New answers tagged

7

Technically you would punch in 'n' minutes earlier/later and punch out 'n' minutes earlier/later and therefore balance itself out. The clock could be wrong by any amount of time. It will however make time tracking difficult when people will look on the card, but I assume people would be aware of it going wrong, and also it's easy to prove. What matters is ...


1

My current salary per hour is very bad too since the overtime is not paid (it's illegal to work more than 10 h a day here, so it couldn't even be paid). This is highly illegal. Unless you are taking major breaks (for example going to the gym, getting lunch, running errands..etc) the company MUST pay you. It would help knowing which country you are from, ...


7

Should I still talk to them? Or quit? (Honestly, when working 12-14h you just don't have time to apply while employed). It sounds like you have already talked to them and gotten nowhere. So start looking for your next job now. If you truly cannot seek a new job while working 12-14 hours, then stop working that many hours. Just leave earlier and get your ...


0

You're salaried. You're paid for your work-product, not your time at the desk. If you require less than 40 hours to complete your work, you get that time back. Conversely if it takes you more than 40 hours a week to do your work, you generally aren't entitled to overtime (at least for most jobs that require a Masters). Double check to ensure that you are ...


0

You understand why you work those hours, but at first glance, your hours seem ridiculous. Working 8-5 pm or 9-6 pm M-F are standard working, so not considered ridiculous by most people. You'll have to convince your new boss why your hours aren't ridiculous for what you do and why standard working hours are ridiculous to you. You can bring in others to help ...


0

I'm confused as to how you translated: As an exempt employee, you will be expected to work additional hours as required by the nature of your work assignments. into: still go into the office out of hours regularly, including weekends If you get all of your work done during 9am - 6pm then there should be no overtime. You need to learn how to not ...


7

I would start looking for a new job. I am not saying you should quit your job or accept the new one. But looking for one might tell you a lot. Update your resume and put it on job sites your company doesn't use. When you get recruiters interested, make it clear they are not to talk to your current employer (and make it clear that you'll need really good ...


14

It's quite likely that nobody told your new boss that you were working "non standard" hours, especially if it was an informal arrangement with your previous boss. When people take on a new management position, they tend to get briefed about the problems, not the things that are going right, and from your account you weren't creating any problems. Unless ...


0

The deal with every job is: The company gives you cash, you give the company your time. In addition, hopefully the company (or your team, your manager, or just the job) gives you enjoyment. Your new manager is trying to change the equation. He wants to reduce your enjoyment by reducing your freedom. He wants more of your time, and of course without more ...


77

First thing I'll say is, don't be in a rush to quit your job. A lot of people on this stack are inclined to respond to almost any major issue by saying that you should start looking for a new position. It may happen that you wind up forced into that, but you have other options to explore first. As others have noted, you should have a discussion with your ...


24

Now I have a boss, who just started at the company, and they are trying to use the following paragraph in my contract to insist that I be in the office 9 - 6 Mon - Fri, be on call 24/7, still go into the office out of hours regularly, including weekends, while maintaining my current level of productivity and without additional remuneration: "...


1

Explain to your boss that your current level of productivity stems from the fact that you are working in "task mode". If you switch to hours, your productivity will change. In general, you cannot, at the same time, have assignments and work strict hours. There are bosses who would like to have the best of both worlds but it usually fails miserably.


2

What is the best way to push back against this? Talk to the new boss and try to negotiate the conditions. If you are already on call 24/7 you can argue that there is no need to come into the office off hours as you can complete the work from home ( as you have been doing so ). If you don't want to be on call 24/7, you can suggest an on call rotation ...


3

It really depends on what business strategy is on his mind. If he wants everyone in the office between 9am to 6pm or other specific hours, there won't be much you can do about it. Although, if the 'expected additional hours' are not paid, I would suggest to stop going in the office on the weekends.


4

Also I am one of the first people to arrive everyday at 9am while they are usually late. Well, there you go. They are arriving later and staying later. You are arriving earlier and leaving earlier. You're working the same amount of hours. Why would you feel bad leaving earlier when you started earlier? Makes no sense.


2

Sounds to me like this is a company that might have a "flexible working hours" policy, where they don't care so much about when you get there and when you leave, as long as you put the hours in. You get there earlier, you get to leave earlier - get there at 9am, leave at 6pm; get there at 10am, leave at 7pm; get there at 7am, leave at 4pm. You can check ...


-1

What should be done in such cases? How to explain them that we also require some mental peace to relieve stress. Or this is the time to reconsider my future at this company? If your key responsibility to be available all the time whenever required for the client then attending these meetings falls under this responsibility. That being said, if you don't ...


1

I think you need to look at the situation from the client's side as well and remember that this is not an ideal situation for either side. Being in a situation where you are working with different teams across such a drastic timezone difference and different companies is always difficult. You are asking how to avoid client calls after work hours but on the ...


-1

Have an honest conversation with your boss. I bet you're not the only person who doesn't want to have to work late and there's a good chance he/she has already spoken with other members of your team about this exact issue. If one of my employees were in this situation, I might let her come in late the next day or work from home on the day of a late night ...


4

Every project / assignment has it's own demands. That includes the shift / work timing. Ideally, you should have been made aware of the work timing for this project before you joined, if you were not - ask your manager. Considering you're taking about work-life balance (and not only looking for overtime payment), and as you mentioned these are status ...


-4

In a normal situation, I would suggest becoming unavailable. Don't answer your phone or keep it on silent, if you have any instant messaging app on your phone then remove them, only check your emails at work etc. However it sound like you are expected to be available. If that the case and your manager's voice is not getting heard then I will suggest ...


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