38

I don't know enough about the inner workings of your projects to say if he is being unreasonable or not, but I do think there's something you're missing here. The thing is that water cooler conversations are called what they are, because they aren't initiated as much as just happen, to happen. While it is true that sometimes someone wants to initiate them, ...


24

It seems that you have the unexpected interpersonal / workplace problem: the one between your colleague and the other colleagues :) And you are uncomfortable, that they have no problem :) I wish he would either not socialize with coworkers Of course, the first thing that you MUST do is accept things: the social skills of other people are not your concern ...


21

Sadly, you have no other choice than to grit your teeth and continue to do your work. Follow any work related instructions, do your tasks and continue to be the same reliable and thorough employee that you have been before your resignation (but of course only up to a certain level of "caring about"; above that, see point 3) in the paragraph below). Also, if ...


17

Do you work with your girlfriend in the same job or at the same company. If not, don’t get involved. Your job is to listen, let her vent and make her feel better. You should not be pressuring her to act or do things she might not want to do. You are creating more stress. Buy some wine. Clean the bathroom. Make a nice meal. Give her a massage


12

The fact you're new there is important - assuming you want to stay there, and this doesn't turn into a frequent occurrence, I'd simply shrug it off. If you start making a fuss, then rightly or wrongly, you'll be deemed as the one who's not a good team player (especially if the other guy has been there for years already.) If it keeps happening, then you can ...


12

This is a great place to apply the Golden Rule. Seriously, if you walked into the office, saw there was cupcakes because "Cheryl finally managed to get her MBA," would you honestly think anything other than: Ooh! Cupcakes! Congrats, Cheryl! Thanks, Cheryl! As for the fanciness, or elaborateness, or anything like that: Don't Overthink It. You're happy! ...


11

You can stop yawning through breathing in through your nose and out through the mouth. Breathing in through your nose cools blood vessels in your head that help stop you from yawning. Other advice would be to find techniques to feel more awake, such as getting out of bed without hitting snooze, drinking plenty water throughout the day, do exercise 3-4 ...


11

Your actions and comments have probably signaled to the group that you are not interested, or invested in the job. They probably assume you are planning to leave, or find your to be a bad egg and are distancing themselves from you so as to not be considered hanging with the bad egg. You need to reengage with the work and team, stop coming in late, stop ...


11

It is perfectly legal for a competitor to talk to your employees and offer them a job elsewehere. The "scout" wouldn't have to keep this secret at all. She doesn't need to worry that it gets noticed if the scout gives someone a business card, because it's perfectly fine. If someone notices, they are given a business card as well. If they talk to someone and ...


10

I was promised that every major issue in project organization was resolved, so now developers do not overwork, have direct communication to the clients. The only choice I have it either to try and confirm that Project B organization was really changed and I will like working on Project B or quit. From your statement, it appears that you have raised your ...


8

Else, you are making me look bad! Sorry Peter, but I think Sam's right. He probably felt really stupid when the SME said something like "I told Peter all this stuff yesterday. Didn't he tell you?" Apologise - the last para from @Sander Skovgaard Hansen's answer is perfect (and I actually upvoted that for this reason) - and move on, either including Sam in ...


7

We are new there and we didn't want to start from being rude. How to react? If this is the first time that has happened, the best that you could do is to stay quiet. Do not react impulsively and adhere to the slightly impolite request. There are a number of variables involved here. You are new and you haven't got the chance or time to know your coworker ...


6

This seems a straight forward case to form some sort of local worker representation inside the institution, or join a regional or national union and put pressure on management. Such misuse seems pretty common in the health care sector. Since there was already a chance for higher management to properly clean up their institution it seems it is one of the ...


5

I did some research on this during my bachelor's. It's been a while (2012), so I'll see if I can source this, but no promises. Yawning correlates with the time of day, and how long you have been sedentary. Exercise situationally surpresses yawning. Yawning is contagious, and this effect correlates with group cohesion: You are more likely to yawn in a group ...


5

Having been in a similar situation, I feel for your self-imposed ordeal. Letting go of an abusive company is like quitting an abusive girfriend(or boyfriend). First step is admitting you have a problem. You got emotionally involved with a company and now, when it's time for you to move on, she tries to suck you back in. To make it's problems your problems. ...


5

There are a lot good answers to your problem and but as a freelancer who has witnessed a LOT of very toxic workplaces this is what I think. Firstly, you are under no obligation to suck it up. That statement is utterly unhelpful, un-constructive nonsense. You came to this forum because you are quite rightly, not prepared to 'suck anything up' in the final ...


5

Childcare in Australia as you know is and has been in very high demand especially in the large cities. A lot of the centers are small with no real HR departments and pretty much at the mercy of the owner who is also often the person running the day to day business. This limits your options in terms of what action can be taken. In an ideal world you ...


5

I don't work in retail, but in my area of expertise there are a lot of headhunters. They might even call me on my work phone, while I'm at work to offer me an opportunity. Even though my boss is in the same office and can hear what I have to say over the phone. They don't care if anyone notices and frankly, what are you going to do? You can only tell them ...


4

It seems you clearly understand that your Project B uses fake scrum. It seems you competently resisted some fake-scrum nonsense (extra large velocity numbers) in your previous tenure on the project. That is excellent experience, even if it was unpleasant. You also noticed that you had responsibility (prepare code for test, for example) without authority (...


4

Short answer: you're asking the wrong people. Ask your boss - and be prepared for a hard answer. Ask them for what's the best way to hit the ground running in 3 months. Something you've got to understand: working in a small business means that each employee matters more. When you're gone unexpectedly, a whole 8% of their workforce disappears without ...


3

I don't think Sam is overacting at all. I have worked on some projects where I would let a teammate know I'm going to chat to someone down the hall. This is because I knew not only that they'd be interested in the answers, but be able to ask probing and important questions. This has got nothing to do with reporting lines, but everything to do with having a ...


3

When you raise the issue to your supervisor or other management, you can maximize your chances of having a productive discussion by being focused on potential solutions and avoiding blaming or complaining. Develop a specific solution proposal and bring it to your manager. Make it clear you believe the root cause of the issues being noticed by the client is ...


3

You need to have it documented that your bugs were found, and ignored. Don't be afraid to speak up. If the boss doesn't accept it, you may need to go above his head. Or, I don't mean to blame you in any way, but you need to more assertively put it back on him that QA is worthless if bugs are ignored. If you got a warning letter, I'd refuse to sign ...


3

Yes I've seen coworkers bringing food for birthday or child birth This means that your coworker are used to celebration, there would be nothing strange for you to mimic them to celebrate your wedding. I'm the kind to bring stuff to share at work, but for this kind of reason it should be a little more fancy I guess. Try to adhere to what's usually ...


3

All the scout has to do is to come into the store as a "normal" customer, spend 5 minutes trying a coat or dress or whatever, and as part of the process they always talk... Do you like it here? How long have you been here? etc Then, at the end they say to your operative "thank you for helping me so well, if you want a different opportunity contact me and ...


3

But how can she slip her business card without worrying about other employees noticing? Why would she worry? It's a perfectly legal and ethical thing to do. Worst that can happen is that she will get asked to leave the store. What if her business card's forwarded to the competitor's legal counsel who may sue her in tort? IANAL, but perhaps tortious ...


2

Consider asking your boss for some back-up. He or she is invested both in your time being used efficiently and that you have a positive experience while at work. It sounds like your boss is already aware of your feelings about the situation. Have another conversation with you manager and make a specific request that he/she intervene. Some things that your ...


2

This may be a case where you just need to adjust your outlook on the situation. It’s commendable that you take ownership of your contributions and want them to be valuable to the company. But it sounds as though you’ve attempted what you should. Unless there is some other route of authority to pursue, I’d suggest you do your due diligence of participating ...


2

Offer your co-worker some feedback. The behavior you’re describing is an attempt at communication, but in an unacceptable way. In the moment, acknowledge the comment and let it be. Perhaps reply by saying: “Thank you for letting us know. We’ll do our best not to disturb you.” Later, discuss your colleague’s behavior in a point of feedback with them. ...


2

Some of the existing answers take the approach of convincing the smoker to just wait until everyone who is sensitive to smoke has gone home. That's not enough -- even if the smoker only smokes when they are alone in the office, the smoke gets into everything and can cause problems for sensitive people the next day or in the longer term. (It can also cause ...


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