101

NO This is a bad idea which could get you in trouble. The way to handle it is to go back and say something along the lines of sending an email to your current manager, copying in anyone appropriate asking for approval to share the document. Update from comments: I want to make it clear that there should be no doubt in your mind that sending the document ...


36

I have largely the same experience as yourself (except the homeschooling bit). Did great in college, enjoyed college, used to spend much of my free time programming artificial neural networks and writing software. Started work at a software company and my urge to do that kind of stuff died. They weren't horrible, the hours weren't bad but it was still ...


23

Generally, a baby is brought to an office for a short time when the parent (who works there) wants to show it off to the other people in the office. As long as security requirements allow that, there is really nothing wrong or unprofessional or unusual about it. It is not usually because the parent doesn't have child-care. It is a normal social ...


22

If you still have enough money if it is only 75% or even 50% of your current salary, you can think about working part-time which means 30h or even 20h per week. Having worked six hours per day a week after a standard 40h week I can say that you really feel the difference. You are fresher, you are less sick and you work more intense. I would even say that I ...


20

The difference between you and someone less capable is the gut-feel that something was wrong. This gut feel is borne by experience, and forged by previous mistakes. The concern needs to shift from blame, onto how this situation can be avoided in the future. The best person to identify the process defect that allowed this issue to pass testing and review by ...


20

No, you should not share your company documents with people who are not working for your company and/or don't have written permission to access them.


18

I think many people go through that phase. Here's some advice from my experience (in no particular order): Have you considered moving abroad? I think there's a lot difference in working culture between countries. I have worked as a programmer in 4 different countries in Europe, and the normal working conditions I encountered are 35-40 hours per week with ...


18

so my ex manager who left our company recently called me up a couple of days back to share a document. Are you someone who makes decisions for your company on what documents to share with outsiders? If not, then this is a red flag. However, im confused whether or not I should share it as he could have easily copied it and taken it while he was working ...


16

One thing no one else seems to mention when discussing the issue of noise in an open office environment is: Management chose to put you into a sub-optimal situation. They are therefore choosing less productivity. Therefore the first thing to do is to stop worrying about the fact that you could do more under better circumstances. When circumstances aren't ...


16

You are in a bad spot. Some people are very particular about what they want in their office environment. I, for instance, want sunlight. I don't care about a private office, noise, or how many stairs I have to climb, but I need to be able to see the sun. Your colleague got completely bashed by your manager, and he's mad. Given that he was last in the ...


16

There seems to be quite a bit of wishful thinking going on in some of these answers and comments. The (corporate) world doesn't work the way it should, it works the way it works. Having recently managed several team and floor relocations for around 200 people, introducing hot-desking to several teams at the same time, I came to learn two things: People get ...


15

First off, take a breath. Don't assume priority/severity Start by realizing that you're new, don't know what the company has decided in the past. Your company many have already evaluated this issue and determined that it doesn't matter to them, which would make your severity rating inaccurate. Even if the company cares in general, they may have ...


14

40 hours a week is pretty far from your whole live revolves around the office, and if you've got friendly coworkers, almost never any overtime, you've probably got vastly more free time and a more pleasant workplace than others who don't feel like their whole life revolves around the office. Your life doesn't stop while you're at the office, and resume when ...


12

If he wants your seat, he will have to push you out of it. This means that he will have to go to your manager and have your manager tell you to vacate. State that you were aboveboard and that you picked your seat according to the rule set by your manager. If your colleague mentions that he was traveling, reply that you had nothing to do with his traveling. ...


12

Two things going on here. First: Are you getting clear instructions on what is expected from you? If no, send an email to the guy and CC your boss, asking for guidance or even a checklist. Be civil - make it like you're asking for the help "please help me to ensure I provide what is required". If you do get instructions - make sure you fulfil them 100% ...


12

I would hope that such a project has a bug tracking system. In which case, raise it as an issue, and inform whoever is responsible for that area of the code. There's no need to make a big song-and-dance about it. To be honest, if you're relying on obfuscation for your security, then you've probably got bigger problems.


11

should I try to ignore it, or should I ask for a way to remove the distraction? Distractions can come in many forms: loud conversations, loud phone calls, birthday celebrations, visitors from other departments, odoriferous foods, visiting babies, etc. Most times when a distraction occurs in the office, you should try to ignore it. Some find that ...


11

Your actions and comments have probably signaled to the group that you are not interested, or invested in the job. They probably assume you are planning to leave, or find your to be a bad egg and are distancing themselves from you so as to not be considered hanging with the bad egg. You need to reengage with the work and team, stop coming in late, stop ...


10

Talk to your boss in person. There seems to be a misunderstanding, so you want to have a single conversation with your boss to clear things up and make sure he is making his request from a position of having all the right information. Hello boss, I wanted to check in with you about the earlier incident. If I understand correctly, you want me to apologize to ...


9

This person is trying to steal confidential information by spear phishing. Report this behaviour to your superior immediately. The fact that he does not have access to this document is intentional. If your company wanted ex-employees to be able to access documents, it could easily set this up.


8

It sounds like you are trying to do a job which is your hobby, but what you have found is that your hobby became your job and you are not left with a hobby any more. Fortunately it sounds like you have some other hobbies ("playing games, ... watching tv, building neat things with my construction sets, reading"). Maybe you should focus more on these. I also ...


8

Your ex-manager doesn’t work at the company anymore and has no rights whatsoever to these documents. Tell him as politely as you like that you are not going to send these documents to him. If he tries to reason with you tell him as politely as you like that you are not going to send these documents. Also inform your manager and HR about the request, in ...


7

I'd just let it go. I'm a foster parent, but have not (yet) had an infant placed with us. The youngest so far has been two. I will tell you, though, that if someone brings their infant to the office, that was their absolute last choice. They didn't want to do that, and they tried everything they could think of, first, before bringing them. If you can ...


7

I think your manager is a bit of a joke in this situation. He said go pick and probably didn't figure any harm in it. But now he stands around and makes you deal with it? What a $$#)$*#! A lot of companies have policies in place and groups in companies have policies in place around seating arrangement. At my company and a lot of financial companies it ...


7

IMHO, one of the most important things in a workplace/career is the ability to understand your environment AS WELL as completing all your assignments and tasks on time. You need to be able to judge an office/workplace and know what is and is not acceptable based on your colleagues, managers, clients. Just being able to do the work will get you so far but ...


7

A situation like yours is a good time to start working on backlog items like refactoring code, improving the deployment or setting up a continuous integrationt environment. I.e. things which usually get pushed back as they have no direct business benefit. But you should make sure to tell your boss what you are actually working on. It is his job to know ...


7

In my experience, simply working with people -- asking them for assistance when needed, assisting them in turn, random "how was you weekend"s and the like -- tend to do the job Just Fine unless you're actively hiding. Be friendly (without overdoing it), be a good listener, be helpful, pose interesting and relevant questions, and you sorta can't help getting ...


7

Your job is whatever your boss decides it is. So yes he can assign you any random thing he wants to. You mention some are in the name of career development so those are things he thinks you need to work on to be qualified for promotion. They aren't random things, they are important. Just because they aren't what you wanted to do doesn't make them random. ...


7

One thing you should consider: You have set a shining example of how to properly deal with an issue. Yes there is pain in sorting it but leaving it sounds like it would have been SO much worse. Someone in management needs to stand up and say, in front of all, that they are pleased to be sorting this prior to the production phase and get all to focus on ...


6

As others have said, the issue here isn't whether your feeling is "correct" or not. The feeling is there, you can't logic it away. What you can do is decide how to deal with both the situation and the feeling about the situation in a constructive manner. You've said that you are a very competitive person and that's what drives you. That's not wrong in and ...


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