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I wouldn't call my self an experience expert here, but I'm surprised not to see someone suggesting that you talk to your team, understand why they choose the hours they do and what their underlying interests are. For example, one may be taking children to/from childcare or school, another may be caring for an elderly relative, another might be flying off to ...


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We had a similar situation with flexible hours and a distributed team and dealt with it by having standups at a specific time where people were most likely to be around, but on a specific Slack channel. Standups were either via video if people were working from home, or just by text chat. We also did traditional face-to-face standups when attendance made it ...


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After your edit the answer is clear: In your particular case, you could reject the change to your contract. And many of your colleagues did. Or you could give in, accept the change, get actually much worse conditions than were announced, and kick yourself for not speaking up. Which the rest of your colleagues did. Lesson to be learned: Stand up for ...


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From https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-0-387-79948-3_2139 Frustration tolerance is the ability to withstand obstacles and stressful situations. That's what it is. Basically, the employee foresees stress in your job and wants you to be able to handle it. If this is acceptable and normal depends on the employee, and is usually ...


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What you should consider from your description. The night shift counts as two days - but remember you are working on two days in this night shift. The day you start and the day you finish. You will not exceed 22 days per month. This is not less than during a normal "day-only shift" job. So, I was wondering am I going to get more free time than doing ...


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17:30-9:30 is 16 hours with 2 hour break sounds brutal. Employment law differs from country to country and sometimes state to state wrt how long you can legally work for and this tends to come from a health and safety perspective. My summary: Assuming an average of 21.7 working days per month (365 x 5/7 / 12), not accounting for holidays 8 x 16 hours (...


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Let's do the maths here... You say they want you to do these overnight double-shifts 6-8 times a month. Working from 17.30 to 9.30 with a 2-hour break adds up to 14 hours of work. If the shifts do count as 2 days, then that's an average of 7 hours "per day" for 16 days. The normal shift is 9.00 to 17.30 - assuming a typical 30 minute lunch break, that is 8 ...


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