New answers tagged

0

often behind schedule Is the word 'often' fair? If it was only one project, and you were on schedule for the others, you'd be right to disagree. Estimation is hard. You could comment on what you've learned from that project, or just learn from it and move on. often fail to be at my desk during the entirely of core hours This is more of a problem, as ...


-4

Press agree and prepare your exit plan You got some useful feedback, now wipe the slate clean and restart with a fresh reputation at a new company.


2

If you have opportunity and appropriate rapport, I’d suggest talking with the reviewer first rather than just assuming. But it sounds likely that the major example to which you speak is front and center in the review. Done right, it might help you a bit to respond along the lines of what you’re asking. It demonstrates that you are giving thought to the ...


6

I did not properly communicate this technology change to other team members, and their expectations were that project should be completed sooner on my part, not later like it turned out to be. It sounds like there's a legitimate issue here, so it's not clear what there is to disagree with or comment on. Speaking with your manager and assuring him/her that ...


5

Agree and move on. That's not an overly negative performance review (completing tasks thoroughly is a good thing!) and you acknowledge it's at least broadly accurate in regards to this particular project. Accept it and learn from the experience. The more you try to comment on it, the more you're likely to seem like you're shirking responsibility, and that ...


1

As several other people have alluded to, you have 2 problems. One is with the developer. The sort of moody, petulant behavior you are describing is unacceptable and unprofessional, regardless of the disappointment he's feeling. He is now underperforming and as a manager you should either be putting him on an official PIP if you think he's salvageable, or ...


2

Every logic on this tread is moot. The reason is that you are in the USA, and most places are at-will. That means they could fire you if they didn't like the shoe laces you wore. Unfortunately all you can do is simply find a new job and move on. My thoughts: your boss hired a new person and had to get rid of you and saw a perfect opportunity. Or maybe he ...


2

Right of the bat I got to thinking: you work for you, not your boss. It's you who is investing time in exchange for money. As such, if you think your time is, essentially, wasted, why would you stay? I'm not suggesting you leave the company, I'm suggesting you force the issue of you become less valuable for any other opportunity in your area, whether or ...


2

the manager there doesn't want me to join any other team. In most companies, the key is that the manager of the other team must want you, and you want to move. Your manager doesn't want to lose you, but the company as a whole would rather you moved team than left for another company. If you want to move, talk to the manager of your target team and get him ...


1

Is your specialized skill set close enough to the skill set required for you to work on production code? If not, is your manager ok with sending you to a training class? It feels like he’s going to hit two birds with one stone to me. He gets to keep you for special research AND he gets an additional development resource as well. You also get to work on ...


2

As a first step this calls for a conversation, or maybe a series of conversations, with your manager. They should be private conversations, and you should ask your manager to allocate time for them, to reduce the chance of interruption. Tell him you can do more. Present the situation as a problem for the two of you to solve together. Tell him you want to ...


8

I worked retail and warehousing for 10-15 years of my life. I haven't been in those industries for over a decade at this point, but my experience says the following: I've never actually heard of a register that didn't have a specific "No Sale" button allowing the drawer to be popped open for making change. The mere absence of that button on the register ...


2

If your employment was in an "at will" jurisdiction, there won't be much you can do. Even in jurisdictions that are not "at will", the burden of proof is typically on the employee -- that is, you are guilty unless you prove yourself innocent. As others have pointed out, it's generally regarded as your responsibility to know the business policies. But ...


6

I'm assuming you're speaking of the H-1B visa, based on the April-only points. The application period begins in April and there is a limit on the number of these visas that may be issued in a year. While technically these visas can be applied for throughout the year, there is a rule in place that stops applications from being accepted once the limit has ...


46

One thing that hasn't been addressed in other answers is that in the US, employers often try to attach a 'cause' for termination in order to not have to pay unemployment. If an employee is terminated without cause (e.g. laid off), the employer will be responsible for paying their part of unemployment payments to the employee. Unfortunately, many times the '...


-2

From a security standpoint, opening the till without a sale is a HUGE RED FLAG and is therefore almost universal in retail that a till is never opened without a sale. To give you an example, one place where I worked had a policy in place where the ONLY time this was acceptable was after a robbery and ringing up "no sale". Employee theft is a massive ...


27

What do you think I should do? Assuming you worked in an at-will employment state, there are very few things you can do. If this bookstore is part of a chain, you could appeal to the HR department. You could explain your situation, what happened, and the circumstances involved. It's possible, if unlikely, that they could intervene on your behalf. But ...


0

What you should do? Find a new job. You admit yourself that your till was short on few occasions, and that you did indeed open the till without a sale so that's all the cause needed to fire you. Not knowing the policy is not a defense. In all likelihood is there to serve as exactly that, provision of cause for terminating people, but that's how it is with ...


-1

My condolences for your misfortune. What do you think I should do? Treat it as a life lesson and move on. Make sure when you're employed next time you re-confirm every single thing which could impact your job. Such as what you should do and shouldn't and have it in printed copy for both of you. If you have any evidence of the manager's wrongdoing you ...


111

Obviously, the result of one of the interviews was the engagement of your replacement, somebody cheaper perhaps. There's not much you can do. In the USA, either employer or employee can end an employment instantly for no reason at all. You could contact your former employer and explain that if he ever tells anyone else that your till was consistently $5....


2

'his personality is entirely unsuited to managing a group of people' You don't understand what motivates people and, perhaps worse, what demotivates them. Could it be that you're entirely unsuited to managing a group of people ? (Though you came and asked what you were doing wrong - that's a good start .. I guess you're learning on the job. We all do that,...


3

This question already has a lot of answers but what seems to have been missed is the issue of process and structure. You say that he wanted the position of director but hasn't been involved in management. On the other hand you say you use sprints and therefore agile scrum. These methodologies don't have project managers because project management is about ...


3

You've got two problems here, not one. First, is the performance issue. But second, is this other side he's revealed - that if he doesn't get a thing he feels he deserves, he has no hesitation about holding the company to ransom, or even undermining its work. His behaviour If he gets a promotion, that second point would become even more of a problem. If ...


9

Change the culture. I think he was trying to change the culture. Every other person on the team outputs poor quality code and no one in the entire company even knew it was happening. (Was no one even looking at the code ?) The fact that this was able to happen means something is wrong with the culture. It would never have happened in a culture that values ...


19

I think the root of your problem is something that's common to a lot of companies. From the viewpoint of management, managers are usually seen as much more important to the company than technical people, and are more highly compensated - not just with money, but with status, perks, and promotion prospects. From the viewpoint of technical people, managers ...


2

I suspect you will need to offer him a graceful exit If he is "working to rule" then he is probably no longer worth the higher salary you pay him, especially not the double which he earns relative to his formal manager. You can't cut his pay without causing yet another negative reaction. You can give him a new title, but that's not terribly meaningful if ...


2

The management might have a strange vision of what it means to be a Lead Developer, as they call it a "Director" - where it is common, to solve technical problems on a daily basis, but still has to take care of the fellow developers. This is a position where one does not need to be a social butterfly, but it suffices to get along with fellow developers (...


2

(posting as an answer in order to elaborate the point) In a comment to this answer the OP mentioned: We had a formal on call rotation until he volunteered to take every shift consistently and we dropped the ball on what became filling in the calendar with the same name. – StumpedMoneyHacker I think this piece is very interesting, and could give some ...


10

What He Wants +1 to @Patricia. Based on the information provided, my first guess is that he wants a new title. I would also assume that he wants a "Director" title because there are no more titles for individual contributors. Beyond "Senior", many companies have "Principal" and/or "Staff" engineering titles. Often, these are parallel in level to ...


4

He is at his heart a problem solver What, you think management doesn't have problems to solve? What motivates you coders? The same thing that motivates "normal people" - it depends on the individual. Some want respect, some fame, some money, some stability, and a variety of other things. But what I think you're looking for is engagement not motivation. ...


4

Full disclosure: I'm a freelance rock-star developer with a 30-year international career predominantly in finance and investment banking. If I were your manager, I'd fire you and then do everything in my power to make that guy happy. Some people produce things, and their intrinsic value is obvious. If nobody writes the software, then no software gets ...


10

By you saying "no", you just slapped an "I'm Stupid" label smack in the middle of his forehead by conveying the message "your above and beyond efforts aren't what we're looking for" The short version of the solution: You need the developer to put trust/faith he lost back into the system/management again. Clarity on minimum expectations will also help, but ...


5

OK, time for some home truths: Under normal circumstances, if your best performer isn't a team player and is actively hurting the team by their petulance, they need to be gone - period. It is that simple. Now this of course rather supposes the fault is all on one side but it is arguably a problem of the company's making to a degree, so you owe it to them (...


3

the amount of knowledge lost about certain key systems would be enormous and morale would take a huge hit The bad thing already happened. Keeping him around in this state is probably worse than firing him right now. Regarding pay, he already earns well above his bracket (finance pays stars well), so the promotion wouldn’t have gained him any additional ...


7

I believe you lost the person you hired. He may stay in the role he is in and eventually quit or get fired → the company loses He may be promoted into the director position (without managing anyone) and this will not do any good neither to him (worst case he will become a diva), nor to the team (they learn that going for an "Italian strike"1 one gets what ...


18

Without writing an entire spiel, it seems that he is doing the tasks that are required of him instead of going above and beyond. He is still doing the tasks from 9-5, as you have said. However, he is spending his time to do something else. Why would you expect him to continue to literally work for your company 24/7 when you have rejected him furthering his ...


3

Instead of checking, he wrote a log message which “confirmed that the data was sent to the backend and promptly not saved in [table_name].” Try to get him fired, yesterday. If he is willing to damage the company in such childish ways, imagine what he could do when he gets upset for something else in the future (he probably will after what happened) but ...


65

He won’t say a word during sprint planning, “doesn’t know how” to solve certain problems, and has stopped checking other co-workers code, allowing bugs to flood into production (the dev team he is on is a mess which just revealed itself). It reads like you were not fully aware of the extent of his contribution, enough to cover for the whole dev team, and ...


36

You want a bit of an off-the-wall suggestion? Make him a Project Manager for a small-sized project. Right now, you and your employee have a disconnect and believe two diametrically different things. He believes that he'd be a good leader. You don't - and from everything you've laid out, you're very likely the one that's rooted in reality. But that's the ...


78

However, he wants to be promoted to the Director level (two levels below mine) and did apply for such a position. The committee rejected him because he is a star technical contributor, but seemingly has never demonstrated any real interest in management. Directors usually manage 3-5 employees. That's a bullshit reason. How much more interest in the job can ...


187

Ask him what he wants. Seriously, ask him what he wants. You said that the pay wouldn't change, so it's not the money. You said that he wouldn't want to manage anybody, so that's not that either. Is this only about the title? Or is it about decision making power over his work? Find out what it is. If it's only a title, give it to him. In fact, ask him ...


21

Well, on one hand, you've discovered that the committee was 100% correct in not promoting this engineer. On the other hand, you've discovered that your corporation lacks a technical advancement track that will allow these people to feel as if their careers are progressing. Technical tracks are a strange beast because the bulk of developers hit senior ...


0

This is how it usually works. You earn a certain amount of holidays over a year. During half a year you earn half that. If you leave the company, they have to pay you for the accrued leave that you haven't taken yet, or you have to pay back the money for leave that you have taken that wasn't accrued yet. (In the USA, you need to be careful because some ...


0

Several months into the employment I'm now being told, of the 80 hours I was promised, I have only accrued ~28. Well you had several months to read and understand the Employee Handbook containing the accrual policy. So it really shouldn't be a surprise now. I understand that accrual of PTO is a common practice, but having received a formal offer of ...


-2

Check yourself. You may be getting a better deal than you thought you were. You thought you were negotiating for a one-time sum of 80 hours of leave. The company appears to be granting you 80 hours of leave per year. If you wind up working there for more than a year, is this not better? Best not to make too big a deal of it, lest they decide to give you ...


1

I've known a lot of people who have negotiated some PTO from the outset* when switching to companies that do PTO accrual instead of a flat number of eligible days per year. I have never known someone who was then told that they had to accrue the promised days, because it defeats the purpose of the negotiation. The only way what they're saying makes sense is ...


0

It sounds like a very normal business practice. Vacation is usually quoted in terms of days per year. Vacation usually accrues over time, generally with each paycheck. It would be very unusual to have an 80 hour vacation balance on day 1 with no restrictions on how you use it. The wording in the offer letter doesn't seem to make any such promise and ...


7

You've tagged your location as United States. PTO accrual is typical in the US. PTO is typically quoted annually (X hours or X days per year), but you start with a zero or a near-zero amount, and it is "earned" either every paycheck or every month (or some other schedule of a similar scale). In effect, your X days of PTO is never available all at once; you ...


10

Legalities aside, as I don't think you want to go that route to solve this anyway. I understand that you are surprised by the fact that PTO accrues, they probably are as surprised by your surprise, as this is fairly normal thing in tech in many modern countries (US, UK, and Australia from my own experience). But is that actually a problem for you? What I ...


0

In America you're protected by the ADA laws. You do not have to disclose that you are even taking medications, so it's unclear how your boss knows you're taking medication. As far as I can see, they have to demonstrate that your medication is a danger before they can ask you to disclose it or if they can limit its use. Ask to see their medication ...


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