, but hopefully giving you an additional idea for a solution to your underlying issue. Consider a “sit-stand converter” The following link gives you an idea and is one of the first results on a google search for “sit-stand converter”: https://www.cnet.com/how-to/5-best-standing-desk-converters-for-...


1

You have asked, and you have followed up. In the absence of a formally recognised medical condition that 'requires' special furniture you need to do something for yourself instead of waiting. Your health is one of your primary concerns. You can train yourself to mitigate against this problem. No harm in keeping following up, but these things do not get ...


3

I have considered re-phrasing the argument as a disability issue, though, my pain is not disabling It probably doesn't make sense to pose a "potential future disability" issue. If you haven't already done so, you should raise the point about medical visits. If you have a note from your doctor, it makes sense to bring it. I've only really researched the ...


5

Is it realistic for an employee to influence an employer, and the HR department, to add a high-deductible health plan to the medical benefits offered by the company? A single employee? Probably not. Many employees? Perhaps. Make your preferences known to HR and encourage others to do the same. The more employees join in, the more likely HR is to ...


17

You probably can't. I've been down this road before. Last place I worked, the VP came around and said "the CTO says we have to fix all bugs within 90 days." As we did scrum and I had a backlog and team velocity, I did some quick calculations for my team and the other directors' teams, and said "At the current rate of clearing bugs with the current team that ...


5

You should follow medical advice for recovery. The timeline may be more than a couple days, and it might involve not looking at screens or reading (including using Stack Exchange!). You should look into short term disability insurance. It might be included in your employment benefits. If not, consider buy accident/injury/disability insurance to protect ...


31

Ideally, I'd like two or three days to recover before jumping back into work Unless you are a medic you are not in a position to determine the days off you should need to recover from a concussion (nor to determine it was a "mild" one)... It would be better for your health to consult a Medic and let them determine the days you really need, and actually ...


13

This is probably country specific but in the UK you should be able to take the time as sick leave for however long you need, provided you have a doctors note. "Taking Sick Leave (.gov)" The idea of having a limited number of sick days has always seemed ridiculous to me, but I'm guessing that's sick days you don't have a doctors note for so I would suggest ...


76

but I definitely feel like I shouldn't be here. Then don't be there, burn the rest of your sick days and vacations if needed. Anything else you decide to sacrifice your health for saving holidays/sick days/whatever, and that's just not a great idea.


1

As far as your opening question - "am i still hireable", you're always hireable. (You can always get another management job you know, I'm told that those positions still exist even after downturns). But as long as you have a reason why you're applying for a technical role once you have had management experience (ie I love technical roles), then you're fine. ...


0

10 years of engineering sounds quite low to me personally to be considered for management, so maybe you have that on your side, at a future date you could say you were not done getting your hands dirty doing the real work. At 32 years now of technical work, I'm done for sure and nobody replies to my resume anymore despite me doing the best work of my career,...


1

My old department lead found a job as developer just fine after getting laid off. This may depend upon connections, how much development you did before becoming a manager, etc... Also, I think this may depend on country. I know that in Germany, older people said there is no way back from management. But I think it's not as true as it used to be. But that may ...


-3

Does it matter how many hours you are paid for? There are two things that matter. Your salary, and the hours that you actually work. You worked on average 40 hours a week. Is your salary good / Okish / bad for 40 hours of work at the quality of work that you are doing? That's what you have to decide. If it's not enough, then you can discuss it with ...


10

35 Hours a week is 9-5 with a one hour unpaid lunch break (that has been built into the salary). The company will probably require you to work unpaid overtime every now and then, but this is a way of signalling that they trust you to be responsible with your hours, and sensible with the breaks you take. It's a good thing, no need to be suspicious of it.


7

By state law you are required to have at least a 30 minute unpaid lunch break and your employer can face legal penalties if you don't get it. https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/state/meal-breaks#Colorado ½ hour if work shift exceeds 5 consecutive hours. On-duty meal period counted as time worked and permitted when nature of work prevents relief from all ...


-1

Generally, it is the opposite. Most jurisdictions mandate time off for lunch rather than mandating that lunch can be worked through. Where I am basically requires that employees take a half hour for lunch. I was denied for trying the same thing on occlusion and my manager told me to scoot or I would expose the company to liability. I am no legal expert, ...


0

So, right there in the contract, the expectation is clear: no required schedule whatsoever for sales reps who are meeting sales goals. I am a computer programmer and can thus be literal-minded to an extreme :-) What it actually says amounts to "the 8:30 to 6 schedule does not apply". The quoted part of the contract tells you nothing about what does ...


1

What’s in the contract doesn’t really matter because of two facts: If the employer is not happy with your friend, your friend will be fired. And if your friend isn’t happy with the employer, your friend fires the employer. So if your friend doesn’t want to start early, and isn’t going to start early, he can go to his employer and say “That’s not what our ...


1

Shorter answer: His employer is awful. He should quit now. But if he still doesn't want to quit, he should email the owner something like this: Dear Bob, 6:30 AM to 4:00 PM doesn't work for me. I could do 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM in exchange for a minimum base salary of $15 an hour. But if you want me to start at 6:30 AM, I would need a minimum base ...


3

Any time I'm in a situation where something changes at work in a way that makes me unhappy, I try to follow a few steps to resolve the issue: Make sure I understand the context of the change. Once in a while I find that I've gotten upset about something that will naturally go away, or isn't a big deal. Although, it sounds like your friend is well past this ...


9

8:30 to 5:30 company and expressed how the boss and the sales manager come into work at 6:30 every day. The boss told them to come in at 6:30 am The manager then went on to say it wouldn't be fair to others who start work at 7:30 worse than the traditional hours of the jobs having large base pay, which they turned down because of early hours and ...


7

First and foremost your friend should check the contract. If there is anything concerning the hours, they can explain that they are only obeying the contract. Otherwise, I only see two options: If the employer is really as nice as they say, they should check with him if those early morning hours are only temporary. If so make it clear, that flexibility is ...


2

I was informed that, although they have a record of me entering my husband into the online enrollment forms, the enrollment was never "committed". This is unfortunately a very common error with health care enrollment and something my company tries to bring up frequently in mails and emails. To be sure to "commit" your changes as a lot of folks just enter ...


0

The company pays half of Social Security and Medicare for W-2 employees. 1099 contractors have to pay both halves themselves in their estimated tax filings. They also pay federal and state unemployment insurance premiums on their W-2 payroll. So you can collect on that if need be. Finally, regulators sometimes crack down on companies who treat employees as ...


8

For the employee, the company withholds income tax, Social Security, and Medicare from wages paid. Those are also called benefits. Also even for 100% commission, W2 employees must still get minimum wage. If the commissions would be less, the company needs to kick in the difference (thanks to Kathy for this extra information). In general, the FLSA does ...


2

What is more disconcerting is that my friend then received an email the next day asking them to sign a document which is revised to include clauses like "there is no guarantee of the draws" and "commission is not guaranteed". So your friend is on 100% commission pay, but (according to this revised document) the commission isn't guaranteed - and while during ...


10

However, the job does seem to be a good job because the owner is really friendly and seems to be a good person. No, that's not the sign of a good job. That's the sign of a good salesman. I think your friend shouldn't sign anything and should look for another job. Anything else would be better than this. He should also contact the Department of Labor ...


1

You might be overthinking this, but I would suggest you build up your inventory before going in for your review. There got to be some positive contribution so far. Make a list of your achievements and put a $value to them Try to speak first during your review and highlight your achievements Move on to the challenges you are facing, and talk about how you ...


-1

Stand up and speak in the meeting! Say what you were hired for and what tasks you have been assigned now. I have few points that can help you prepare yourself to say some words in one on one. Did they train you when they assigned you task B? Is it time for performance appraisals at your startup company? (probably that's when the companies makes some weird ...


0

I have a one-on-one soon, any suggestions for what I should say there? I'm very interested in continuing to work for this company and don't want to jeopardize it. You should be asking questions about your work - likely the same questions you should have been asking for the past 6 months: How am I doing? What should I be doing differently? How can I do ...


2

It sounds like you have a good feel of what is going on around you, when your one on one comes up try to be the first to speak and mention that you don't feel that you are doing well and that your expertise is elsewhere and you are finding it hard to contribute and pull your weight. If at that point they say you are getting terminated you have in a small ...


2

Yes, they can make her be wait-to-engage and not pay her for it, given it passes two hurdles. Her location isn't restricted. She can go wherever she wants, within reason. If she's in the nearest big city when the boss calls, that means the boss has to be fine with her taking however many hours to get back to the restaurant before she can work. Her ...


3

It doesn’t really matter what your contract says, what matters is what you do and how the company copes with it. And what’s important is whether your wife can get a job elsewhere. First, the supervisor has no power like that. So the first thing is to ask what she gets paid for being on call - it should never be for free. And if he says “nothing” the next ...


5

Federally, check with US Department of Labor web site, the Fair Labor Standards Act says: An employee is “engaged to wait” when they cannot freely do anything else; for example still at the workplace or nearby. The employee should be paid for that time. An employee is “waiting to be engaged” otherwise, for example at their house with a telephone. The FLSA ...


2

Abusive employers exist, and a HR department knows that. I imagine they may even have a well defined way to handle that. If the alternative is canceling the application, I would certainly just be straight forward and honestly explain the situation. You can be totally relaxed with that, because it will not create any problem in itself. The outcome can be ...


6

Mine will be kind of a non-answer, but, you say this new opportunity will be a great boost to your career, and of course, you're the best judge of that, but to me, it sounds like they are, or at the very least their HR department is, highly unprofessional. Who, in their right mind, heard about a prospecting employer getting in touch with your current one?! ...


61

Don't provide a solution, just provide the constraints. You're one step ahead, but in the wrong direction. You don't have to provide a solution to their request. Just let them know of the problem. Tell HR about your current boss and that your current employer is not aware of you seeking a job elsewhere. Be careful to not call your current boss abusive, but ...


0

Have HR in your new company contact HR in your current company, instead of contacting the manager directly. This is generally how it should work anyway - communications about employment matters should be channelled through HR. HR at your current place then request a reference from your manager, who passes it back to HR. When I've written references for ...


1

If your current manager has told more than one person, maybe those people can be used as references and also to explain what is going on and why you are leaving. Considering what a predicament you are in, the new employer should be willing to listen to these people. I would write an email to them and say just that, you are in a predicament and you trying to ...


17

You don't have to withdraw, but you have to be open with the hiring manager, explaining the situation like you did here. Hopefully, they will not go against your wishes. You are in academia. Perhaps you have collaborators that are on the same professional level as your current boss, and they can vouch for you.


189

You don't have to withdraw your application. You can explain the situation as is, or just make it clear that you would not like them to contact your current employer. Simple: I'm sorry, I have not announced my intention to leave and it would greatly worsen my relationship with my boss if you were to contact them for a reference. If a reference from my ...


207

Talk to the hiring manager of the new place. Make sure that they're aware of the sensitivity of the situation. If there is another manager at your company that they can talk to, give their name also. If you're the person that the hiring manager wants for the position, they'll find a way around this problem - you won't be the first case that they'll have come ...


5

The simple answer is: as soon if anything illegal happens law enforcement could be contacted. This could be (but not limited to) Constant, repeated, structural verbal abuse (HR should be contacted first IMO) physical violence of any sort (no need to go to HR first) Serious death threats (no need to go to HR first) It sound like this should already have ...


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