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83

The primary (if not only) alternative to US employment law you will have access to is simply a written employment contract, which both the employer and employee sign and thus agree to be bound by. These employment contracts are relatively common at higher-level positions, and are commonly used to define severance packages, minimum notice periods, the time ...


33

If you are used to UK employment law and are about to be employed by a US firm you are entering a very different world. The short summary of your new situation is that of the protections and benefits you are used to virtually none of them will exist. I strongly advise you to get an expert on your side (i.e. one not working for either the US or UK company). ...


20

My only question would be, is there an ethical way not to disclose my disability or disclose it in such a way that it doesn't make the second party afraid of hiring me? In short, I would not disclose the information until you have to. Let the company get to know you first. Your best bet IMO is for them to actually meet you face to face first -- ...


9

So far, existing answers have focused on the discrimination angle--which is correct and important. However, because you are applying for overseas jobs which will require a work permit or immigration visa, I have a different take on the answer. The Netherlands and New Zealand companies were rude, no question about it. They probably were discriminating ...


9

"But this will blow up my chance of getting the job." If a company is not in a position to help you with a visa, then even if you get an interview, you won't pass; and you'll have wasted their time, and yours. For larger companies who have several employees on a visa, it won't be an issue. I recommend you put it in the cover letter.


8

The protections in the UK simply consist of a legal requirement that there be employment protections implicit in every employment contract. The absence of those protections in the US simply means that those protections are not implicit in every employment contract. This lack is no bar to having a contract in which they are explicit. That is, there is no ...


7

So the company told you that they would not pay the fee. It's not an open question, they already told you. You want to ask them if they could pay the fee. Even when you already know their answer. It's a free country, you can ask them. But they already told you they won't, why do you think they changed their minds? If I told somebody I will not pay for ...


7

I'm assuming you're speaking of the H-1B visa, based on the April-only points. The application period begins in April and there is a limit on the number of these visas that may be issued in a year. While technically these visas can be applied for throughout the year, there is a rule in place that stops applications from being accepted once the limit has ...


7

Many employers can sponsor work visas, so just ask the headhunters if this is an option. However, you'll need to finish up your studies first. Depending on the country you're in, it may be possible to legally work while you study, but this typically comes with tight limits on how many hours per week you can work and what kind of work you can do, meaning ...


6

With respect, this is your first Australian work visa. It is probably your employer's 20th. They undoubtedly know what to expect. Talk to your hiring manager or the HR people. Let them know your situation and ask for advice. Keep in touch with them. Please, please, trust that they really want you. Trust that they'll help you through this.


5

I am wondering if there is a way that I can claim compensation for the days I was here and not get paid? You can by asking. It really doesn't have to be harder than explaining that you are glad that this whole meshuggah around documents is now over, and you would greatly appreciate it if they can backdate the contract start date to the 1st of January as ...


5

is it ok to kindly refuse the offer in my circumstance You can, but remember that the company has spent resources and time on this, so you're not the only one that takes a loss. Having said that, you need to support yourself/family, they will understand. Before doing that I suggest you discuss options including giving up the offer with the company.


4

Many countries have laws preventing discrimination on the basis of disability. You could have a legal case against the prospective employer if you can prove that discrimination has taken place. However, the other side of that is that many employers are therefore aware of the law and very aware of the repercussions should they be found guilty of ...


4

Does this mean that I am being underpaid? Not necessarily. If any, it means that you negotiated a lower salary than you could have. You mention that you have been given the "standard" yearly raises (~4%), that is done to compensate for inflation, increased cost of living, etc.. If you perform well, and feel that you could be earning more, consider if it'...


3

As far as I know, in order to get a Blue Card in Germany you MUST have a bachelor degree where both the degree and institution where you got it are listed in the ANABIN Database. In case it doesn't, I see two options: 1 - You can try to get you degree validated through the ZAB. Takes a few weeks, requires a few documents and you have to pay. But if ...


3

from https://www.eu-bluecard.com/validity/ You have the right to appeal for re-evaluation of your EU Blue Card permit status. The hosting states’ competent authorities will determine the court and the time where the appeal may take place. If you do not apply before the deadline, you will be rejected. So you should have the right to appeal the Blue Card ...


3

IMHO, Unless it can directly affect your work duties, you are not responsible to disclose it. Second, in current situation you would not be able to prove discrimination, at later stages of the employment process it may be more possible. And finally, when you will be able to prove it, you will not have to, because company will be aware of it as well and ...


2

I'd say, find out the point of contact from the job posting, and ask the question directly to the people responsible for handling the recruitment process, whether they have a visa sponsorship or not. This will save some time and effort from both the sides to going forward with the process only to be rejected because a pre-requisite was not met, and will ...


2

I think it's perfectly fine to apply, in the worst case you'll get rejected. You don't really risk anything. However, in some situations it's less likely to get rejected: If the job and the salary allow you to get a blue card* or something similar, it shouldn't matter for the company. Well, unless they need someone who can start working right tomorrow. In ...


2

Put your visa restrictions on your CV, linked-in page or whatever the recruiters are using to find you. If you're not sure, ask the next one where they would have expected to see it. They don't want to waste their own time on a candidate that isn't allowed to take the job.


1

What do you gain by refusing the offer? If you find another job you want to take in the meantime or your plans definitely change then by all means let them know. Otherwise, you may as well leave it open and see what happens.


1

I want you to succeed, but I think you're fighting an uphill battle. My background: I am born, raised and now work in the Netherlands, I have a MBO4 (comparable to community college) degree and a HBO (comparable to a University of Applied Sciences) Bachelor of Science degree. I right now work as a software engineer. What you need to understand first is ...


1

There's definitely a "check with a lawyer" flavor to this question. But assuming that's been done and the answer of "can you even do that as a private citizen w/ no job offer?" is "yes, but it's expensive", then here's my answer: Learn what the timing is - any visa process takes a while. The US process is somewhat dependent on your country of origin, but ...


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