New answers tagged

0

Then out of the blue, they [sent me some] "policies" that [aren't documented anywhere]. I understand how you feel. Your problem is that most employee handbooks I have seen in the last decade or so all have a sentence like this: This handbook is not a comprehensive list off all situations that may occur. For your specific situation, you should ask ...


1

That's pretty standard response in my opinion. They want to make sure that: You are not making any claims on the company's behalf You are not releasing any IP that was developed with company money You are not making any negative comments about the company or bad mouthing company policy / initiatives. To do that they do need to review your research and ...


1

Then out of the blue, they pulled some "policies" that every employee is expected to follow, except it's documented nowhere and in no agreement. This is something I would have a problem with. They're essentially changing your contract without your agreement. They want to record the call with the press. They can record anything they want within reason. ...


13

You are asking in a public forum with an identity that's linked to a public twitter account about how to do PR. That suggests that you are a person who doesn't practice the level of discretion that the average corporation would expect of an employee that deals with the press. Just because you have dealt with press before doesn't mean that you won't get a ...


2

There seems to be something important missing from the OP's description of the situation: If this work has not yet been published, how did "the media" find out about it and become interested enough in it to "want a briefing"? The obvious answer is that the OP, or some former colleagues, have already been briefing the press about the unpublished work in ...


2

I'm an at-will employee meaning they can fire me for anything or no reason at all. When I questioned where these policies were documented, I was met with a friendly "if you do not comply with policy, you may be terminated" email from the head of PR. That is unfortunately what at-will employment means. It means you can "choose" whether or not to comply ...


28

First and foremost there is nothing in your question that even hints that your employer is asking or forcing you to give up your rights. But if you truly feel that they are, you should seek advice from an attorney specializing in intellectual property (IP) and perhaps an employment attorney as well. StackExchange is NOT the place for legal advice, only a ...


12

They want to review my research (This is what really set me off). When I questioned where these policies were documented, I was met with a friendly "if you do not comply with policy, you may be terminated" email from the head of PR. Unfortunately I have obligations that doesn't allow me to leave my job at this time I'm an at-will ...


4

personally I would call off publishing anything right now. just say "I've been looking at my research and feel that some of my opinions have changed since i started this project so im going to have to re-write some of it" or something like that. Find yourself a new job and publish after you've left your current job


20

From your comment: If they found anything they didn't like, they would probably force me to change it too (otherwise what's the point of reviewing) The point of reviewing the research before you talk about it with the press is to avoid any surprises. Let's say for the sake of argument that you've invented a gravity switch that lets you effectively turn ...


77

Let's flip this one around for a bit. Imagine the situation: You're the PR department for a well-known global firm A new hire comes along and wants to publish some research done prior to joining The new hire won't let you see the contents of that research The upside here is pretty small: it might turn out that the research is ground-breaking and the ...


16

They want to record the call with the press. You've already agreed to them being "on call" so it seems to me that if they wanted to record the call without your knowledge there wouldn't be anything to stop them... (if I'm understanding you correctly) They are forcing me to take a press preparatory course (although I have dealt with the press before). At ...


1

A question I have been asked many times, during an interview, is: "Why did you leave your previous job?" If this is likely in your situation, you should prepare an honest answer, which will involve your previous employer's safety record. I can see this leading to your scars. It is standard advice not to criticise a previous employer, but, I would suggest, ...


1

This is the chance you take You had the employer travel opportunity, and without their consent or agreement to absorb your risks, you tacked on a family vacation which was too dependent on their plan. Obviously the company doesn't mind if your family stays in the company-provided room for free; it costs them nothing extra, so they don't try to charge ...


3

and he wants the development team that I'm in to work on that, full bore In that case, options two and three are eliminated. When the CEO says they want all hands on deck, going in and saying you want to take your vacation right now and hopefully could have some more is out of the question. Stay, do your job and send your family. No extra money spent. ...


0

In the future, I suggest buying insurance with your plane ticket. You'll be fully reimbursed if you decide to cancel. Right now, all you can do is hope you can get credit for a future plane ticket depending on where you bought the ticket. You'll still lose hundreds of dollars though. In my opinion you should always buy insurance along with your ticket ...


4

With the burn as bad as you say, it may leave a permanent scar, which you'll have to learn to deal with, but that doesn't have to be during an interview right now. During an interview, you're likely to be self-conscious and nervous as it is, you don't need to add to it. This is about your comfort level more than it is about the interviewer's comfort level. ...


1

These kind of requirements can arise out of several possible sources. They are filling the position based on a subsidy or similar funding arrangement. Globally this kind of thing comes up in different forms, ranging from direct "Government paying companies to hire newbies so said newbies can gain useful experience faster", to tax breaks or other schemes. ...


1

I think this is from hiring staff copy and pasting existing job postings and then editing them. Even if it doesn't mention internship anywhere in the posting it probably is for an internship type position they just re-used from a normal full time salaried position posting.


3

I second sf02's answer, but I'd like to write a further note on that regard. According to one of OP comments, it is not unusual for people in his company to merge business trips with personal trips, and indeed that might be a cost effective way of traveling with you family. It is not unethical of you to do it. But, you must also keep the company's ...


1

Wearing gloves will only attract more attention to your hands. As an interviewer, I wouldn't bring up your scar if I saw one, but I would be interested why you are wearing gloves in the middle of summer. A burn is not the kind of sign that makes people assume the worst, like traces of injection needles or a blue eye, which you'd better explain. Most will ...


4

I agree with all the posts who say you don't need to disguise or explain your scars. But interviewers might still ask what happened. They are human, and humans can be thoughtless. So I suggest you prepare a small script if someone makes a comment. That way, you won't be flustered, or go on a rant... whatever you do when you're nervous. Prepare a short ...


10

Don't let your scars define you, either to yourself or to others. It seems fairly evident that you're (quite understandably) still suffering anxiety about your scars, and this (and the surrounding situations) is something that will take some time to deal with. I'm not advocating that you should ignore your scars and the issues surrounding them, but you ...


7

I'm sorry to say this but you underestimated the risk you were taking. This is somewhat similar to a situation where you book two separate flights to a destination: if anything happens to the first flight it's your problem if you miss the second one. Your employer arranged the conference and is responsible for the related bookings only. If they offered some ...


1

This probably depends on countries (and their culture) but there are fundamental differences between scars (or other bodily deformations) coming from an accident (or medical effects) and the ones self-inflicted (including tattoos). The second ones are much more complicated during a job interview. In the first category, which people understand to be ...


2

You are over-focusing on the fine details of the “direct to you” money costs, which isn’t usually the costs that make or break a raise. As a manager, the real costs of giving a raise are not the additional couple percent going into the benefits, they are: The political capital expended to go get the raise from my boss/the powers that be, especially if it’s ...


0

I recommend that you think about "What would President Trump do?" with respect to contracts. President Trump would negotiate a contract with you that included generous severance terms, guaranteed repatriation, etc. Then the very second you are no longer useful to him, he would fire you and make you a settlement offer significantly less than contractually ...


17

First off, I am sorry about your experience which you described. I am big believer in that everyone should be able to go home alive, with all their digits, and a "fist-full of money" at the end of each shift. My condolences to your friend. As someone who has large visible scars on my right hand and left arm, I wouldn't cover it. The only things I take care ...


-7

Personally, I'd consider covering it, given the history behind the scar. It'd be trivial for them to look at the scar, hear the story behind it, then instantly decide that it's evidence that you lack the safety consciousness that a professional should have, and instantly decide not to hire you to protect the company from any liability that might arise from ...


136

You don't need to cover or explain your scars if you don't want to. Employers don't have any need to know where your scars came from, regardless of whether you got them on the job or not. That is completely personal to you and whether you want to share that information. Even if you get the job, you don't ever need to share that information if you don't want ...


30

Unless you are interviewing for a position where a specific physical appearance is necessary there is no need to hide or explain anything about any scars on your body. Furthermore, no interviewer should be asking questions about scars...especially if it has nothing to do with the position you are applying to.


10

Should I ware gloves or something? If not, how can I explain it when I'm on an interview? You could wear gloves... but I think that will make it more evident, and interviewers could wonder why you have gloves during an interview. Let's assume you don't wear gloves. In that case, there is a chance interviewers won't even ask and mind their own business. ...


184

You have, I believe, more options than this. Go as originally planned, and ask the company to give you an advance on your PTO, or work some weekends, so you can take a full vacation with your family. Use your possible losses as an argument to let you do this. Check if the company has cancelled the hotel booking you were going to use (Tuesday to Sunday), and ...


6

Honestly, you need to have a sit down with your boss and see what they find reasonable. The bare minimum I would accept are, any costs that were unavoidable by you. Such as reimbursement of your plane travel ticket. Plane tickets for family and a portion of accommodation costs do not fall into this category. You should go into that meeting with a very ...


12

At companies where I've worked, development team members get a lot of leeway on schedule. HR rules like PTO are just a suggestion. The HR rules were only written so they could be used rigidly against people in less valuable positions/departments or against people who the company wants to get rid of. I'd go to your manager asap and tell him what you planned ...


58

Take this experience as a lesson learned. In the future don't plan family vacations at work events. In this case the CEO canceled the event, but this is no different than if you had been laid off for whatever reason. While you were given assurances that the conference would happen, things changed and you should not assume that things will never change. ...


65

Unfortunately, your employer isn't liable for the costs of your family's trip or the extra nights. The firm is only responsible for the costs of travel (and the cost of cancelling reservations) that is directly related to your time at the conference, as directed by your manager. However, you might consider having a discussion with your manager about your ...


8

Is this correct or am I missing other cost elements that go into a raise? Any and all benefits that track according to salary would change. Many companies have a free life insurance benefit that equals 1 year salary, for example. But I'm guessing you are over-thinking this. Just focus on the salary part. The rest isn't something the company will fret ...


1

1st question: It is ethical. Only unprofessional. May ring an alarm bell. 2nd question: No, it's unjust, unethical, and must ring an alarm bell. 1st: Although a true professional company would never ask such a thing, some rapidly growing companies, while trying to be professional, may act completely unprofessional. As long as it works for both sides, it's ...


3

This is more of a legal question, especially as this question has the tag independent-contractor. You entered into a legal arrangement with a firm to provide a service for you. They are obliged to deliver the service in the manner detailed in the contract. Their staffing situation is none of your concern. Their employees going on leave is none of your ...


7

If you hired a firm not a particular person, named in the contract as specific contact, her leave cannot be an issue. Quality of service pertaining to the contract is a different mater entirely. In the case you didn`t receive full set / quality of services, outlined in the contract, you may have legal recourse for part of the fee back, or, depending on ...


0

To add to the other answers, let's take a look at the situation where the American subsidiary refuses to agree to any sort of special contract other than at-will employment. In this scenario you should weigh the pros and cons of being in a relatively risky position: How much the company will pay for relocation? Will it completely cover your expenses? How ...


2

Depending on the company culture, moving can make a good team-building event. In this case, pizza payment is adequate and can even be supplemented unofficially with a bottle of beer. It may equally well not fit in the "team-building" frame.


10

I'm currently a software developer who was once a computer repair tech, who also had to take day labor jobs in college, so I have (maybe) a unique perspective on this, as I have worked several sides of this question. As day labor, I have helped set up cubicles and other furniture in an office environment, as well as moved furniture for large and small ...


5

I'm surprised nobody mentioned prevention. Prevention is better than the cure. In nearly every workplace related violence, it stems from a disgruntled worker. Your co-worker will be the most likely person to carry out the attack(s). In every case it stems from a history of dispute and problems. It wasn't just "sudden" or "unexpected." There are always ...


4

It is ethical to ask employees to do minor jobs which are not part of their job description. Employers can ask an engineer to answer the phone and take messages for the boss if nobody else is in the office, they can ask a programmer to talk to customers as a sales rep, and so on. The two requirements are that the job truly is minor in relation to other tasks ...


6

Is not ethical at all, in fact it is dangerous. This young friend died moving furniture: https://vejasp.abril.com.br/cidades/aluno-usp-morre-asfixiado-armario-poli/


-1

Understand your exits. From your desk, the coffee machine, copier, bathroom, etc. Know the shortest path, or the path with most cover. If you sit in view of an exit or elevator, keep an eye on it. Pay attention to who comes in and out. Think about what is between you and the exits/entrance. If a bad actor enters your room or floor, what will he/she ...


1

Learn your surroundings: A lot of workplaces have more than one way to get from one place to another. Take a path the shooter(s) is/are less likely to use and try to stay out of line of sight. Try to keep calm. This will be harder than you think, but if you manage you might come up with something specific to your workplace (evacuation routes, lockdown doors, ...


-3

They asked you to voulunteer. They are not forcing you do it so its not unethical. Voulunteering shows that you value the success of the company, which may make a good impression on your boss. Also if you help participate in the setup then you might get to have some input on where everything goes. If its just regular furniture then I don't see how its ...


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