3

This question already has an answer here:

My previous employer declared bankruptcy and was closed. My salary in this company was very high as I was holding a top management position (Chief Technology Officer).

I have passed all technical interviews and tests with another company for the position of Technical Manager, and I will have the final HR interview to discuss the financial issues in the next few days. I know that the pay-scale for the Technical Manager position is something around 60% of my last salary and I am fine with this.

My questions:

  1. From an HR perspective, shall I tell them about my last salary (if they ask about it)?
  2. Do you think it would affect my chances for hiring if I was getting a higher salary in my previous work?

marked as duplicate by IDrinkandIKnowThings, yochannah, Jane S, jcmeloni, gnat Jul 30 '15 at 17:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

8

from HR perspective, shall i tell them about my last salary (if they asked about it)?

If at all possible, I would avoid telling them your previous salary. Instead, concentrate on the job itself, the company, your potential role there, and indicate that you will be comfortable with the salary range for the new job (if indeed you are).

do you think it would affect my hiring there if i was getting higher salary in m previous work?

It could.

Hiring managers want to hire people who will be around for a while. Usually, they would rather not be a "placeholder" company - one where someone joins on the rebound from a failed job/company until something better or more lucrative comes along.

It's likely that the new company knows the relative salary ranges for CTOs versus Technical Managers, just as well as you do. So you want to convince them that you like their company, like the position being offered, and like the salary enough to stay around for the long haul. This is almost certainly one of the key issues HR will be discussing with you in your next interview.

1

To add to Joe's answer, you can avoid the question by declining it. You say they offer 60% of your previous salary. You can say your salary range is within that 60% when they ask. For example if your yearly salary was 100k, but the new company was offering 60k, just say, "I'm looking for a salary range of about 60-70k."

You have to make it look like you're in it for the long run, even if you aren't and that you're looking for what they are looking for. Basically you already have a advantage to them because you know what salary range they're looking for but they have no idea of yours.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.