New answers tagged

2

(Was going to be a comment, but I think it's better as an answer. It also assumes that the information that the OP has provided is complete) This smells fishy to me because contracts don't get changed from 1099 to W-2. If you are paid by 1099 then you are a contractor. If you are being paid by W-2 then you are an employee. So unless an offer has been made ...


2

First off, if this is purely by email and you have not spoken to a person, I would call first to verify that this is what they want. Just don't send your bank account, even to someone who might seem legit. Call and ask. Say you got an email requesting to send a back account number over an email line and you want to verify that request. Don't call the number ...


5

Pick another way to send it. You could put it into a file, encrypt/password protect the text file, email it; then give them the password to the document over the phone. The idea is to use multiple communication systems to divide the information. You also don't have to send you account number as a reply to the email, make a new email so that the chain doesn'...


2

People work multiple concurrent jobs all the time. Testament to this is the fact that the Form W-4, which you have to fill out whenever you start a new job, has section 2 titled "Multiple Jobs or Spouse Works". But more than that, what do you think happens if you worked one job from Jan to Jun and then another job from Jun to Dec? In that scenario ...


7

What is the professional/casual reply email etiquette to this? The response I would use would be: No problem, and thank you for making sure I got the information. This should put the person at ease, and also let's them know you appreciate them making sure everyone who needed the information was included.


16

The answer should be the same as if you had gotten the original mail. (Especially if the PO does not expect an answer for the list, in which case you simply would not send a response at all)


7

The flyer seems to suggest however that once a union is formed, everyone must pay for it. Is that correct? Yes. They're called union dues. Quoting wikipedia (emphasis mine): Union dues are a regular payment of money made by members of unions. Dues are the cost of membership; they are used to fund the various activities which the union engages in. Nearly ...


14

Employees pay something called "union dues" in the United States Unions are not free to run. They hire benefit administrators. They sometimes manage pensions. They definitely need to hire negotiators. They pay for this by charging their members a fee. are all employees of a company automatically paying for a union once there is one in the company? ...


1

I think WORK CULTURE actually plays an important role here, and it probably needs to be called out a bit more than some of the answers here have touched on. A typical work environment has some degree of diversity and mixture of personality types and therefore a sound/robust policy is always to try and be inclusive without accidentally excluding people. When ...


7

To give some perspective from the other side. I don't have any mental illness diagnosis, but I do hate such recognition programs. I don't like being singled out publicly and in particular not by such a recognition program, because that creates incentive to just push someone on the podest from time to time. So aside from getting unwanted public praise, I don'...


8

To add to the excellent answer by Stephan Branczyk, if you know your intent was sincere, there is nothing to feel guilty about as long as you followed the established/documented norms in publishing such recognition. Yes, people are different and they feel different about a particular situation. That's what makes teams and even this world such a "diverse&...


3

Devil's Advocate- If you were being nice sincerely then the person receiving the compliment is taking it far too personal. But, if you rubbed this person wrong -for whatever reason- then he might not feel appreciated by his privacy being compromised to that degree. But you then get offended to the point that you go around and bring him or her up in this ...


10

Being pushed a little outside of our comfort zone in a positive way is not necessarily a bad thing. You used a corporate program to sincerely recognize your peers in an appropriate manner that supports the sort of company culture your management is trying to build. That’s not a faux pas. I’m not comfortable accepting recognition for things I think are just ...


12

I don't think you committed a faux pas, the peer recognition is an established means of recognition in the company and you used it for that. As the others have mentioned different people have different preferences of being recognized. If you want to avoid making people feel uncomfortable the easiest way is to ask them how they would like to be recognized, ...


30

I have several diagnosed "conditions", including impostor syndrome. And I can tell you that I really hate being given recognition, because I think that I don't deserve it. I don't give my efforts that much value, and I seriously think I can do way better but I don't. Still, I get compliments for what I think is a mediocre work. I'm telling you this ...


59

Today, I got feedback from one developer and their reaction was one of discomfort , rather than appreciation as I would have expected. The person felt I was a little overboard with my recognition and how they felt it was only helping out a colleague. Did I commit a faux paus here? You may have, but you really didn't do anything wrong. People have different ...


1

After reading the answers already I'm not sure there's a complete picture here. First, an offer letter is legally binding. If they give you an offer letter and do not present you with a contract to sign or otherwise do not hire you, then you would easily win a claim against them for damages. And if they're a big company, they know this and would not do this, ...


0

Not signing a contract before tendering your resignation can actually be advantageous if you're open to counter offers by your current employer. If you are leaving to make more money, your employer may offer more money on the spot to keep you. They may also be amenable to other changes like allowing work from home, or other benefits. And as others have ...


1

It's hard to answer for sure without knowing the industry, as customary practice varies significantly by industry in the U.S., especially if you would be part of a unionized workforce. However, on average, U.S. employment situations don't have a signed employment contract at all, either before or after beginning work. There is frequently some kind of ...


6

Sorry, but unless the offer letter is signed then you do not have secured employment, period. You are right to be worried because neither company has your best interest in mind. If company B rescinded after you put in a two-week notice then do you personally have enough capital to sue them for damages which arose from an unsigned offer letter? From https://...


2

I don't see a problem here. It could be as simple as they want to see you actually put your wet signature on the paper. This is why presidents sometimes sign documents in signing ceremonies, and not in the garage of their vacation home. It gives the process an air of gravitas. I personally like the process they've established. They sent you the contract ...


2

(Update Below: Start Date is everything, do you have one yet? I'd worry more about that than a contract) To my knowledge, a contract is binding even without a signature if no other contract was offered afterwards, neither party objected, and both parties moved forward as though the contract had been agreed to. If you have (or they have) recording of the ...


8

Short answer: YES you should be worried and try to secure the contract ASP. Long answer: It is gonna be fine most likely. Most likely there won't be any issue. Just sign on the first day. Not likely but has happened many times too: The company eventually decides not to hire you, even if verbally agreed. Not often but I know some real cases this happened. ...


28

I don’t think this is a big deal. If you are a permanent full time employee in the US, in my experience it’s pretty usual to get a written job offer, accept it in email, but not actually sign anything until you get a W-9 on day 1. There is basically no legal difference between a signature and the clearly extended and accepted offer you have performed in ...


40

Update: Based on all the feedback I've been getting, I've toned down my original answer. See my addendum near the bottom. This is what I would say (of course, please use your own words): I'm sorry. If I was unemployed, I would definitely wait for my first day to sign this contract. However, since I'm currently gainfully employed and since I am required to ...


4

I'm not so satisfied with where I currently work. I'm a software engineer from country A, and I'm currently working abroad for a company in country B. This company, which has some really nice people working at it, is really really old in terms of the technology stack. No git, no unit tests, no Jenkins, no CI/CD. The most cutting edge technology they have is ...


0

I can't speak for New York companies but as a manager hiring software engineers, I'd be wary of your CV. Looking for a third job when you're less than 2 years into your career gives a strong signal you'll be on the move again soon. "I wanted to be challenged more" could be a limiting reason for you moving on - not all companies are able to offer ...


0

If I were looking in New York for a programmer job, especially as a foreigner, would this look really bad on a CV? If a potential employer is just looking at your resume it may raise flags depending on your other work experience. In the interview, however, you will have an opportunity to explain your situation. And if I were to explain this with "I ...


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