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I recently decided to leave a job that I enjoyed for an opportunity that fell into my lap from an ex-colleague, who is my new manager.

First week in, I realize that despite being hired as a senior, there are no senior responsibilities. Had I known that this beforehand, I would not have taken the opportunity as it is a step-down for my career compared to where I was. I have talked to the manager about this, but it is clear that the senior title does not mean anything in the new team.

As I left the previous place in the best possible manner, I have a high chance of being accepted back.

The question for me is, should I leave immediately (within the first month) or wait it out 6 months, then leave? Prior would allow me to return to the job I am happy with, but I'd have a month gap in my resume working for the same company, and I would obviously burn bridges. The latter would be more easy to explain and wouldn't burn the bridge as hard (hopefully). I think a 6 month stint is easier to explain than a 1 month stint.

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The question for me is, should I leave immediately (within the first month) or wait it out 6 months, then leave? Prior would allow me to return to the job I am happy with, but I'd have a month gap in my resume working for the same company, and I would obviously burn bridges. The latter would be more easy to explain and wouldn't burn the bridge as hard (hopefully). I think a 6 month stint is easier to explain than a 1 month stint.

If you are planning to go back to your prior company, just do it now. Make sure you will get accepted back first. It's not all that hard to explain that you made a mistake for less than a month.

But realistically, you left your prior job for a reason. Something was lacking that led you to decide to move. Think it over completely, then decide if going back is really your best route.

If not, look for a new job - making sure this one has the appropriate level of responsibilities and other attributes that make sense for you. Don't assume - dig in and ask questions.

Then get and accept an offer. Give the appropriate amount of notice. Then move on to your newest job.

These things happen, but you don't want to make it a habit.

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    Also, I wouldn't lose any sleep over a month or two gap in employment at the other place. It'd be a problem if you quit again in 3 months, or say within a year. But if not, I don't think anyone will remember or split hair over the fact that you were gone for a bit, and you don't have to mention it ever again. – user90842 Jul 19 at 1:11
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To your fears of having a one month gap in your cv : you leave it out, it's as simple as that. You would list your old job as if you've never left. If you get an interview, then you can explain the situation if necessary (and certainly don't lie about it), but a cv is a tool to represent your skills and experience, not an exact timeline of the jobs you've had. Plus, your reason for leaving so soon is very understandable, you should have no trouble explaining this. Here are some good articles of Ask a Manager on this subject.

So unless you really don't want to burn the bridge at your new job, leave now. You can leave that job of your resumé, no problem. If you don't want to go back to your old job, job search now. If you go back to your old job, be prepared to stay there a while (I would say at least a year) as to not burn a bridge there.

As for the new job : would you want to go back to a company that lied to you about the job ? Is it that important to not burn that bridge ? Because if you don't wish to burn that bridge, be prepared to stay there a whole year, not six months.

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There is "doesn't mean anything" and something like "doesn't mean what I think it should, which is that I'm somehow better than the others."

If this is just a company where "rock star" developers aren't required, the other answer is correct -- you should leave now before you can't go back, and before the current employer feels you used them when you leave in 6 months.

But if you are more experienced, and you feel your experience has to be proven because titles don't matter, you have to ask yourself why you feel that way.

There is a lot of missing information in your question. Perhaps they want your skills so you can help others? That's not a bad thing -- mentoring less experienced employees is great experience, especially as you move from mid- to late-career where you'll want to focus more on building co-workers than padding your resume.

My biggest concern is "it is a step-down for my career compared to where I was." Says who? When I was a technical lead, with a bunch of people working under me, I had a really hard time getting engineers to understand just how important a trip through test or product was. I did both of those, sometimes even intentionally, and my career has absolutely not suffered at all.

You need to figure out why you think the new job is a bad thing.

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