114

If you have to ask, it is pretty safe to assume you are on a death march. I'm not sure what else there is to say. Discouraging vacation is a pretty clear-cut sign. Overtime for more than a few weeks with no sign of adjusting by hiring or decreasing work is a pretty clear-cut sign. And I expect you feel as though you can't decline overtime without someone ...


96

Can a non-drinker be a decent bartender? I will say: Yes. I'm a non-drinker and I've made my own award-winning Lemoncello liqueur. Your problem is the loss of credibility. Be straight-forward with this problem - this shows confidence in your skill. When you get the "favorite drink" question then state that you don't drink but don't stop there. Actively ...


82

You're asking a couple of different questions, so I'll dive right into it: Should you keep complaining? Yes! It's a horrible feeling leaving something on your desk and not knowing whether you'll find it again the next day. It erodes confidence in the team, and generally makes for an unpleasant environment. Imagine the stress of realizing you forgot your ...


50

You can buy a small alarm and install it inside your drawer for a few weeks. Something like this: The alarm is on hold in presence of magnetic field, so you'll still be able to open the drawer without setting it off if you hold a magnet nearby. Someone opening your drawer without a magnet will certainly attract some attention, unless the theft happens after ...


33

You mention this is a small company, and nothing in your description indicates you're in a death march in the sense of a project which is so large or unpredictable that no amount of extra resources will make it complete on time. But clearly there is a problem with expectations. But at this point I've now worked probably 50-60 hours of overtime in the past ...


32

There's really nothing you can do if the company (which security represents) refuses to do anything. You're on company property. I learned a long, long time ago to never leave anything at my desk that I couldn't lock up. Your desk at work is about as secure as your front yard: anyone walking by can take whatever they see with little possibility of ...


26

To be honest, I would have thought that it wouldn't be a problem. Try to make it a not so important matter If it's is a recurring interview problem you have, maybe you should try to act like it's not a big deal and try to answer the questions in order not to lie but still have a "correct" answer. Example : What is your favorite cocktail ? Answer : I ...


26

In many food service positions it's helpful and in many cases necessary to taste what you're serving so you understand how different quantities affect the taste as well as what a "good" and "bad" one tastes like. Yes, you are generally going to be expected to taste alcohol because otherwise you can't answer questions like My friend told me to try ____ ...


24

Am I supposed to stop my career and try other jobs? Yes. Since you indicated in a comment that you must avoid all alcohol ("medical issues, i MUST avoid alcohol, even a "tear"") I suspect you would be far safer abandoning alcohol-related jobs altogether. Find a career where you won't consume any drops of alcohol, even accidentally, for your own medical ...


22

I get the feeling that whether the company is on a Death March or not, isn't the issue here. You are worried that your company is making you do more than you agreed to, without talking about adequate compensation for the investment you are making. You have given the company 50-60 hours of your time above what you have agreed to. If they are historically not ...


15

And I'm sure it's the overnight cleaners as they move a lot of stuff on desks when they come in. From a business perspective, this should be addressed up front. This is a bigger issue than headphones going missing - if employees left competitive or sensitive information lying out, a janitor could easily steal and sell or exploit that information. That's why ...


13

You need to have a direct discussion with your boss. Before going in, decide what you want the outcome to be. What is the outcome you desire? What's the real problem here? Do you begrudge the unpaid hours - would you be happy if you worked the same hours but got paid straight time? Is the issue that you want to have a life outside of work, and thus ...


12

From the comments, it sounds like you get tripped up by a question like What is your favorite cocktail/beer? A perfectly reasonable question for any job interview. /sarcasm Answer truthfully, but don't focus on your personal preference. A solid response might be: Honestly, I don't drink, however, my favorite cocktail to make is my take on an old-...


12

AndreiROM's answer is excellent but I wanted to add one thing. You need to log incidents. Specific dates and items. You also need to talk to your co-workers and get the same information from them. If you go to management and say "a couple of pairs of headphones went missing" there is not much they can do. If you go in and say "there's a pattern of stuff ...


11

Especially in a small company that shouldn't be very hard to find out. I imagine there are business plans, budgets, targets, milestones, key customers, etc. and most companies will share those freely or even communicate these pro-actively on a regular basis. If this is not made available, ask your management. If they share the information you can study it ...


10

You don't need to detail your whole life history here above a few basics. Simply put: Hi Bob, I'm a new team member here and I've been told to ask you to assign me some work items. Could you please assign some work items to me and point me toward any relevant documentation. FYI, I've had x years experience in It does seem a bit strange that you've not ...


8

Yes. It is reasonable for them to refuse to hire you as a bartender if you have a drinking problem or if they have reason to think you might develop one. In some of your other posts, you say that you "used to go for a beer once a week" and "Recently I tried a custom cocktail from my barman", suggesting that your sobriety is fairly recent. There is a ...


7

I think there are multiple issues, and you are paying too much attention to the wrong one. If your working hours and pay were appropriate, it would not matter how much or little your boss was doing. Instead, raise the issues of excessive overtime and insufficient pay for your current experience and productivity. Both would be issues even if your boss was ...


7

I can't speak for the state of the company, but I can certainly speak for the state of your employment: The moment you felt the need to ask this question, you were done there. Resign and find a job with employers who will respect you as a human being!


6

I will share that unfortunately, in the tech (i.e. software) industry, it's becoming "the new normal" to be a salaried employee with salary based on 40 hour weeks, with an expectation that you work 50 hour weeks. This has become commonplace. "The new normal" is one of those weasel catchphrases akin to "work-life balance," which really is code for "you're ...


6

If I was a manager, I would not. I would, instead, consider you as a keeper and a hard worker. Young and single fellows can quit and look for other companies, might be several times a year, with no problem (live off their savings - one person only). In the other hand, you can not since you have responsibilities. This does not mean I will take advantage of ...


5

I would generally not hire a non-drinker as a bartender any more than I'd hire a non-smoker to work in a cigar shop or a vegan to cook steaks at my steakhouse. There's no reason to hire someone with 2nd hand information and no practical knowledge. If you want that job, you should bring something more to the table than "I don't enjoy the product I serve. ...


5

If you are able to work the job of two men with the pay of less than two men, what is your employers incentive to hire? Go on Christmas vacation and make your boss realize this is not suistainable. He will either hire someone or allow the bubble to pop and you can be the last man out of a burning building.


5

From my experience, I would say it would tend to harm your wife's career more than yours because of the perception that she has to take off more time to tend their needs. Of course most women I know who have that many children do not work outside the home. I have not yet seen a man who had a large family discriminated against, I have seen that they often ...


4

I do think you should report this, you may not be the only one who has had things stolen. It is not about the cost of the item stolen, it is about the principle of things. One should not have to worry about theft from their desk at work. If you want to be less confrontational about it, request a lock for your drawer and mention the thefts as the reason. You ...


4

While Snow's answer is correct, I would go a little further. Rather than write and ask for work, write and ask for a chat to discuss what work you should do. As you mentioned, telling him your experience might be helpful. More importantly, you want a discussion of the project (and the documentation is never complete, correct or up to date). If you meet, ...


3

Unless your boss is out of the office most of the time looking for clients, then I would say you are definitely doing all the work and he's living off your sweat. This isn't uncommon even in small companies. It's also quite likely that he is doing other work which isn't part of the company and therefore you don't get a look at and keeping all that revenue ...


3

Is there a specific target date that the company is trying to meet, or is tHis final push before product release (which may be the same thing)? If so this isn't sustainable and they need to either bring on more manpower or re-scale the project or go for incremental release if that's possible... but it may not be a death march.


2

You are asking the wrong question. My question is - how do you figure out if you're on a "Death March"? Basically a time when the company has seriously misjudged or promised something that is essentially unsustainable. At the current point of time, you are not in a position to answer what state the company is in: But at this point I've now worked probably ...


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