New answers tagged

0

Go back to your doctor, and get him to give you an examination and to write a note stating that the desks are causing you injury that might turn into a chronic, disabling condition, and that raising the desks would likely act to mitigate this. Then take this doctor’s note, and attach it to a letter detailing your past experiences with this process, ...


-1

It seems that you are doing what many people who actually have disabilities do, and that's denying it. Being "disabled" doesn't mean you can't do anything, or that with the appropriate accommodations you can't function as well as everyone else. I have a reasonably severe injury which makes certain things difficult and sometimes I have to tell my co-workers ...


-3

The American way (since you mention the ADA) is that the company is not obligated to do anything unless and until you have a disability. After this goes on for a while and you develop a disability, then you can request accommodations that they have to provide.


3

Unless the offices next to your office are "hot-boxing" their offices, I can nearly guarantee that you are not getting any contact with THC or CBD. These chemicals are only present in the air when the plant material is heated to the point of where THC becomes THC-A (activated THC that gives the effects) or if concentrations are heated to the point of ...


2

This happened to me at a facility I worked for concerning Vaping of staff and visitors who came in the building. The problem was that the management smoked them too. I went to HR stating that vaping, just like smoking indoors should be considered the same type of violation. I also stated that I personally should not be subject with these chemicals swarming ...


0

You've made it very clear to them what your skills are, and what they are not. They've responded by explicitly stating that the thing that you are is the thing that they're looking for. That's basically the definition of "You're qualified for the position as described." If somehow it turns out once you arrive that the thing they want you for is not the ...


2

I was honest with them and reiterated my non tech background... they [can] hire someone with strong UX//UI experience very easily. [They said] they're more interested that I would bridge the client/engineers/project managers gap and they can hire a design team and build processes around me. This is a valid thing to hire for. Sounds like they want (they ...


14

It really reeks of marijuana every day at work and I'm concerned about the health consequences it might have It's important to differentiate between the smoke and the natural smell of the plant. The smoke is the one that has the "high" effect, and also the one that contains the chemicals known to produce such high (CBD, THC, whatever else it has). Now, ...


-2

It helps me to concentrate on what I'm doing and retain specific elements of the idea into my memory bank when I think out loud. It helps me to stay focused when so many other "noises" are vying for my attention, such as the conversation happening down the hall, or a co-workers phone ringing. It seems to me that you should find a way to cope with the ...


1

I've had managers who understand the tech that I do, and those who don't. What they understand isn't as important as whether they understand what they understand. The fact that you understand that you don't know what they do, but you understand the importance of it, is a sign to me that you will be a good non-technical manager. If I were interviewing a ...


15

They have explicitly stated that they are looking for someone with your skillset. Managers don't always need technical experience - and you have already asked for clarification of the role. There's no guarantee that this will work out well, but there never is! Check out the glassdoor review for this company, and if you're comfortable with them - go for it!...


0

Welcome to the world of advertising! So I am posting this answer after the original poster clarified in the comments that they are working in an advertising agency. Here is the deal: Unless the advertising agency is major and has a long history, lots of “mom and pop” agencies pop up and disappear all the time. The creatives at such places just move on and ...


6

Is really uncommon to work on multiple projects with different roles at the same time? Actually, no. It is not uncommon that one person undertakes tasks and roles for multiple projects. However, your current job description is colorful above average, and sometimes not desirable. Why? Because of two factors: attention / focus - when lost, leads to mistakes ...


2

At that scale I would say it's uncommon, but it's definitely not necessarily a bad thing. If your expertise in a particular area can be utilised on a different project and save the company a few hours of time compared using someone else, it's a good investment. I listened to many comments from external people saying that they are very surprised (someone ...


0

I would say in a healthy environment you can head what Julie in Austin answered, unfortunately, those kinds of workplaces are few and far between, but only you would know which one you are in. It takes being more conscious. What kind of language are they using? Are they making comments such as "oh you are not what we thought". If so, yeah, it's time to ...


5

There is probably a very big legal aspect to this, but IANAL, so I can only talk about the workplace aspect of it. It is a pretty big request, so it is reasonable that your boss would want to know your reason for doing this. If is definetly something you want to keep to yourself, simply ask them, and explain that it is a very private reason. Be warned ...


1

The whole post sounds wierd - owner has two companies that do the same thing? why? it seems extremaly fishy. Quit. Start your own company. It sounds like you literally do everything for the company, and owner is actively sabotaging you. You need to start your own company. It's less scary then it sounds, you should get help from local government or ...


3

How do I put him in his place considering he's my boss? You don't. Need help. Resign, and work elsewhere instead. Please be kind. Good luck.


13

There's one thing in your question that really stands out. For example, when we get a client he tries to make me deliver less than what was promised to them ... That's called "fraud," and it's something you probably don't want to be involved with. Either leave, or figure out the value of the product the owner is ordering you to take off, and talk to a ...


3

Plagiarism refers to lying, not citations In academia, plagiarism does not happen when you copy & paste lots of uncited material in a paper. It happens when (and only when) you sign your name on that paper and misrepresent that this is fully authored by you - as being the sole author(s) is explicitly required by the submission requirements both for ...


9

Owners set the goals, managers execute them In all companies, the role of managers is to execute goals set to them by the company owner(s), possibly (in larger companies) through a intermediary structure like the board. As a manager, including the general manager or CEO, you are an agent of the owner, given stewardship over their company (it's not yours ...


8

You put him in his place by either founding another company or joining an existing company that aligns with your work ethics. You take all the good workers with you and make good money with your company long after he's gone bankrupt. For the current company, it's his, and thus it will be run like he wants it. Unless whatever he does is criminal and you can ...


26

"How do you put him in his place?" You have this the wrong way round, its his company, he pays you. If all the others are correct and your company is a unloved child, then the best thing to do is ask the boss how he wants you to run it. You seem to be doing a good job of finding good employees for his favourite company, ask him what else he expects from ...


8

Buy him out. If he's undermining the business, but he's in charge because he has money, there's one obvious method of removing that control: spending your own money to buy out the shares he owns in the company. Whether you're taking loans to finance this, getting all the other employees to stump up a bit of money to buy shares, getting other investors to ...


58

Your company seems like, what I call, a generator. It's there to generate cost (more costs, less taxes) and generate hireable employees. Like a HR department combined with boot camp. Your own manager seems to be aware of this and just wants to get paid, as he realizes that he doesn't have to create anything because that is not the purpose of the company. ...


16

He's the boss, this seems ok for a startup if he has two companies. He's bolstering one at the expense of the other. To me it looks like you're in the throwaway company. Lots of legitimate reasons he might have for doing this. A surprising amount of startups are just funding mines and throwaways. More and more all the time. You're not the boss, so it's not ...


126

From your description of his behaviour and other actions, it seems the most likely result of any attempt to put your boss/founder "in his place" is that you will be fired - no matter how diplomatically you go about it. Brush up your resume and go find a better job where you won't be getting cut off at the knees.


10

Forget imposter syndrome. You're right that sometimes people think they aren't as good as others or don't belong, and are wrong to think that. But you have a more serious problem: you're not sure if your performance is good enough for your job, and have already received some unsolicited advice from your manager a few times. It's natural to conclude that ...


2

The difficulties of tasks vary a lot. It is very common that some of them take longer than others. Some tasks that seem to be hard are actually self-contained and actually can be finished very quickly. So do not compare yourself with your coworkers. You are facing different tasks. It is also not helpful to consider yourself as a victim of Imposter Syndrome....


6

If you ever want to publish your documentation outside of your organization, then plagiarism can potentially lead to copyright lawsuits. So if there is a chance that this might happen someday, then it is a good idea to mark those sections you didn't write yourself or even better to avoid such copyright violations in the first place by paraphrasing the ...


14

In the workplace, you want the best documentation possible, and it doesn’t matter one bit where the information comes from. You will be held responsible for correct contents, that’s it. If you stole a co-worker’s work, that would be a problem, but apart from that any source is fine. Copyright infringement is a problem if caught, but plagiarism just isn’t. ...


48

Academic style citations in internal company documents are unheard of in any organisation I've ever worked at (startups, government departments, enterprise level companies). Links to other useful documents would be normal, but in my opinion there's nothing to handle here - your colleague is not preparing an academic paper, so there's no expectation that ...


18

I think you are ignoring a really large part of your professional growth over the last five years. You were bought on to a struggling team, and were able to get all except one of your team to the point where they are now able to lead successful projects. You may not be a top notch developer any more, but it sounds like you've been getting some excellent ...


11

Whether or not you're cut out to be a developer is unrelated to Imposter Syndrome. If other people think, and act, as though you are better than you believe yourself to be, that would be Imposter Syndrome. That said, no one went from completely inexperienced to a Rock Star in a day, month, week or year. No one is expecting you to be super-productive, never ...


3

Since then I've gotten involved in half a dozen projects, but haven't actually completed any of them Given you are just one year into your career, is the general expectation that you are supposed to complete the project individually, or is it to work as a team to get them done? Do not compare your situation with your peers, as different projects and teams ...


1

I think the other answers here are pretty good and I generally agree with them. If you are lucky and have a good manager, your situation will hopefully play out the way @Bram describes. Unfortunately, I have worked with toxic coworkers before, and an inexperienced manager + HR may do something very foolish: they will try to pin the blame on both of you! ...


7

I kinda had the same situation as you were in. It was a guy who continously had to pick on me, whilst I always kept my chill and never mistreated him or other colleagues. I pointed out that I did not like him mistreating me, but somehow he did not care and continued doing so. What I eventually did, was step up to my manager and explained the situation, ...


13

interaction between us still feels awkward That's because it IS awkward, she complained to management about what seems to you to be an innocuous remark with no malicious intent. How can I improve this situation? There's nothing to be improved. Just a lesson to be learnt and an insight into her personality, don't make any remarks on her appearance. ...


5

"However, we have business operating manager to do this task" So the question is does your boss just want the task done, and is delegating the management of it to you, or do they specifically want you to do the work, not the business operating manager? It could be they want the report done and checked on a regular basis for them to review, or they don't ...


2

First, you need to formally and directly express your opposition of such a suffix being used on you. If the person in question say in verbally, simply state strictly but calmly: I don't feel comfortable being called that way, you can call me X instead. Make sure you keep note about the occurrence as detail as possible in writing (time, place, exact ...


15

Bullying is very tricky thing to deal with, but it can be dealt with. It may not feel this way at the moment, but you have a quite a bit of control over the situation and the bully can only affect you to the extend that you give him the power to do so. In almost all cases, the most effective way to deal with bullying is to address the specific behavior ...


25

First up you have my sympathies bullying is unpleasant to experience whether it is at work, school or anywhere! Talk to my manager about the bully This is the most appropriate course of action IMO - the bully's actions are affecting your work performance and this is literally part of the job of a manger is to stop this sort of thing happening. That said ...


32

Buy her favourite coffee / tea[1], take it to her at her desk and apologize directly and quickly (ideally today, but no later than tomorrow). Don't take right before lunch or hometime. "Hey listen, I'm really sorry when I said 'hair/face comment'. That was really insensitive of me and I didn't mean to upset you". Resist the urge to add compliments, as they'...


1

This is a common phenomenon that happens in larger companies. They start to hire many people and several roles eventually start to overlap or become blurry as to whose responsibility the reporting lies with. eventually you end up with enough people to push every button in the place four times over but ironically leadership thinks everyone is essential to the ...


1

If you are the only person who actively works with the legacy system, this becomes a business risk. If you are sick, quit or otherwise unable to work, there will be no-one able to take over. I recommend you raise this concern with your Manager so they can assign someone else to also be trained on the old legacy system. This serves two goals. The legacy ...


2

I am afraid I will be perceived that I don't participate in the new system because I am busy fixing bugs in the old system. If those are the tasks you are being assigned to then you have nothing to worry for as long as you do them. Perhaps you would prefer to work on the new system, but currently seems the tasks assigned to you are with the old system. ...


-1

To be constructive with this person... Suggest she works from home The only reasons for an employee to be in the office are for easier communications with other coworkers, and perhaps for their progress to be monitored by management. Neither is true for her. If she works from home, she can do whatever she wants to create her chosen working environment, ...


6

You can bail on the relationship and call HR if you want, but this is actually great raw material for building a strong team. Working through issues like this is the only route to a high performing team. Usually you have to work to find issues to work through, but you've got them right out in the open. It may start out uncomfortable, but if you can find the ...


1

You have the same rights as this person. From her side it's would be polite to ask you and your co-workers if those changes would be comfortable for all of you.


0

Different employers have different attitudes to relationships in the workplace. Some companies ban them altogether; others accept them but try to manage the risks they create. In academia, the two-body problem means that universities may even support an academic's partner in finding work at the same institution. Some risks to consider: Not all romances ...


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