190

"unlimited holidays" is not a benefit. It's usually a red flag. I know one Senior software developer who had unlimited vacation and they made him feel guilty for just taking three weeks of vacation after one year. It's also a way for an employer not to pay you for unused portions of your vacation should you get laid off or you quit (should you happen to ...


64

I work in a company (~50K Employees) where we have an "unlimited" PTO (paid time off) policy. For us, requests for vacation under 4 weeks a year only have to be approved by our direct supervisor. Then, for every week above that, the request has to be approved by another level of management. This is my second year at this company, and I've never experienced ...


40

The main difference between unlimited and regulated European holidays is this: In many parts of Europe you HAVE to take some or all holidays. In some European countries you even have to (by work law) take 10 working days in a row (so that create a 16 days holiday including weekends). In the unlimited case there is no upper cap, but there is usually also ...


26

Unlimited PTO can be great, or it can be terrible - it completely depends on the culture of the company. The main upside for the employer, however, is that they do not have to pay out vacation when you leave. In California (where this concept originated), the law is very clear that employees accrue vacation with each paycheck, and that it is an asset that ...


13

I worked for a company with unlimited vacation time a about a decade ago. The policy was similar to NateTheGrate's answer -- depending on the total amount you take each year, it has to be approved by a higher level of management. The important thing to understand is that you can't really take off an unlimited amount of time -- you still have to do your job. ...


10

Legalities aside, as I don't think you want to go that route to solve this anyway. I understand that you are surprised by the fact that PTO accrues, they probably are as surprised by your surprise, as this is fairly normal thing in tech in many modern countries (US, UK, and Australia from my own experience). But is that actually a problem for you? What I ...


8

As others have noted, this is perhaps a more common feature of software engineering jobs. I would say it works because engineers already tend to have a lot of flexibility with scheduling and how their work is evaluated, not to mention variance in the perceived value + volume of work performed by each person. What prevents someone from taking a 3 month ...


7

Like so many other things in a workplace, the answer is "it depends". Netflix was one of the early pioneers in the practice of unlimited PTO. An interesting listen is an episode of NPR's Planet Money podcast from a few years ago: Hard Work is Irrelevant Basically, Netflix offered unlimited time off... but no guarantee that your job will wait for you if you ...


7

You've tagged your location as United States. PTO accrual is typical in the US. PTO is typically quoted annually (X hours or X days per year), but you start with a zero or a near-zero amount, and it is "earned" either every paycheck or every month (or some other schedule of a similar scale). In effect, your X days of PTO is never available all at once; you ...


4

You are in a sticky situation. IF your employer transitioned your place of employment, which they should have, then you are now governed under those states laws. However, if the company has most of their people in CA their 'policy' may be to pay out vacation now matter where you live. Remote workers provide interesting problems for companies, especially ...


2

In one sentence, "unlimited vacation" means: vacation at the discretion of the company. Every single unlimited vacation policy comes with some sort of approval scheme over which you will have no control. All the "benefits" of it like flexibility and simplified timekeeping actually benefit the company, not you. Don't expect your manager to remember that you ...


2

It varies company-to-company. Check the "fine print" so to speak; find out the process for requesting and approving vacation time, talk to employees about how they feel like vacation time affects their status and pay, that kind of thing. It's instructive to note that the place where I work toyed with the idea of unlimited vacation some years ago when it was ...


1

I've known a lot of people who have negotiated some PTO from the outset* when switching to companies that do PTO accrual instead of a flat number of eligible days per year. I have never known someone who was then told that they had to accrue the promised days, because it defeats the purpose of the negotiation. The only way what they're saying makes sense is ...


1

You are requesting a day off. It may be denied. Tell your boss that you need another day off and would appreciate it if he would approve it. If you feel the need to address your current circumstances, you can add something like, "I am aware that I have been sick and working from home this week, but some things have come up and I will need to take another ...


1

The definition of PTO is useful start point. It can vary based on location and company, but in general, it includes: bank of hours in which the employer pools sick days, vacation days, and personal days that allows employees to use as the need or desire arises In your situation, you have a personal need, that just became present (second interview). You ...


1

For how to request the time off, as others have already said, just say it's a doctor's appointment without specifying whose or its nature, or say you need some personal time. Generally, such requests are respected without further inquiry, at least in my experience. Something not said so far is that you could offer to make up the time if the nature of your ...


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