180

So, they want 2,4, 6 or 8 hours work for some pizza... And they now seem surprised that not enough people volunteered. If that is how they value your time, then I am not surprised. They should be getting professionals in, for two reasons: the professionals won't break anything and have the knowledge, equipment and skills to move heavy and/or bulky items. ...


114

Do not make it official unless it is really official I think this is a great instinct, and generous of you. I think there may be some unintended consequences. Do: If you see someone in need or hear a call for help, by all means jump in and help. Identify yourself as a trained EMT. Same as if you are in a mall or something and see someone in need. Let ...


112

Promoting the company on your personal accounts, without disclosure that you're an employee, is called Astroturfing. It's a good way to annoy your real friends and family and it may cause some people to eye anything you post with skepticism (they may think you have a "money making angle"). It might even be a violation of Facebook's Terms of Service. It's ...


84

Does anyone see a reason why I shouldn't offer this? I'm not hoping to get any career growth or political power out of this, it's just something I want to do to help my coworkers. It sounds like a wonderful thing to do! Make sure your certification holds you harmless should something go awry. Or talk with HR and/or your insurance agent about it. I ...


80

My company (a relatively large one) recently asked for volunteers By definition it was voluntary. It wasn’t mandatory or forced upon any employee. You could simply ignore it if you didn't want to participate. Is this ethical? Whether it is ethical or not could be open to debate. The person who organized the event complained that not enough people ...


67

It is unethical, IMO: First and foremost, the fact is that any time an employer makes a request like this at least some employees are likely to feel pressured to attend because they fear that an absence will be noticed and lead to poor treatment in some way or other. Such fear may or may not be justified, but is likely to exist. Thus expecting people to "...


57

Now that the company is interested in interviewing me, should I be concerned about this exaggeration? You are probably being overly-concerned here. Puffery occurs quite often in these sorts of referrals. If asked about being mentored by this renowned professor, you can simply laugh it off. Say something like "Well, [my reference] might have been ...


54

If your date of volunteering was given as Nov-2016 then I would assume that you volunteered for the whole month. If I found out that you actually volunteered for one day only, I would assume that you were intentionally misleading me, that you were totally dishonest, and that you couldn't be trusted. That would greatly reduce your chances of being hired. If ...


42

You absolutely must not use your personal account for any such things. Under no circumstances. It is dishonest. If they “raise awareness” by dishonesty, then their goals are compromised from the start.


37

How can I request to be accommodated for this without embarrassing myself or making a bad first impression with the staff there? First, ask what is the uniform color you will be assigned. If it's blue then problem solved. If it's not blue, proceed to ask if they wouldn't mind giving you a blue one. If they agree great for you. If that is not possible, ...


35

Don't do this too officially. It would enable this unreasonable nonsense by your company. HR is currently reprimanding someone for letting in the EMTs without signing them in as guests and making them sign an NDA Where are you? In several states, it is a crime to even interrupt a 911 call. All states and Canadian provinces have laws requiring motorists ...


34

Unfortunately, I was not mentored by him, as I spent most of my time working with his graduate students and I would meet with him occasionally for advice. If you meet with him occasionally for advice, that is considered mentoring. Just answer questions to the point, don't add any extra information that isn't needed and you'll do fine. Seriously, don't ...


29

Professional EMTs are in a union. Volunteer EMTs are almost always part of a larger organization. This is a question you should be asking them, whichever one you are part of. They will know the legal implications, and there may well be legal implications.


26

I've seen this kind of thing before with non-profit and social organizations. A volunteer from within the group offers to do work that will be an improvement in the end, but the leaders aren't on board and you end up with either a half-implemented solution or a full implementation with resentment, and either way interpersonal relations are strained from ...


22

Can I mention donations as volunteering experience? No, you can't because you didn't actually do anything. Volunteering experience is often a separate section on resumes because the nature of the work differs. While volunteer experience is valuable because it can show dedication and commitment through putting in actual effort, volunteers aren't held to the ...


21

Especially if you enjoyed it last year, why not ask him for the contact info you'd need to do it another time? Just say you had a great time last year, were looking forward to it this year but can't, and want to know how to arrange it for yourself at a time when you don't have an unbreakable committment to do something else. Advantages: it lets you tell him ...


20

I recommend you review with your (EMT organization's) legal dept. about your legal duty of care, moral duty of care, and the Good Samaritan laws in your jurisdiction -- vis-a-vis general instances of being off-duty and seeing someone in distress. It's like gun law; if you own a gun, you have to know the law. Period. If you have rescue skills and genuine ...


18

A church pantry will take anyone who walks in and volunteers. Hospitals are looking for volunteer "patient advocates", etc. You start from doing volunteer gigs that require no references, get people who work there to be willing to act as references, then get volunteer gigs that require references and go from there to paid entry-level positions. Your state ...


16

Specifying that you volunteered for one event on one day that has no real connection to your job does not really add much to your resume. Even worse, as mentioned in the other answers, lying about the duration or making it unclear would be a very bad move. However, if there were multiple one day events similar to this that you participated, you can mention ...


13

Can I list one day of volunteer work as “Month-Year”? Well no. Not at all. What you're suggesting isn't just simplifying your resume or cherry-picking what experience to list. You're talking about substantially inflating your experience, i.e. lying on your resume. Unless specified, listing anything on your resume as "Month - Year" will imply that you spent ...


12

Volunteering is voluntary. I would make sure the CEO really does mean volunteering and then let them know you won't be there this year. Volunteering and donating are often played out to make you feel guilty if you don't participate but you can't let someone else guilt you into it. I think this case falls under any sort of office social practices that you ...


12

Your resume (and your LinkedIn profile) should be designed to give employers reasons to hire you. Donating to earthquake relief and hosting tourists are fine things to do but it's not going to cause anyone to want to hire you so it's not something that you should list. You list volunteer experience on your resume when it is substantial enough to let you ...


12

I would push back hard on this and not just because I strongly believe in the separation of work and personal lives. I'd push back because this isn't the correct way to leverage social media to promote a business. Having a strong social media presence is important but it's equally important, if not more, that the presence be strongly tied to the business ...


12

There is never any harm in making an ask. As for the pay for the work, as pizza for hours of labor is well below the minimum wage, actually that is not unethical either. The terms were stated beforehand for you to either accept or decline. Now, I recently volunteered for a task just like this a week ago. The CEO was there. Before, he did not know who I ...


11

1) Is this ethical? While I think it's fine to ask for volunteers to do certain difficult to outsource tasks (like decorate the office for a minor holiday event), there are numerous companies specialized in moving office furniture. I strongly believe your company was just trying to save some money here. It's not unethical to ask for volunteers if it was ...


11

I'm currently a software developer who was once a computer repair tech, who also had to take day labor jobs in college, so I have (maybe) a unique perspective on this, as I have worked several sides of this question. As day labor, I have helped set up cubicles and other furniture in an office environment, as well as moved furniture for large and small ...


10

Yes include it, you don't have much else and work experience is work experience and this is more relevant than digging ditches. The key though is to use your contacts there to get a good reference legitimising your work and singing your praises in general. One thing about non profits (although unsure in the USA where volunteers actually get paid) is they're ...


9

I would place it on your resume. I see 2 options, 1 list it right with your jobs in your relevant experience portion or 2 in a section for community contributions under your jobs. Personally I would list your normal work experience and then specifically call out in its own Community Contributions section that you moderate on Code Review, A Stack Exchange ...


9

I've been in this position before. I went with [summarized] "Sorry, I've just got a really intense new job/project and unfortunately I just don't have time to continue with this volunteer work but it's a great thing you guys are doing and I have no doubt you'll be very successful."


8

The bottom line: You are not responsible for someone else's affirmations, as long as you don't try to misguide your prospective employer. You are going to get an interview, and you will be providing them with a CV. As long as you do not missrepresent your activities there (either in the CV or the interview) you should be safe. If the interviewer asks you ...


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