341

What could I have said to keep the interview going? Anything you would have said would have been a waste of your time at this point. Shrug it off and keep looking; you can't win them all. The manager had made it perfectly clear that A) he wasn't interested in hiring you and B) he wasn't very good at communicating.


192

That's totally normal and appropriate and shouldn't freak you out. Good managers frequently have weekly one-on-one's with all their direct reports. It's a way of ensuring that you have time with the manager every week to talk about what you're doing, get advice, bring up any issues that the manager can help with, etc. Everyone has things they could be ...


163

I wanna know that what could I say to prove that he couldn’t fire me on my last day cause I already gave him my 2-week notice As you are an at-will you can be fired pretty much for any reason, and not showing up (without giving adequate notice/excuse) is definitely on the "can be fired for" list. Though in fairness it seems like your boss wanted ...


160

This manager didn't want to hire you. We have no idea why that would be the case, but there is no reason to believe that it must be because your education. I would assume that this interviewer was older and more experienced than you, and had plenty of themes ready to reject you in a painful way. If the next interviewee comes along with plenty of practical ...


151

Short answer: No. To start with, you are assuming the employer thinks you are more competent than you actually are. They have, however, tested you and know exactly on what ground you stand. Never try to guess what others are thinking, never. What if they know you are not exactly what they wanted but valued your character (they will pay extra attention to ...


142

First of all, never count future dates as part of your experience, that's a lie. You never gained the experiences from the future dates, on the date you are claiming to have the experience. You are supposed to present the existing experience, not the probable future one based on some random assumption. That said, in the current scenario, a 2-month gap ...


129

It seems like a dreadful idea. Here's a few things that will happen, in addition to your developers and testers starting to hate each other and yourself for introducing this: Everyone will focus on low hanging fruit. This means that QA will start reporting all sorts of stuff that's actually fine but might be construed to be "buggy" in hopes of getting paid, ...


127

I did a series of talks on what makes code simple and readable. There is no absolute answer. Much depends on the vocabulary the reader brings. Take for example: bool retval; if (x > 0) { retval = true; } else { retval = false; } return retval; Compare this to return (x>0); To the complete beginners it's possible the first seems simpler, more ...


125

No, this isn't typical in any workplace. You have a successful website that you built - $6,000 per year in ad revenue is nice. That, plus your bug fixing ability, and the new software you're building from scratch, are certainly enough to find you a better paying job in a company where you can actually learn from professional developers. I'd recommend ...


125

It's very easy to explain indeed: it's just a rounded up number. Nobody's asking you how many days, hours, and minutes you worked. For all intents and purposes 3 years 10 months is the same as 4 years. Edit: Of course, as per one of the comments below, if you're prompted for a month count, then you have to be rigorous of your current count of months ...


113

Most decent companies use a “band” when looking at experience, they ask for 5 years and may accept 3 with other factors. Put 36 months and explain at interview if you get one. Any good HR will be able to look at the experience and decide.


110

I read an idea for increasing productivity in a company. It went like this: Have a certain fund, that will be a bonus. Say $100,000. For each tangible bug found, the testers get paid $5 - $15. Whatever's left over at the end of the month/year goes to the Devs. It seems like a wonderful enough idea in theory, though I'm not sure how well it ...


108

You pretty much answer your own question: However, as a candidate perspective, I feel it's unethical to put something on table as my experience which I never had. This is true and you should stick to your own ethics. Don't put it on there. While it may help to get more interviews, the on-site recruiter or people you'll have the interview with should very ...


106

Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to a human if you get an interview I rarely say this. But in this case, you have what a human would regard as 3 years of experience. A human will understand. A computer regards 35.75 months experience as identical to 24.0 months. Obviously this is wrong. Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to any human you talk ...


103

Many, many years ago I got my first real technical job, and it emerged soon after I was hired that they'd mistaken me for a DOS expert (whereas in reality, I'd almost never used a PC before, having almost exclusively used Apple ][s, ZX-80s and -81s, Ataris, etc.). (Yes, this was that long ago.) When I realized that they'd mistaken me for a DOS expert, I ...


102

I think your experience is fairly common - I'm sure I'm not alone in having searched for an issue and found my OWN answer to it on Stack Exchange. I've got nearly 20 years in the industry now and while I feel like I have a lot of memory of it, it's often not until coming across old work documents or speaking to somebody do they remind me of a project/...


95

Since you are under contract, you should review your contract to make sure there are no clauses related its expiration that might require certain actions from you. (I am not a lawyer, so if you have questions about it, you should contact someone qualified to interpret contracts.) If there is nothing in your contract obligating you to provide some kind of ...


90

Why does it even matter? If what he asks doesn't help you, then ignore it. You're not quitting for it to be a benefit to him. You're quitting to benefit yourself. Strictly speaking, if you haven't resigned, he can legally claim you're staff, or consider you an employee without actually paying you, or just use your headcount to benefit himself, or commit ...


89

No, it is not unreasonable to state your compensation requirements early in the interview process. It saves both you and the interviewers from wasting time by talking about a job you wouldn't have taken anyway because the pay is too low. In fact it is not unusual to state your salary requirements right in your application. Many companies even ask for this. ...


83

So what does "3 years commercial" exactly mean? Typically, it means you have worked in that role professionally for 3 years, for a company that is trying to sell a product and make money. That distinguishes you from someone who played with python for 3 years at home, went to school and learned about python for 3 years, or worked on an open-source project ...


82

This is not an average software development job, and you're right on the mark in guessing in what ways it differs. A typical such job will generally: Pay far more. Be well organized with a clear structure of management and processes. Have far less turn-over. Not care if you're 5 minutes late, let alone if you reached the door on time but your desk 5 ...


81

on what basis does this level gets calculated, obviously years but how exactly? I'm going to challenge your assertion here - "years of experience" is in many cases a terrible measure of a developer. I've worked with developers who after 10 years of "experience" are still not much above junior level and still need handholding through their tasks, and ...


79

Probably being sarcastic - With I listed every buzzword I could think of under my skill-set, and I jazzed up my work in high school for my dad's company And The interview was very short To me it's clear, in interview they simply confirmed that buzzwords in your resume are just that - buzzwords; and wrapped it up giving you a light warning. but ...


78

This is going to be an unusual situation. Most employers will take "My work at my last job was confidential so I can't discuss many aspects of it" at face value so long as they have confirmed with HR that you did in fact work there. If an interviewer won't accept what you are telling them as truth, state it as clearly and sincerely as possible. If they ...


78

Why do interviewers ask leadership questions even for “follower” positions? Because they suck at interviewing. You can dress it up as much as you want but the specific instances you describe are typical of novice interviewers who are just going through the motions or following a script. Now, that's not to say that it can't be useful to poll for this kind ...


77

No. It's barely 'experience'. It wouldn't help you in any way shape or form and would only subtract. "I see you have only two weeks lasted in this last one..." "Oh boy, I sure dodged a bullet!" into the trash it goes


74

I wouldn't say it's normal, but that's not what you have to work with. What I would do is give them tasks. Find things that need to be done and task them with it. Offload some of your work on them if you think they can handle it. Train them the process your company uses to do business. All of this will be a learning experience. Based on the tone of your ...


72

Since you have no experience besides help desk type roles, I suggest you take this as an opportunity to learn and get experience on your resume. After 2 years, look for a new job. It's very difficult for someone that only has help desk experience to land a junior developer position. Most people try to get their foot in the door with a helpdesk job and try ...


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