New answers tagged

19

Unwritten rules are learned in a few different ways. By experience. All workplaces are different but they some share culture, domain, and socio-economic commonalities. If you've worked in one finance firm, others will likely be similar. If you've worked in one laboratory, others will be similar. If you've worked in one factory... you get the idea. By ...


6

By observation: Do some googling, get an understanding of what unwritten rules are out there in the world, then see which of them fit with what you see of your new workplace/co-workers. By asking: In a 1-on-1 setting, at an appropriate point in your conversation/whatever you're doing, ask the person you're with "Hey, since I'm new, is there anything I ...


0

The easy way to learn anything is to ask nicely. You will get a lot of information. However, you have to be very careful when considering un-written anything - there might be very good reasons why it is not written. And the usual reason why rules are not written is that they are either immoral, unethical, or downright illegal. So it is very likely that ...


4

By mingling (knowing the new colleagues, speaking with them more and more, being nice with them and developing professional association), you can understand the unwritten rules.


0

Generally, employees don't 'rise and fall' through the ranks roller-coaster style through a typical 20 year stretch. Even 'loud' (which I'll take to mean self-touting and confident) employees don't. In my mind, this is likely due to one thing: inability to understand your own weaknesses and limitations. In other words, it sounds like you accepted positions, ...


2

This really depends on how much you want the job. There are really 3 or 4 ways you can go about this, ranking from most likely to still keep you in consideration for the job to least likely. Note that I don't agree with all of these suggestions I'm going to give, I'm just listing your options and providing some context for each one: Ignore it. Maybe they ...


0

There are, as you suspect, some benefits and some drawbacks to this strategy. Benefits include less time spent in arguing, unwanted small talks, and other unpleasant social interactions. You may have more time to focus and work if you have a lesser number of people accustomed to working or socializing with you regularly. If the ones you block out are a ...


1

In the Netherlands I've had the impression that it is considered polite for managers to give staff at least a chance to break the news themselves. It's probably culture-dependent, but given your long notice period, maybe you are in Europe too? As a (possibly extreme) example, there was a case where a coworker had not told colleagues about his leaving even ...


21

Is my boss allowed to tell my coworkers that I have resigned, before I even got a chance to tell them? Yes. You don't own the news of your resignation. It really doesn't seem fair Maybe not. If you had asked them not to share the information until you personally told your coworkers yourself, they may or may not have agreed to do so. What happened might ...


-2

Is my boss allowed to tell my coworkers that I have resigned,before I even got a chance to tell them?! It really doesn't seem fair Yes they can do it, even if it doesn't seem fair. Next time you want to resign and want your coworkers to hear it from you first, you tell them before you tell your boss. Alternatively, you can ask your boss to allow you to ...


4

The fact that you're leaving could very well be relevant. idk what you do for a living but let's say you're a software developer. If you're leaving in three months then you're not the best person to assign a six month project to. It might be prudent for your manager to retask you with writing documentation for the work that you've done and fixing bugs in ...


74

Your boss is responsible for making decisions that benefit the company, not ones that benefit you personally. Your boss doesn't need your permission. You are leaving the company, your boss informs staff so they can prepare. It's not your decision at all. I don't know what else to say. It's pretty common for a boss to let managers know immediately and get ...


2

While it sounds like the TV/Movies has been covered, there's a few things I wish someone had told me (or maybe they did and I just did listen) when I started working at 15. This is going to mostly be anecdotal, but I feel like thats okay for this questions. I'm going to go off the assumption that you are not working to sustain yourself, just have a little ...


-1

Assuming you're 16 and you got your first job, I wouldn't stress much. Chances are you're going to quit in a couple of months. So it's not really important. If anything you should take a good look around you. If you're 16, and you're going to work to make money to spend on things while you have a good life at home with your parents, look at how others are ...


7

Very broad question, however I will try to help you by refuting some inaccuracies that are displayed in some specific series or films. Friends when having a full-time job, you won't have the time/energy to hang out every day with your friends in a cafe before work. Emily in Paris you will not be send to Paris and be able to work there as marketing-genius ...


13

I'm going to take a stab at this without knowing the precise profession - so it's going to be a bit generic. First up, the most important thing to understand: your main objective is to make your boss look good and make their job easier. This might sound strange, but think about it this way - your boss has a series of objectives they're supposed to achieve; ...


-5

What should a new-to-the-workforce teenager be aware of before joining the workplace? Minding their manners. The rest is easy.


0

Where I work it is common to name a substitute person when you go on vacation. There is even a field for the substitute's name and e-mail address in the vacation booking form on the intranet. Even if it's not official, you can still verbally agree with a colleague working on similar topics to act as each other's replacement when going on vacation. At this ...


-1

I would suggest to order audit on everything this one do and did in the company. Dishonesty tends to manifest in more than one way. You may find several reasons of firing him for cause and start legal proceedings. Even If not - fire him in a way that limits his opportunity to harm your company and its products. Complete offsite backup, disabling all his ...


0

To do what you're asking might be best handled before you go on holidays. On the day before you go, tell everyone, "hey folks I'm going to be out of contact for the next week, so if there's anything you need will you let me know now?" Then at least you can "miss" their calls and then text them back later (maybe after hours? so they don't ...


0

Going against the grain Saying to their faces "I am not going to work during my vacation" will make me appear too full of myself, as this is not the norm in this workplace. If you go against the norm, no matter the topic, you're going to rub people the wrong way when those people expect you to adhere to the norm. Whether that's about after hours ...


2

Build a culture of shared knowledge, and shared system ownership In companies with a business need for great uptime - Amazon, gmail, youtube - there's no important knowledge that lives only in one person's head. After all, if there were any secrets only one person knew or problems only one person could solve: If they're not on call, they could have driven ...


4

Your situation is in no way specific to you being such a high performer. The solution is the same as for any other person, and pretty simple: Make sure that everybody who needs that information knows about your vacation. What I do is that about 2 weeks before the vacation, whenever I have a more intense discussion with someone, I shortly mention the ...


48

An angle that is not well touched on in the other answers is culture. Israeli culture and company culture will both come into play here. If the regional and company culture is such that you are expected to behave in a certain way, failing to do so is an obvious risk in terms of relationships (regardless of how things work in America or western Europe). ...


0

I've asked this in a comment on your question, but regardless of what you may want, your work contract and/or company HR policies may very clearly state that you must be contactable at all hours. If they do, then you can do nothing about this state of affairs, except find another job. If your contract/HR explicitly specify that there is no expectation around ...


5

How do I not hurt them? How do I not hurt myself? How do I not appear to be "non-cooperative"? I didn't even make sure this isn't urgent, and frankly I don't think it should matter. How do I make sure this is the last time, or at least make them think hard before doing this again? I understand your dilemma as that you really want to respect your ...


0

Vacations is your time designed for you to rest from work so you will be able to maintain your sanity and work more effectively. Period. Your response shall be adequate to your behaviour on the workplace.I copy flexi's and Hilmar's answers. Tell your colleagues you are to be on vacation; set automatic response. In emergency be responsive to your superior's ...


6

What you want to do is unrealistic. There may be an emergency only you can deal with or other very valid reason for disturbing you. However you should not be contactable by colleagues. Just ignore any attempts by them. If your manager contacts you then that is different. It means that it has been escalated to a higher level before bugging you with it.


32

Saying to their faces "I am not going to work during my vacation" will make me appear too full of myself, as this is not the norm in this workplace. That's it. You can do it politely. Most e-mail system have an automated reply feature for that exact purpose. "I'm currently out of the office with limited access to e-mail and messaging. I will ...


0

If I don't know what is the issue, I assume it can wait until I'm back they just called and didn't leave a message the message has no details: "Are you available" / "There is an issue" Maybe they will contact me again to give some details, only then will I call them back. If it's the first time I'll call back and explain things briefly ...


90

I send an email to all my colleagues a few days before going on vacation (also setup an auto responder, and a similar worded one for external contacts (clients)). It says something similar to: I will be on annual leave from start_date and returning on the return_date. If you need me for anything urgent please contact the project_manager. Please re-send any ...


9

How to refuse to work when on vacation while keeping relationships as best as possible? You want to establish a boundary with your boss and management that while you are on holiday you should not be reachable about work. Your problem is that you are expected to be, and that's expectation from both your management and teammates (with the business benefiting ...


1

You should only fail if you exaggerate your skill and can't live up to your mouth. That's the difference between coming across as confident and competent versus 'just a loud mouth'. But either way expect a mark on your back and have strategies to deal with it. Where is the sweet spot ? The sweet spot is anywhere up until your arrogance outstrips your ...


2

The managment told me recently that they would give the rest of the team a new task and they want me to not get involved into it in order to see how the team is functioning without me. This sounds like they want to see if there are any gaps in the team's ability to handle projects without you. It's good business to avoid having any business functions with ...


6

How to react if the team accepts you as leader but the managment tells you to back off? If you were in fact the official leader of your team, you would expect your teammates to respect your decisions. They may not always like your decisions, but they should feel free to discuss them with you, and understand that leaders bear the ultimate responsibility. ...


3

Leonidas, I suspect that you have some still-unresolved issues with that company that are coming back to visit you because they're still unresolved. Okay, why don't you start by closing your manager's office door and trying to explain your position to him or her, just as you've tried to do here with us? Maybe your manager will want to think about it. Maybe ...


13

I would avoid it. There is very little to gain and you risk coming out looking like you can't navigate office politics. The safest bet here is going with a generic "I'm looking for opportunity for advancement" without going into why you feel jilted.


Top 50 recent answers are included