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A little background: Company A, who is located four hours away, has given me a relocation offer. Company B, who is local, has matched Company A's salary with their offer (after negotiating an 8k raise from their initial offer). I have been interviewing and talking with Company C, who is located two hours away and has thrown three job opportunities my way.

Herein lies the dilemma, Company B expects a decision after the weekend (which is a very appropriate amount of time). I was looking to schedule an onsite interview with Company C next week (when their director is available, but after this decision phase with Company B has passed). Although phone interviews and communications have gone well, I have not received an offer from Company C (most likely because of the lack of an onsite interview).

I feel terrible having to do this to Company C, but Company B has given me an offer and it's local, which suits my needs at this point of my career and life.

How should I approach Company C with this information without burning a bridge or coming off unpolitely? Choosing Company B over Company C has nothing to do with trepidation with Company C, but more so because of logistics and where I am at in my life.

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How should I approach Company C with this information without burning a bridge or coming off unpolitely? Choosing Company B over Company C has nothing to do with trepidation with Company C, but more so because of logistics and where I am at in my life.

First, you need to formally accept the final, non-contingent offer from Company B (I'm assuming that's what you plan to do, although you didn't specifically say that in your question), and get everything signed and ready to go.

Then you simply need to talk to Company C and tell them that you have accepted another position. You thank them for considering you, and wish them well in filling their open position. That's polite, professional and won't burn any bridges.

Any reasonable company will understand this and won't hold it against you. Hiring managers understand that timing is everything. They will understand that they didn't make you an offer, you had a great offer in your hand, and you need to make your decision in a timely manner.

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  • This is a doubtful advice since signing an offer before you discussed new information with other companies is not pragmatic. Other company may increase compensation if they really want you. And if you will like their new offer more you will face with an unpleasant necessity to break the existent offer.
    – Riga
    Oct 9 '15 at 16:56

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