New answers tagged

-1

The problem is most likely not your technical knowledge. Usually job levels come with a list of characteristics you're supposed to have at that level, and usually where you're at on each of those characteristics is written down in your annual review. Typically for intermediate software engineers it's things like: Completes work on time. Starting to get ...


3

If you're on a performance improvement plan, then your best plan of action is to immediately start looking for another job. Look hard, you're going to be unemployed soon. Everyone gets assigned crappy projects. What separates the seniors from the juniors is what they do with the project. If you can go into some scary old spaghetti code and make the ...


-1

Ask for a air conditioner redirector


6

Don't be embarrassed to mention this stuff. It is routine work to adjust the ventilation to match the needs of the occupants of an office building. That is especially true if your new floor was recently renovated. There's no way for the heating / ventilation / air conditioning (HVAC) people to know unless you tell them.


6

The monitors have built in, non-adjustable stands, so they sit another 6 inches above the desk so the bottom bezel of the monitor is pretty much at eye level. This causes neck strain because I'm looking up all day. This looks like an OSHA violation. If I'm reading [the OSHA documentation] right, the top bezel should be at eye level, not the bottom one. I'...


1

Tell them for the benefit of others. They are unlikely to do anything about it, but there may be future similar complaints that force them to fix things. Do it for future employees; nobody should have to suffer in an unsuitable office environment. It won't really affect you as you are leaving (as others have noted), but it may help others.


13

it was not a good fit, as I mentioned earlier. My body does not fit the workstation, I was going home with a lot of pain, and my doctor told me to stop immediately. It's too bad. I liked everything else about the company. That's what you say.


1

It really comes down to the kind of relationship you have with whoever is doing the exit interview or the company. If you think they would be positively receptive to your comments and that it might help them improve themselves and maybe even be reflected positively in their future dealings with you, then tell them. If you think they'll feel like you're just ...


20

What is the best solution for me? I suggest you approach HR or your manager, and tell them about this. Say that currently the AC is distracting you from your work, and ask what can be done to solve it. You can then work on a solution that is Ok for everybody. Taking a guess, I assume that the AC stream can be redirected, in a way that it does not point ...


21

Tell them the reason you're leaving; it's a solid reason, and that knowledge may help them prevent future employees from leaving. However - don't leave it at that. If you're going to be honest and deliver some bad news to them, you should also deliver good news. Make sure they know that you enjoyed everything else about the job, and single some items and ...


32

The moment you decide to leave a job, their problems stop being your problems. If they ask "what can we do in future to make life easier for other people who work here?" that's an opening to give them some feedback about problems in their building. But you cannot fix their problems. So you have nothing to gain from offering unsolicited advice. They've ...


27

I'd still say - do not go into details, give them a very generalized reason and move on. As you mentioned in another comment that when you wanted to discuss / report this issue, HR folks got angry, so most likely citing the same reason for leaving is not going to be taken positively and appreciated. There'e nothing for you to gain by providing any feedback ...


104

I'm resigning for ergonomic reasons and ideally I want to explain this at the exit interview, so they know it's nothing personal, and hopefully they will take action for others if they see that someone is actually leaving over it. Since it's nothing personal, is it professionally safe to explain my ergonomic reasons or should I just keep it vague ...


4

Uh, you've got a few different problems you're having to deal with at the moment: You've got a coworker making lots of mistakes. You've got a coworker that's causing interpersonal strife. You've got a coworker that you don't have a productive communication channel with. You've got a boss that you can't talk to (technically, your former boss' boss is now ...


0

Its mostly about your contract and what you are contracted to do. In the UK you can not be forced to work more than 48 hours per week. You should speak with Acas They provide free and impartial advice for workplace rights and can instigate tribunals if needs be.


0

One word: LinkedIn. In more than one word: online community job hunting. They can physically check your desk but they have no access to your personal mobile device. Interviews can be scheduled 24/7 in the virtual world. Leave the cave and join the rest of the modern world.


4

One thing I haven't seen anyone else mention is to do the interviews during your lunch break. Plan on leaving the building for lunch (to get away from prying eyes, etc.) and go park somewhere and do the interview from your car or someplace comfortable. There's a good chance that you can complete the interview within the hour and get back to work. Read your ...


1

No good company will turn down a chance to interview a candidate out of normal work hours and even do so on the weekend if needed. You aren't applying for jobs with the right company.


10

Here's the answer you don't want to hear. If the company you want to interview with cannot accommodate a call at say 8:30 or 5:30, there's a good chance they will be just as draconian about being at your desk from 9-5 as your current company. Cross them off your list. You will end up with fewer options, but a greater percent of those options will be ...


2

A few ideas and thoughts I had, after reading other ideas... I like the using sick time answers provided since they can't really tell you it's wrong. You mentioned family, so you could say you had to care for them, which would be inappropriate to ask for documentation of - and easy to justify a refusal. Another option is to give a PTO request as soon as ...


4

It seems that you will be working for this company until either you retire, or they fire you because they don't need you anymore, or they fire you because they catch you trying to get a job elsewhere. Their behaviour is frankly disgusting. So guidelines for what you do should be: You want a job elsewhere where you work with normal people. If your actions ...


16

There's no PTO. PTO was promised during the interview and is in my signed employment agreement, but it's actually never approved. Same with work-from-home, it's never allowed. You need to log and document this behavior. Ideally, if you ask for PTO, you (and your coworkers) should ask for it via email or via texts. You really need to memorialize this ...


7

Just wanted to post an answer on the legal aspect, because while I'm not a lawyer, there appeared to be a large amount of advice that seems false by some googling. First and foremost: Federal Law doesn't actually dictate breaks the company is required to give you. There are no federal regulations that determine a set number of breaks per number of ...


4

Mute your phone and use a second phone to do the interview. You dont need to pickup. Or leave your phone muted in your desk.


56

While the FLSA doesn't require or dictate sick time, an employment agreement is a legally binding contract. If sick time is designated and specified in the employment agreement, and if your employer doesn't approve or allow you to take sick time then they very well may be in breach of the employment agreement/contract. Have you considered asking that the ...


225

At my job people often will call me if I go to the bathroom or the break room. They don't need anything, they just want to make sure that I'm still at the office and that I'm not interviewing. This is... extremely paranoid behavior... I completely see why you need to leave. Phone interviews often have to happen during normal business hours. Do not ...


58

There are a number of red flags here and you're right to be concerned and looking for a way out. Short of any legal action, and assuming you can't get around any of this, your primary option is to be open with the companies you're interviewing with (you're right to be cautious, given you have a family to support). They will respect that you have a job and ...


1

If the "owner" is the owner of the building management company, then the owner would have a nice little conversation with the building manager, and explain to her that he doesn't appreciate if the building manager subtly tries to assign blame to him for her own mistakes. If the "owner" is the owner of the building that the building manager manages, he ...


0

Here's a couple of additional possibilities I thought of (further to the already excellent answers already posted!) This is based on my experience in the past with a specific co-worker, in case none of the existing answers seem to address what you feel your co-worker's motivations may be. Possibilities Your co-worker may be - for whatever reason - anxious ...


7

I am a senior developer in a situation similar to this. In my case, the junior programmer also complains that I will let redundant code through for others, while complaining about stylistic things in their PRs. That doesn't make sense, at first - we're told to avoid redundant code! The junior I'm dealing with, however, applies that principle too much. I'...


5

There are a few different things that might concern you about this. If you take a look at what you're thinking and figure out which of these are problems for you, you'll be able to make a more targeted solution. Possibilities: You're worried about your co-worker's well being. You're worried it'll reflect badly on you that someone else did your work. ...


6

It doesn't matter why they ended up working when they weren't supposed to. It isn't any of your business. Their plans could have fallen through, a vacation got cancelled, family changed plans, who knows? It doesn't matter. If its square with their manager it is a done deal. I was supposed to finish month-end activities on 27th December, upon my return, ...


4

Four possibilities: A simple oversight. That person is depressed or has some other issue. She may not like the quality of your work. Fourth possibility. That person is committing fraud. In auditing, one clue, that someone is committing fraud, is that they're not taking their vacation when they're supposed to, and they're not letting others do their work, ...


28

I really don't know how to react to this! As I feel upset as well as have little bit worried about co-worker as well! Don't overthink it, be happy that the work is done. Enjoy the rest of the holidays. Could you please help me how to tackle this co-worker as this is not the first time, he has done this: working over holidays / weekends and take up my ...


4

A possibility that you should consider is that your code reviews are strict because someone genuinely wants you to improve (and apparently doesn't care about the other new team member). That's the good one. A bad possibility is that someone dislikes you and intentionally gives you a hard time. You'll have to figure out which one it is. As long as you think ...


9

On code review we had a new guy as well whom he/she just pass the code review, then when I check the code I was very disappointed on how it passed. The code was full of redundancy code The purpose of code review is to solicit feedback from peers to improve code quality and avoid code smells. If you have ideas around those, you should contribute them to the ...


0

It's normal for people to not take negative criticism well. It's also quite common for people to not give negative criticism without upsetting others. There are key points when it comes to performance reviews. There should be no surprises. If there are issues with your work, it should be dealt with when it happens. It should not be in your review ...


2

As somebody who has worked in research and now is team lead in a consulting company: Research and development has harsher (sometimes fair, sometimes unfair) feedback The statement about you not being cut out for research may be honest or not, and in case it is honest it may be a misestimation or not, and in case that it is honest and not a misestimation, it ...


9

Start looking for a new job There's a lot to address here and by reading the comments I see you're trying to create a scenario in which you continue working under this supervisor. The most important thing is that you start looking for a new job yesterday. (But don't quit until you've landed one) It's clear your supervisor wants you to quit by his own words:...


0

So my question is, how best do I handle this? It's always hard to answer this as best in this case very much depends on a lot of factors that we don't really know given that we know so little about you. The best advice I can give would be to talk to your manager about these grievances that you have. Specifically you don't want to be "On Call" so to speak ...


-3

To spare you the details, I make small mistakes at work sometimes (coming in 30 mins early instead of an hour early like I said I would, getting in 15-20 mins late because of traffic (this happened twice total), not giving myself enough time to organize the overwhelming amount on my plate in lab at times)... but I don't think I've ever seriously ...


3

I cannot really judge you (or your performance) from here, but surely I can say a thing or two about your supervisor's behavior: Given that they are supposed to be managing and guiding you (you're being a new recruit in an entry level position), and them saying things like He doesn't know if I can fix what's wrong even if I tried and qualifications weren't ...


2

In addition to the other good answers, I would say that you should talk to your CTO about how this is bad for the company. You are, as you say, a single point of failure. If you decide to leave then the company will have nobody with the expertise to maintain the systems. The CTO should see this as an unacceptable level of risk (and you merely mentioning the ...


10

Handling these types of emergencies, and working late to get them sorted out, is normal for members of ops teams. For me, it took a while to adjust to this style of working. But, believe me, you can adjust if you give it some time. If you get loopy when you're hungry, keep an emergency stash of energy bars in your work place. They help a lot. Just keep in ...


3

It is normal. There are workplaces where you will get a bunch of friends, and workplaces where you don't. Among other factors, it depends on: Life stage Time spent at work Commitments outside work Prior experience or places, for example coworkers coming up from the same school, or co-nationals in an otherwise foreign crowd


3

This is entirely subjective and personal. I personally don't make friends at work. For no other reason than I'm a bit of an introvert and am a person who prefers solitary activities (other than being in the company of my family). I'm friendly and get along well with my colleagues, but I am not friends with them. I don't seek to create friendships or to ...


13

What do you consider to be friends with someone? I've been friendly towards most of the people I've worked with over my career, and polite to almost the rest of them ( unfortunately, there have been some people that really strain my reserves of bring polite), but I would say I've only been friends with a very small number of people I've worked with. So, is ...


2

So my question is, how best do I handle this? Make a list of the things that you think are unreasonable. Come up with potential solutions to those issues. Present them to your boss. If your boss doesn't acknowledge and address them and doesn't attempt to at least find some middle ground then find a job elsewhere. Your boss may not be willing to do anything ...


20

I understand that as SysAdmin I will occasionally have to work overtime, possibly at short notice, but this amount is clearly unsustainable for my health, and strikes me as unreasonable. Why do you think that it's unreasonable? Are the failures non-critical? Can the company carry on until tomorrow without them, and without suffering any substantial ...


Top 50 recent answers are included