Hot answers tagged

170

Is it wrong to expect that they continue my current pay scale if they want me to continue to work for them from a different location due to an administrative mistake ? Nope, and you should tell them such. If I were you, I would rather leave to work for another company in my home country versus taking such an insulting low ball offer. They may be ...


165

It's a scam. Info on their homepage about this here If you have received an e-mail offering you a position in our company or the offer of help with your immigration to the UK, please be aware that these offers are fraudulent and we suggest that you contact Action Fraud at www.actionfraud.police.uk or on 0300 123 2040 using Crime Ref: ...


109

Talk to your manager, not HR. I've seen this happen before, including with an employee I managed. Not everyone wins the H1-B lottery and the best the company can do is to have you work remote in another country such as Canada for 12-18 months. After that period, you can be eligible for an L1 visa or similar, then come back to the United States. The pay ...


83

The primary (if not only) alternative to US employment law you will have access to is simply a written employment contract, which both the employer and employee sign and thus agree to be bound by. These employment contracts are relatively common at higher-level positions, and are commonly used to define severance packages, minimum notice periods, the time ...


36

Obviously you made a mistake continuing with the visa and employing after his lacklustre performance as an intern. You certainly don't have to pay him - he's already broken the employment contract by refusing to work. Payment is commensurate to that work. Not sure about the visa - but your first stop should be to read the UK government website regarding ...


33

Unfortunately, HR did not file paperwork on time, and my visa will expire in a month. Lesson learned here: NEVER let HR handle an immigration issue for you. I've seen departments even in otherwise well run companies that were impressively incompetent. You need to stay in the drivers seat and check and nag at least once a week. Is it wrong to expect that ...


33

If you are used to UK employment law and are about to be employed by a US firm you are entering a very different world. The short summary of your new situation is that of the protections and benefits you are used to virtually none of them will exist. I strongly advise you to get an expert on your side (i.e. one not working for either the US or UK company). ...


30

Yes, you should worry. They are either malicious or incompetent if they send out job offers to people they've never talked to. You should find a website and phone number for the company and give them a call, at least. Don't start making travel plans before you've talked to a human being.


26

I work for a big global company, and we have interns in Japan in my group - and some not from Japan. The answer is easy. Let their HR work this out for you. Don't mention or concede that you don't want to be paid - unless you are so wealthy that this really doesn't matter to you. Their HR has figured out this before and they have a team of lawyers to ...


20

My only question would be, is there an ethical way not to disclose my disability or disclose it in such a way that it doesn't make the second party afraid of hiring me? In short, I would not disclose the information until you have to. Let the company get to know you first. Your best bet IMO is for them to actually meet you face to face first -- ...


18

I read this first as a $35k pay cut going to India, which would have been unfortunate, but there is lower cost of living. But cutting down to $35k is insulting. And less than half the salary going to Canada is insulting both to you and all Canadians. I’d first talk to people who care about what you do, and not what you cost, like your manager and his ...


17

The solution is trivial to describe, but will take time and effort to see through: Get a lawyer. You signed a contract with another party and that party is in breach of that contract. When dealing with employment law, acting randomly without a lawyer is usually very expensive.


14

How I should tell him professionally that I'm interested but need a visa from them to work there? Just say that. "Hi (recruiter), that sounds interesting! I'm not sure if you noticed but I'm based in (city, country). Does the role offer visa sponsorship? If so please contact me at (contact information). I've also attached my CV."


13

1) Check your contract Try to find what it says about: Contract Renewal/Termination Notice (if they need to give notice before firing you or not renewing your contract) Employer's Termination Rights (if they can fire you for not having a proper visa) Any Obligations on Non-Renewal (see if they are obligated to pay for your plane fare home depending on how ...


12

The visa system in very strict in the US. It is illegal for any non-nationals to work without a visa in the States, and for a normal employment visa within a company (L-1 visa) it is required for your employer to recommend you. This has to be justified for management or specialist skill reasons, so isn't just handed to anyone. This visa offers between 1-7 ...


11

Many employers will say that it is your problem to get all the paperwork done that is needed so they are legally allowed to employ you. However, if you are offered a job, and the company asks you to pay them money to get a visa, then it's 99.9% sure that this is fraud, and when you pay there will be another fee, and another one, and what will not appear at ...


11

Why the companies do not like to undergo with Visa sponsorship? It's added work, there are a lot of logistics involved and it's better to recruit locally for a lot of reasons when there are people available. Something as simple as supporting your country and educational institutes. Language barriers, different customs, cultures.... plenty of reasons. ...


10

Stop the bleeding of your cash. Don't give him any more money. I was going to say "Don't pay him any more" but you can only pay for goods bought or services rendered and from your narrative, it's not clear that he performed any services that you could justify paying him for. Let the visa agent know that you are very unhappy with his performance. He is a sunk ...


10

but I'm wondering if it makes sense to quit my job now and focus on job hunting. No, doing that is not something I would recommend. It's always better (as for higher chances) to job-hunt while still employed, so I suggest you start searching for a new job right now while you still have this current job (check this and this other posts that explains why) ...


9

When someone makes you an offer there will be a time limit. If you do not respond within that time limit, it will be considered a refusal. If you do not intend to accept an offer, refuse it politely. If your Swiss job falls through, you can always go back to them and say, "A visa problem prevented another opportunity from working out, so I am interested in ...


9

Saying what services you need and won't need for relocation does not directly reveal you marital status. When you say you don't require visa for family members, you could still have a spouse and kids, but they don't want to leave the country and are OK with you being abroad. Or maybe you don't need them because the rest of your family already has visa for ...


9

There will be a legal requirement to verify who you are (anti-moneylaundering laws), and that you have the right to work in the UK. Taking a photocopy of passport is quite common for this (in case of later questioning by authorities/HMRC), and I've been asked to do this many times, both as perm and contractor. So I wouldn't worry about it, you won't be ...


9

How about putting something simple and factual like: Jun 16 - Sept 16 - Awaiting work permit for Country X in order to commence Job Y It doesn't sound like an excuse or blaming anything - and most people reading that will understand that it accounts for one of those inconvenient periods of thumb twiddling that come along with dealing with large ...


9

can the company withdraw from it arguing they were not aware of the work status of the employee? Yes, they most likely can. (IANAL) Your best bet here to make sure both parties are on the same page and proceed from a completely transparent position. ( make sure the company knows he will/may need a work permit ) Most likely they are aware of this need,...


9

You are starting this question from the position of: Joe got promotion but Jane deserves it much more. How can she use that in an argument? In reality we should assume that promotion and demotion decisions are based not on "who deserves it" but on business needs and value to the company. I put quotes around "deserve" because that is your opinion and you ...


9

"But this will blow up my chance of getting the job." If a company is not in a position to help you with a visa, then even if you get an interview, you won't pass; and you'll have wasted their time, and yours. For larger companies who have several employees on a visa, it won't be an issue. I recommend you put it in the cover letter.


9

So far, existing answers have focused on the discrimination angle--which is correct and important. However, because you are applying for overseas jobs which will require a work permit or immigration visa, I have a different take on the answer. The Netherlands and New Zealand companies were rude, no question about it. They probably were discriminating ...


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