New answers tagged

1

Edited to emphasize newer understanding: There is no ethical issue here. After reading your comments in reply to schizoid04's answer I see that you're not an employee of this guy, but are working on a contract to contract basis and there is not currently a contract between him and you. Now you've been offered a contract (or job) by a different organization. ...


0

First of all, re-read ALL agreements you have with your current employer. If you honestly believe you have no contractual restriction on this move, then it is well worth having an attorney review these documents, as well. The company asking to hire you may very well be willing to pay your costs on this, as it protects them, as well. Do NOT let their "...


3

It sounds like you're asking specifically, whether you should take this job with your client and leave the company you're at now. What I would say is, legally, you should check whether you have a contract or other agreement with your existing employer that would prevent you from competing and/or working with their clients. This is a pretty standard ...


1

I'd be inclined to take a three pronged approach: Raise the issues with her directly one on one in the first instance citing specific examples including the impact on the team in general and project deliverables in particular. If no improvement, then raise the issues formally on the project risk/issue register and reiterate your frustrations and ...


0

Yes, they are trying to lowball you and they've explicitly admit that by saing that it is "company routine" to ask applicants their last pay slip during the interviewing process in order to better match the offer to the applicants' needs Honestly, what better match in the offer they could do basing on the payslip? The payslip doesn't say anything ...


0

Asking for a pay slip is indeed a tactic which allows to lowball you by limiting their offer to an amount you're expected to accept. Actually, asking how much you'd like to get is a variant of the same tactic: if they were ready to offer you $100k and you said you'd work for $50k, there's no way you'd get what you're worth. There is no law against asking ...


8

It is illegal in your jurisdiction of Western Australia A consumer who wants to make a claim about faulty goods or services against a supplier or manufacturer will usually need to show they obtained the goods or services from the supplier or manufacturer. The same applies to gift recipients. Businesses are understandably concerned to ensure claims ...


0

I will start admitting I have not thoroughly read the other answers, just got a feeling enough to know nobody has expressed the same idea, correct me if I am wrong. I am from Italy, I work in consulting (not so smallish) and I will go against the other answers by saying: This is normal, everybody does that, it is not a problem. I have been asked my pay ...


3

I think the approach mentioned above, namely saying that "my NDA with my current company prevents me from revealing such proprietary information", which, quite frankly is probably true when strictly interpreted. And it has the added bonus that an NDA actually serves to benefit you for once. But I think the approach here is to offer an alternative. "My NDA ...


3

In general I agree with the prevailing NO: the HR guy told me that is "company routine" to ask the last pay slip to applicants IMHO the obvious answer is that it is your personal routine to decline any such requests, That being said, I can see one exception, though, where showing the payslip doesn't hurt and can help speed up burocracy: if you are ...


1

I'd like to provide another angle for this question as both I and people I know have been asked to provide their a payslip from a current or previous employer for the purposes of verifying current / previous employment. (country: Netherlands) In these cases it was perfectly fine to black out any salary information and/or amounts as long as it remained clear ...


3

Others have given good answers, but the final way to answer this (after simply saying no) is to say that at the end of the day the place you're applying to is technically a competitor. Letting them know how your current company compensates its employees is highly valuable knowledge and giving it up is unethical. Telling them this will hopefully make them ...


8

I have seen this happening systematically and repeatedly. Note that your mileage/kms may vary within the precise European country you are talking about, the working sector, and the fact that the company is either public or private. I get the distinct feeling they're trying to lowball me (and everyone else) You. Are. Correct. In a number of EU countries (...


22

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) In the EU, there is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This covers the processing of personal data. Even if you agree to provide evidence of your current/previous salary, you should be careful that your GDPR rights are not violated. GDPR requires that any information to be collected must be adequate, ...


1

Negotiate to furnish payslips after joining the company to avoid negotiation based on it. Many companies (at least in my country) ask for payslips from previous employers for "verification purposes". This is done to avoid candidates who fake their current pay and negotiate for a higher pay. In such cases, you don't need to furnish the payslips while ...


5

This is what I'd say: I understand it's your "company routine" to ask for a payslip during the interview. But please note that it's not my routine at all. Make me an offer first. Should I accept your offer, then we can talk about payslips then. That being said, you are under no obligation to even say that. You could just say. I'm sorry, but ...


15

Your current company most likely doesn't want you to divulge what they are paying someone to a competitor. Likewise, the new company won't want you to divulge what they will paying you to a competitor, so it is quite unprofessional to expect you to tell them the same information. Apart from that, a payslip does contain personal information beyond the pure ...


283

My usual answer is, "I don't ever disclose my current compensation package, but I can tell you that I need a total compensation figure of $###,000.00 to leave my current role." That statement ends the conversation more often than not (which is what it is supposed to do). If they balk at my requirement, what's the point of continuing talks? Only serious ...


47

You say “I’m sorry, that’s personal information and won’t be able to provide it.” That is then the only response you provide on the subject. There’s no magic, you just politely say no. You don’t need a law to cite, you just politely say no. As long as you don’t start to waffle, it is firm. Obviously this may end up being a dealbreaker, but this gives ...


2

Resisting your leadership, and the company's morphosis into an enterprise? undermining your decisions by poisoning her own crew against your ideas? Thinks she is "right 99% of the time"? "Why should I change?!"? Going into childish stonewalling/silence-treatments after every talk (implying there were at least several such talks)? I'd say you have gone "...


2

I think PeteCon has a good point with "The company is changing, are you coming along" - this is a growing pain that longtime employees have to go through when a company is growing up. However, I don't think that's the whole of the story. You say she's a competent employee and yet she's resisting your changes. You haven't managed to convince her of the need ...


5

If a team is regularly delivering late, there are two obvious possible causes: Either they are given more work than they can reasonably deliver. Or they are not very good at their job / not working hard enough. There is a not so obvious reason: They are not well organised, and while working hard, they are wasting time due to bad organisation. That can ...


4

It sounds like you're trying to get Linda and her team to use some kind of project tracking tools? If you're a PM, you might find this hard to believe, but many pros think PM tools are a colossal waste of time. They have a point, to be honest. This person and their team is probably working hard with limited resources. They probably need more equipment, time,...


5

I feel before moving onto the action in PeteCon's good answer, as you have already decided to have one last talk with her, you should make that talk very direct. This is how things are now. If you do not adopt then unfortunately we have to look at replacing you. Linda has to be clear that this is not open to negotiation now and things have got serious. I ...


13

I think you're starting to handle it correctly. It's not a question of 'we'd like to change', it's more; 'the company is changing. Are you coming along?'. HR need to be involved at this point, as it sounds like a PIP is in order. In the end it may be that Linda has to find a new position elsewhere. The only benefit I see here is that she has historical ...


1

"You are not paid to think" is extremely rude and a great way to burn an employee Keep the channels of communication open A good QA tester is going to dive deep into the system you're developing and spot things they weren't specifically told to look for. They're experienced at scrutinizing software and may have valuable input. You really don't want to ...


0

This phrase is acceptable only if you are a trying to play a role of tyrant and is usually used by a bad manager. Usually it just indicates that the person using it either cannot handle the argument or cannot listen to other people. The other form of this phrase is "because I said so". In your case it sounds like a simple way to cut off other person. Not ...


10

This is not a productive response for several reasons: It is extremely rude. It devalues the QA person on a personal and professional level. It does not appropriately convey why the QA person's behavior was inappropriate, which leads to... It could make the QA person scared to do their job and perform due diligence. Because of this outburst, it's possible ...


-2

Tests are a somewhat special case when it comes to IT work. Especially formal, especially regression tests. If a test is predocumented (what is done to test), and the results are in the end reduced to a PASS or FAIL, the end result still says "X, Y, Z ... was done, to the result of ...". X, Y, Z being tested can be defined by a contract specification with ...


2

The heart of the matter was that the main tester on the project was flooding Jira tasks with hundreds of comments with suggestions Personally I can see how this would be annoying if you have to read each line to figure out if there is a bug. Also, this would be extremely unproductive comments if the idea is already sold to the business and the comments ...


8

“You are not paid to think, but to carry out tests” Making a comment like this is always unacceptable. Problem solving, critical thinking, and synthesis are the reasons organizations hire people - suggesting these are not important contributions from a colleague is disenfranchising and disrespectful. Your colleague may have been attempting to express ...


4

Putting it this way is rude, quite obviously. A better way would have been "You are not doing your job. What you are doing is wasting everyone's time and costs the company money". (It was also factually wrong. QA is paid to think. Proper thinking would have avoided these JIRAs that wasted time and money). But QA's job is to ensure that the product is of ...


101

According to you and your experience, is this an acceptable sentence under some circumstances? It is always wrong in the workplace? When someone says "You are not paid to think, but to do X", you should not take that literally. In every case you are paid to think at least a little, otherwise a robot would be doing your job. Normally that phrase is used ...


9

“You are not paid to think, but to do X” is always wrong in the workplace? Maybe not, but it is always a red flag. Something might be wrong somewhere, and that wrong should be addressed. If this phrase "escapes" occasionally, it might not be the end of the world, but if it becomes a mantra, the "ship" is probably sinking. Find a healthier, stronger ship. ...


52

If you're in IT, you are paid to think. The sentence you describe might just be the most incorrect thing I've ever heard in my IT career. No IT personnel is ever not paid to think, else their job would be automated. It sounds like the real issue is that your co-worker is simply not using the right channels to communicate possible improvements, opting to ...


9

If the goal here is to get rehired - do nothing. You would be wasting your time. You weren't employed there long enough and weren't dismissed for an "automatically unfair" reason so you cannot challenge the dismissal. It sucks, I get that - but there's simply no legal basis to challenge this on and you've already been through their internal processes (twice)...


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