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-1

I agree with the concerns you've mentioned and it's quite understandable that you'd want to address it. Ideally it wouldn't fall to you to do that, but c'est la vie... One approach that's sometimes useful in addressing problematic behaviour is to frame it in terms of other people's perceptions, not the recipient's motivations: Hi Bob, I wanted to talk to ...


3

You missed the perfect time spot to get involved when you overheard the conversation. At that point you could have easily expressed discontent with the behaviour of your colleagues. Most of them will not see this as a big issue (taken for itself), so you bringing it up after the fact might feel weird for them and paint you as the annoying feminist no matter ...


6

How do I, a junior, discuss this issue respectfully with Bob, a senior, in a way that he understands the negative impact of his comment without coming off as "annoying" or "troublesome"? Silently, in your head while giving him a pointed stare. Nothing else will achieve your desired outcome of not appearing annoying, troublesome and an eavesdropper prepared ...


0

Study up on the topic of debate. There is plenty of online information out there, but you can go deeper and look at some of the theory behind it and different types of arguments, and/or when people are using non-arguments in rebuttal. Unfortunately, I'm finding many people don't have formal training in debate, as it is more of an extra-curricular activity ...


2

You need to work on being more assertive, fight for your ideas (if you truly believe they're superior), and not allow yourself to be bullied, or pushed around. That's not something you'll learned overnight, and it may take years of practice until you learn to finesse these situations. I would start by quickly reading some books on assertiveness. There's ...


3

You have a challenging situation. You feel like the "new people" can overpower you (and maybe the others), but this is based on perception. Then in your comments you mention that you are sometimes described as "over-assertive" but worry that is a misperception that the newcomers might assume is valid. Also, if you have experience and good ideas for long-term,...


1

Suggest the use of brainwriting for your next planning meeting. Brainwriting is a brainstorming variant that was developed to deal with the issue of overly assertive individuals taking over and dominating planning meetings. It involves each member of the group being given a pack of sticky notes or other small pieces of paper, then spending a fixed amount ...


1

I have Low Latent Inhibition, ADHD, and particularly good ears. For all practical purposes, a workplace should be viewed as a library. People are trying to work! It is a lot easier to whisper than it is too cut off other people's hearing, particularly when, as in my case and likely 1% of the population, they literally can't tune noises out. Perhaps find ...


1

Conflict is a part of daily life, especially in the workplace. You are never going to work anywhere for a reasonable amount of time where you will have no conflict. Handling it properly is a requirement of success. When handled properly, its a good thing. A catalyst for growth. It just depends on how you handle it. If you're civil, and your responses are ...


5

You never have to quit. It is in most cases better for you if you are pushed instead of jumping yourself. And when you think your job is at risk, or when you think you want to leave, you first look for a new job. And when you found one, and a legally binding contract is signed, that's when you give notice. One thing you didn't say who was making comments on ...


9

Is there any unwritten rule when should one leave the job if there are some misunderstanding with the boss? General rule of thumb when you're unhappy is to get another job before you quit. Don't base it on personal issues without that, unemployment isn't fun.


9

You have to be clear what your responsibilities are. You are responsible for: Letting your manager know Provide appropriate statements to the police General sympathy to the customer You are NOT responsible for: The actual theft The recovery of the theft Compensation of the theft Your position is that you are part of the scene where the crime took place, ...


4

I basically agree with Kilisi's answer, but with some slight changes. Inform you boss as soon as possible, if that has not already been done. Ask for any video to be preserved and examined. You should not touch the video yourself, because if anything goes wrong you could be suspected of destroying the video because it showed something you needed to hide. ...


4

Can I he fired over this That's unlikely but unknown However do your duty. Ascertain if a wallet was in fact left if you have video footage, and who touched it. Then inform your boss. If there is no video footage and you never saw a wallet on the counter then just say that.


10

Whilst it isn't ideal that you've taken on a role, and are now asking for adjustments, it shouldn't something that you avoid. If somebody is perfectly fine, and becomes disabled whilst employed are they not allowed to ask for adjustments? As you've tagged that you're in the UK there are specific things that will apply to your employment. Whether your ...


65

First, seek treatment for your phobia. There are specialists in the field and treatment is extremely effective. Second, the likelihood of legal action against someone with a disability is low, though it may damage your reputation in the industry. Third, and most important, Always do your research, and be aware of your limitations I have sensory issues, ...


2

First, important question: Is your phobia diagnosed to be severe enough to be a disability? Not all phobias are and not all psychologists 'believe' that one can be a disability. Because if it is then you should be fine, any repercussions are illegal unless the disability severely impacts your work. To illustrate the level of "severely" I am talking about ...


2

Best answer here is just to start the conversation with your boss. You've made some good points above about why you think it would be beneficial to WFH as well as suggesting that it would be a help to the company if your salary switched to hourly. It may be that you don't need to become a contractor as such (this has it's downsides) but a renegotiation of ...


0

Good answers already. There is one other thing to contemplate in these sorts of situations. Your boss is slowly digging a hole. He may soon just leave, quite possibly he is actively job hunting. There is potentially an opportunity if the scenario is right for advancement. So look closely at what could be done to make yourself look like a good candidate for ...


2

Your boss is feeling bitter and burned. This is apparently the core of your current issue. So, try to help that as best you can. The first thing you can do is go to your boss, and ask what you can do to help. It's a nontrivial emotional lift, but talking with him, listening to him, and being supportive will likely help at least some, and it's highly ...


9

This is a battle that is being fought way above your paygrade. The only thing you can really do is talk to your boss in private, preferably after work, offsite. Remember, what you are seeing are the results of disputes you have not seen. Maintain your course, and try to bring as much of a positive attitude as you can muster, make changes where you can, ...


5

My boss is motivated but is no longer engaged and suspects he is losing his job and this is making everyone feel unhappy, what can I do? Do your job, to the best of your ability. Part of your job is to help your boss do his by providing any work related information (ie Systems is running slow due to XYZ and I fixed it before it was noticed ). Factual ...


-1

What should be done in such cases? How to explain them that we also require some mental peace to relieve stress. Or this is the time to reconsider my future at this company? If your key responsibility to be available all the time whenever required for the client then attending these meetings falls under this responsibility. That being said, if you don't ...


1

I think you need to look at the situation from the client's side as well and remember that this is not an ideal situation for either side. Being in a situation where you are working with different teams across such a drastic timezone difference and different companies is always difficult. You are asking how to avoid client calls after work hours but on the ...


-1

Have an honest conversation with your boss. I bet you're not the only person who doesn't want to have to work late and there's a good chance he/she has already spoken with other members of your team about this exact issue. If one of my employees were in this situation, I might let her come in late the next day or work from home on the day of a late night ...


4

Every project / assignment has it's own demands. That includes the shift / work timing. Ideally, you should have been made aware of the work timing for this project before you joined, if you were not - ask your manager. Considering you're taking about work-life balance (and not only looking for overtime payment), and as you mentioned these are status ...


-4

In a normal situation, I would suggest becoming unavailable. Don't answer your phone or keep it on silent, if you have any instant messaging app on your phone then remove them, only check your emails at work etc. However it sound like you are expected to be available. If that the case and your manager's voice is not getting heard then I will suggest ...


2

It sounds like a member of your department has been commenting negatively on emails sent, making passive aggressive responses to reasonable questions, and trying to micromanage the team. These are behavioural issues, and are just the kind of thing a manager would want - and would be able - to address. What might have confused the issue here, based on the ...


16

The unfortunate fact is behavioral issues are best dealt with by the people in the room at the time. That means being assertive and making comments like the following in the moment: "Let's please avoid negative comments." "There's no need for passive aggressiveness. It was a reasonable question." "We have a good plan here and I think everyone knows their ...


0

Speak to a higher manager along with the rest of the team Considering that your manager is retiring in 6 days and that they are unwilling (or unable) to help with this problem, your best option may be to speak to the person one level above your manager. Perhaps the best way to do this would be to arrange a meeting with this person along with all of the ...


6

The most important thing: you should check this with a professional. Mental health is important and conditions can be treated. My answer below will focus on your approach at work, since I'm not a mental health professional. Based on the details you provided in your question, there are two fundamental problems here: 1) It seems it's not just you, and the ...


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