New answers tagged

3

Goldfinger's Rule: "Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. Three times is enemy action." (according to Ian Fleming) Either the hiring manager is deliberately ignoring you, or he is INCREDIBLY disorganized. In either case, you don't want to work for him. Move on.


6

How would you react to this behavior? What would you do? Should I call them out? They don't value your time. The last time a hiring manager did that to me, they missed 3 interview time slots. Apologized each time. Finally when I did a ~30 minute interview and was told that a former co-worker of mine who works at the same company had given me a great ...


8

If that is how they treat interviewees, then how they treat their staff must be fantastic (not)... This is a red flag to find something else... unless they impress you with their explanation at the eventual interview, if of course, it ever happens... So, if you work in teams on shifts and there are shift changes - how will you get notification of changes? ...


9

I want the job but I am beyond frustrated. If I would take the job I also would be working together with this hiring manager and if they were my supervisor I don't know how I would deal with this on a regular basis. How would you react to this behavior? What would you do? I'm sorry you experienced this; surely it can be frustrating. I must say that I ...


1

I'm going to give you an answer for one specific facet of your question: that they can't replace you. Nope. You're not irreplaceable. It simply doesn't work like that, no matter what you might think. I know this, because I was that replacement once. I was hired to be the "Corporate Apps" person at a company. 'The' is the right word there - I was being ...


2

It's interesting that among all those answers from the manager, there was nothing like "If you stay here, we'll give you a promotion or at least a raise of ". That tells you right away how much they do (or don't) value you. If you're not worth a measly 10% (or whatever other amount that's not insignificant) raise to them, then why do you worry so much about ...


0

An old saying where I live says something like 'everybody is useful but nobody is indispensable': they will replace you. Also, this does not need to be a negotiation, there is no need to explain or expand on any issue, reason, whatever. Be kind but firm and just hand them your notice, fulfill it to the letter working hard or even harder and that's it. ...


1

They are trying to sell you on the benefits of a startup, which are valid - being lead person when there’s growth does mean a chance at a lot more opportunity than you’ll have at a “desk job”. But there are downsides too, and you are wanting something more traditional where you can learn more from others, that’s fair. I had a friend recently leave a just-...


1

Let's break this down a bit, to the points your manager made: Our company will grow a lot, we're aiming to do stuff which other companies are doing not so good! Almost all companies aim to grow. Your manager has no idea what other companies are aiming to be doing in a year, or how well they'll be doing them, so this is unsubstantiated. In my opinion ...


17

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


7

They are playing the guilt card pure and simple. They are not always to be believed, you only have to read several other posts on here that say “I was promised X... and it never happened” The CEO gives the excuse well the market did not pan out... So, you need to focus on your aspirations and reasons and make the move best for you. Ignore the guilt card...


1

What ways can I ask my boss to not let this happen again? To turn things around a bit, it would be better if you approached the coworker instead. You felt bad when this person "went behind your back", so it is ok for you to express that in a polite way. Approach them, and tell them such, and that in future situations it would be best if they are clear ...


3

Talk to your boss about it. He/she likely realizes this worker has the issues you identified and takes her input with a grain of salt. Get his/her input on how to handle the situation, explaining what you have told us. Keep in mind there may be a sliver of truth to the feedback she's giving. I hate to be THAT guy, but I noticed several typos and ...


0

What the boss's children do is none of your business. Stop complaining that life isn't fair. (DarkCygnus said it first. It needed to be said again) The employee working with me is my best friend. I do 75% of the work... We are meant to be doing 50/50 [plus my additional duties]. I have to take it all on myself I [have chosen] to take it all on ...


11

It sounds like you are losing your mind trying to keep a sinking ship afloat. Your company is terribly understaffed and/or horribly mismanaged if you are working 24-hour shifts, skipping lunch, and having 7-day work weeks. How the owner handles the separate issues with your friend's productivity and his kids' salary are not issues you can control or change, ...


5

Several things I think of this: Regarding the Boss's son and daughter I would suggest you let it be. If they are unprofessional and irresponsible it's their problem. You should focus on doing your job the best you can (which is what you are doing). Besides, trying to argue or point fingers to the boss's son/daughter is hardly recommended, as you have the ...


3

The only flaw I seen on your otherwise excellent suggestion to approach him privately and inform him that I know he is not the author of this code, explain that the purpose of the internship is to learn, and by copying the code he is not improving his chances of employment, but ruining them, ask him to delete the code and start over is that you're still ...


1

How should we set up our new contract to avoid being taken advantage of again? If you are making custom software, you are in the software business whether you want to be or not. Hire an in-house developer manager or CTO. We cannot tell you if you need to start from scratch or keep going with what you got, but a good developer can. As you've discovered, ...


4

In a comment, you said: no one at our company really knows what to be looking for It sounds like you're a small company without sophisticated in-house vendor or project management (much less in-house software development) and you've contracted with an individual contractor as a way to complete a project. While that is a very common scenario, and one ...


2

How should we set up our new contract to avoid being taken advantage of again? It seems you are looking for legal advice, which is off-topic here. But what can help is getting a proper project management and fixing other process issues you have (not programmer's fault). That includes, but not limited to: write specifications, including functional specs (...


21

The intern has proven that you cannot trust him. He has disobeyed direct instructions and then lied about it to your face. This is a failing of professionalism, but it's also a moral failing, and one that he should have been quit of already. His record looks good... but how much of that record is actually true? How much of that work was his, and how much ...


60

Given that he is an intern and is not likely to understand professionalism in the workplace, I would go with your second option first: approach him privately and inform him that I know he is not the author of this code, explain that the purpose of the internship is to learn, and by copying the code he is not improving his chances of employment, but ...


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