New answers tagged

4

Anyone with experience on how to affront this "different" problems? Is there some kind of solution or angle I might be missing? There's no silver bullet to solve this problem. The only way is to plan properly and execute the plan religiously. If you have different responsibilities, make sure you divide your time to keep a check on each one of them on a ...


3

There is nothing unprofessional about a new employee wanting to make themselves useful. If you and your colleagues were in an office together, they'd be spending time with you to help you learn and become productive. So it is perfectly reasonable to do some of that stuff remotely. Ask your manager what you can do to help, and how you can get "up to speed." ...


0

Make sure that you are forwarding it to the correct person. If you don't know the correct person, or the correct email address, then respond back to the sender with what you know. Sometimes you will get an email where your name was accidentally picked, and you have no idea where it should go. Don't start an email storm by replying all. It is possible that ...


5

Our development team has been "mostly home-based anyway" for many years, and we make heavy use of Microsoft Teams® video-conferencing. (Even though most of us live in or near the same city, and do this for convenience.) As it turns out, some participants are "merely listening." Maybe making the occasional comment on "chat." These participants very often ...


3

Can they "demand" it? Sure. Can they force you to comply? In what sense? They certainly can't send a SWAT team to break down the door of your house, tie you to the chair, and turn the camera on. Conceivably they could fire you. That seems to me to be a rather extreme response to something like this, but I suppose if you refused and the boss insisted and it ...


-1

They can't legally compel you, but they can ask, request, encourage or coax you into doing it. Put another way, if you don't feel comfortable with having your webcam on, there's really nothing legally that your employer can do to take action against you for now having it on. To allude to the reason why this is a thing - with more people working from home, ...


1

Can they demand it? Of course. They can demand anything. Can they legally require you to turn on your webcam? This really depends on the laws where you are. Do you have to comply with that demand? No. Even if it has legal backing, you don't have to comply - though of course there may be hefty consequences for not doing so. That's not to say it would be a ...


14

Do you mean legally ? If so then I'm not sure on the law especially given that you are in the USA. In terms of them broadcasting you, I would suggest this is a private conference call that presummably isn't being recorded and sent to the world then you are not being "broadcast". Its sounds more like you are uncomfortable with being on video and I know a ...


1

How about this: Forward the email to the appropriate party, and include the sender on the Cc list. The email should say: Hello name. Thank you for contacting my team about the problem in XXXXXX. YYYYYY team is responsible for handling problem-reports and inquiries such as yours. I am forwarding your message to PPPPPP in that team. If ...


6

How do we forward this issue to the concern person and also we have to inform the Business team that going forward you have to reach out that concern person for the below issue. Simply forward the email to the correct person, and CC the Business Team. Write something like "I'm forwarding your request to [name of correct person]. They should be able to ...


0

I work in tech and have been in the same position as I have been management and HR and worked across multiple projects as a Customer Service, Support, Marketing, QA, Training. I left from an international Fortune 50 company to go to a smaller sub 100 employee software company and as soon as I got there I had problems with existing employees that did not like ...


8

Discussing with HR usually is a suicide and they simply ask people out. He should make his own way out if he's as good as he thinks he is. At this point all your information is one sided, assuming it's all correct he's in the wrong place and needs to move. Whether the group will suffer or not is not his problem.


4

We are not privy to your partners actual work life, or the politics, lest someone here actually be a coworker of his and can vouch for what's going on at work. So bare in mind that any answer here is mostly speculation, however I will make attempt. First of all this is a lot of 'he says' kinda stuff. So unless you happen to be there, and I'm sure you trust ...


12

Talk to your manager. Frankly if I was your manager this behaviour from your co-workers would already have p***ed me off long ago. Lack of teamwork like your colleagues have is a bad attribute for a worker to have. Your colleagues may be causing themselves more harm than they are causing you. So go to your manager. Explain what is happening, what the ...


9

Dust off your CV and start applying for a different job. Yes, the market is bad atm, but you've nothing to loose and everything to gain from applying, so do it anyways. Make sure everything is documented. If you get assigned to some work, make sure you've some papertail. If you can't find some information in the documentation, make sure to document where it ...


5

The way I see it you have two options: Dig your head in the sand and wait until your country goes into lockdown (it will come) Try to get this sorted before that happens If you dig your head into the sand and just wait for it to happen you'll be totally unprepared for it and will find it really hard to actually work. If you get all this sorted (remote ...


3

The way I view it is simple. If you don't trust someone to work from home, how do you trust them to work in an office ? Yes there are distractions at home, but there are in the office too. I'm personally more productive when at home as people can't drop my desk for little favours with MS Excel. Also this situation is very different to the norm, so allow ...


8

This is a case where the rule "never assume ill will where forgetfulness explains behavior" is important. They're not refusing to answer, they're forgetting to answer. So remind them. Just ask the question again, maybe with a word or two about why you need them to respond promptly. Everybody is learning how to work without being face to face. It takes ...


4

My first thought is just be patient, especially if you're asking for a complex response. People will often postpone long responses to the beginning or end of the day, or until just before lunch, or until that awkward half hour they have between meetings later. If you bump a thread, try to aim for those times. Also, people don't check chat continually. They ...


13

Reply directly to the question with "could I get an answer to this?" This is Facebook, but Teams and Slack and most other messaging apps have the capability as well. Not many people would be offended by being this direct as it just got missed (as tends to happen when there are as many messages as there are in a group chat). It wasn't ignored deliberately. ...


7

It depends. Are the trainees able to do their training from home? Do they have the tools they need? Can that still get whatever help or instruction they'd be getting from more experienced workers if they were in the office? If working from home does slow down the training can the company / department / team they work for afford it. Same goes for the ...


32

I have already informed this to higher management and no response has been given yet Ask them again, they have the authority to implement work from home. You obviously don't. There's more to it than just a decision, there's a lot of logistics and security that need to be taken into account. So they may be looking at all the peripherals. This can take time.


39

You should allow it, and I have two reasons. For one, you risk that somebody will get infected, and the whole company is shut down, without having time to set up WFH. And as a second reason, with trainees/freshers, there is very little reason to keep them in your workplace, they don't cost as much, they are not central to your operation. You are just keeping ...


9

I'm at the brink of just dropping all the extra work but I know that the entire office will implode if I do that. That's exactly what you should do. You're responsible for doing your job, your boss is responsible for the backlog. Don't sacrifice quality for quantity unless your boss tells you to; that's their decision, as is allowing the others to slack and ...


5

but I know that the entire office will implode if I do that. Not your problem. If you want more money, tell the boss you want more money. The implication is that you will leave. I have been in this exact situation a couple of times, once I got substantially more money. The other time I got the run around and quit to be followed by half their major clients ...


13

Here are some things you might try: When you have too much work to do, give your manager a list of what you're working on and ask them to prioritise the tasks. That puts the onus on her to manage your workload. Some managers will refuse to assign priorities, and either tell you to "do the best you can", or "it all needs to be done". In that case, use your ...


1

Turning off the machine won't stop the spread of the coronavirus. Whether the machine is on or off, anything that is present on the machine will be affected by the machine's state. I know this is obvious, but it's worthwhile stating because if you were to turn it off right now and there were any viruses on it, they would still be there when you turned it ...


7

Moreso than any other surface? Numerous surfaces are touched by multiple people every day. That is why offices are being closed and people told to work remotely. Not sure what makes the vending machine particularly special compared to the office kitchen or the bathroom (as let's be honest, handwashing is not always happening there either) or the light ...


-3

The answer from @Tymoteusz Paul has given me some fresh perspective, so I am going to add an answer. You wanted to work from home (wfh) and now refusing would be out of spite and only confirms to your employer that it's a painful process employees don't want. Use this as another opportunity to show them wfh is to their benefit. If this situation passes and ...


13

As per your comments the lack of equipment never stopped you from working from home before, quite the opposite, this is something you repeatedly wanted. And now that company mandates you to WFH (and for good reasons), you want to out of spite refuse to do it. You can call it "principle" or whatever, but whatever issues you have with the workplace, there are ...


3

If there are good reasons why you can't work from home, then you can't work from home. Good reasons why you can't work from home are rare - maybe because you are homeless, or you live in a place where you can't be indoors during day time. If you refuse to work from home because you don't like working from home then you are refusing to work. Most likely ...


0

Just to add to the mix - HR consultants always recommend companies change their vacation package to "unlimited". The reason is that when you leave you didn't accumulate any vacation, so you aren't due any vacation. Be wary of this tactic, it is better to negotiate a solid amount of vacation time and have it in your contract.


0

The funny thing about employee rights is that they are one of the areas where experience clearly shows that more regulation is good. We know this for decades when it comes to working hours. In industrial times, they were strictly regulated - 9 to 5 means you are at your working place at exactly 9 in the morning, not roughly, about, circa. And the guy from ...


2

As others have suggested, "you" are part of this problem by working more hours than "you" are being paid for. "You" need to stop that. There are a combination of methods "you" can use to do this without appearing to be the bad guy. This will force "your" boss to either accept a reasonable work/life balance or fire "you". First, never promise to do ...


1

Radical transparency! Make it known what you're working on and who you're waiting for. About overwork: maintain a list of tasks you have on your plate in priority order. Four hours before your scheduled 1:1 meetings with your team leader, email them the list. Ask for them to review it and tell you if you need to change priorities. Then, when somebody asks ...


3

If you get paid it will depend specifically on several things: The contract between your employer and the customer. It may specify if the work can be done from home, or from another site. This will determine if your employer can get money from their customer if you aren't in your normal work location. The contract between your employer and you. This will ...


1

I am not doing well at this job and that I do not have the experience he thought I had when he offered me the job, that I do not have the general understanding of their work procedures, hard to communicate with and if these things do not get better he will not be renewing my contract which ends in 2 months. The teamleader is giving you a heads up. For ...


37

So... right now, you want to be fired, rather than quitting - so that you can get the unemployment, so that you have the space to rebuild yourself psychologically, and then shape a life that isn't so toxic. One of your biggest problems is that your boss is insisting on you working large amounts of unpaid overtime. These two problems? They solve each other....


2

I have advice on getting another job quickly and easily - and enhancing your career in the process. I call it Deliberate Network Development. It works for Sales and Job Hunting. The basic idea is that you would prefer to tap into people's network than merely their own opportunities - and that the best way to do that is to (a) ask for advice not a job (not ...


3

Ensure your immediate superior / manager (not the teamleader) knows about your workload when you are assigned all these projects to do alone. If you are missing deadlines, explain that you are receiving no support from team members and are largely being left to manage alone. Have you tried turning to the employee(s) who were responsible for your on-boarding?...


3

I actually thought things were finally getting better and that things were finally looking good for me, just to be surprised yesterday that i get called to the teamleader's office where he tells me that i am not doing well at this job and that i do not have the experience he thought i had when he offered me the job, that i do not have the general ...


0

This looks like an end-of-relationship type situation (either quitting or being asked to leave). One option is that your friend simply stand firm. Don't work the hours other than agreed to (I agree that it makes sense to communicate this in a paper trail). Let the boss say whatever they want about it. Work as you agreed to, and let them decide if they ...


5

I wasn't going to write an answer, but with my "unique" experience and the question the OP asked me directly in the comments, I'm going to. Critique of other answers (as of writing this answer) Kilisi has a good answer, but only in situations where the company isn't as toxic as this one is. Leaving only after finding another job is usually the prescribed ...


1

Personal note: from what you wrote it looks like employeers is thinking they're making his employees a favour by emploing them. So in his opinion employee wanting out might be "disrespectful". So I would advise you to keep the responsibility on his side I'm sorry but due to the nature of our previous talk I made some necessary steps and at this moment ...


30

Your company's resources are overstretched and can't pay employees properly anymore. Of course none of us know the true picture of what happens within the company. However, from what you're telling us, it appears the company doesn't have the resources (nor the means to get more) to get everything done in good order. I think it's entirely possible he fired ...


105

Can I improve my view on this issue? Get a new job and then quit. Don't wait to be fired or try and get fired. That looks bad on your CV in the future. Whereas it's perfectly fine to accept another job. Once you have decided on a course like this and started seriously implementing it, your focus and priorities will change. The things that are frustrating ...


0

As good advice as the other answers give, I'm going to go one step further by telling you to act on the problem, not just sit idly by and recording it as it happens. But it's risky and has to be done carefully, with plenty of willingness to stop doing this at any point where you get negative feedback. This all depends on what kind of person the CEO is, and ...


1

It seems really evident that you are frustrated in your current job, and with your past jobs these last 5 years. You should definitely consider changing jobs to one that is more like the things you mentioned in your bullet points... in fact, I think you answered yourself in a way here: I can be my own boss (freelance), define my own rate and charge per ...


13

I agree with everything that has been said by Stig and Lucas, but wanted to share a personal story. In one particular company I worked for, I was Mr. Front End guy. In order to protect myself, I kept a meticulous paper trail. I kept all my emails and communication, etc. Most of the company leadership was at a conference when Mr. BusinessGuy tried to assert ...


36

Lucas' answer has the correct basic idea: Mr. BusinessGuy is blaming everybody else for everything, and this pattern will be obvious to all involved. However, being the target for that kind of abuse is not easy, so you should have a talk with Mr. FrontEnd about it. Something like this: Lately Mr. BusinessGuy has been complaining about you. I want you ...


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