15

In some workplaces, practical jokes are part of the office culture (this doesn't necessarily mean a healthy part of office culture). In others, they're likely to get people disciplined or even fired. Not everybody has the same background or the same sense of humour. Even if the "joke" was meant purely in fun, it may not be taken that way by the target of ...


13

Your employer owns your work email account, you are merely allowed to use to it. If there are personal emails contained there, you should delete them. However, based on your company's backup policies that doesn't mean that they are actual no longer there.


11

As mentioned in the comments already, one option is to drive yourself separately, with the simple truthful explanation that you prefer to travel separately. You may possibly have to do so at your own expense. Another option is to bring a third party along so it’s not just you who has to bear the brunt of her behavior. An extra witness might be helpful if ...


9

Are these actions common in workplaces, Not in any of the workplaces I have worked for in several eastern and western countries. are they acceptable? They should not be because like you mentioned it eats into the time of employees (for both the perpetrator of the prank and its victim). This should be seen as a direct loss of company's assets unless ...


8

Do not trust this recruiter. They do not have your best interest in mind. Ghost them. As a recruiter myself that should have never taken place. They are invested in their own self interest at this point.


5

Being X's peer and not their superior, there wasn't much I could have done towards him. Maybe I should have reported his behaviour to my superior immediately. Definitely you should have reported this to your superior. It was your responsibility to coordinate the project, this should have done as soon as it happened (but, the past is past...). In some ...


4

One of the biggest assets in the workplace, perhaps in many other facets of life as well, is to train yourself if not to get on with diverse people, at least not to let them bother you in terms of your own mental state. I have worked with extremely toxic people, it's just a matter of changing your perspective. If you value your job then make a mental shift....


4

The jokes you mentioned cross the line from "little practical joke" to "the person has nothing to do but annoy his co-workers". Someone left a cup of water precariously balanced on the woman's bathroom door, and you can imagine what happened later. No, i can't, since i don't know if any of the woman carried a company laptop when entering the room. A ...


1

The best way to talk about "dark spots" is to be able to describe and show evidence of what you've learned. You've identified that you had a failure - you were supposed to coordinate a task, and an employee who had an important step proved difficult to manage. What have you learned from that failure? Have you been able to put those lessons learned into ...


1

Even in the USA, HIPAA protects health records from employers. A lot of folks here say don't mix personal with work, but in many cases I've seen, certain health benefits can only accept your work email for verification (ex you enroll in a health savings account and you get bonuses for completing health survey). Also payroll and HR information are usually to ...


1

Your company email belongs to the company, not you. You should have no expectation of privacy regarding your work email account, voice messages, instant messaging, chat, etc. It may or not be legal for your employer to audit, review, listen to, or read your work communications, but you should assume that they will. If you don't want your employer to know ...


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