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When resigning, I was thinking about adding something similar to the below:

I have accepted a position with another company that will further my growth and development in my career. I have enjoyed working at [company name] however, this new position will challenge my growth and further my career.

Wouldn't this sound rude to the current employer you are resigning from, as it makes it sound that the current employer does not offer a position which can further my career?

Thanks!

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  • VTC as a duplicate of the linked question. Consensus on resignation letters is that they should be short with no value judgements: just simple facts. FWIW the language you use is important. The "however" does indeed reflect negatively on your current employer. "It was an opportunity that I couldn't turn down" or "Offered a position which would be a great next step for my career" doesn't have that. But none of that belongs in a resignation letter. – Lilienthal Jan 29 '17 at 11:20
  • Rereading your question, I can't actually tell if you're talking about a letter (or email to confirm the resignation) or about the conversation you have with your manager. If the latter see: 1, 2 – Lilienthal Jan 29 '17 at 11:21
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The question to think about before doing anything: what goal am I attempting to accomplish here? In this case, I see very little value to be gained from adding that information, and a non-trivial chance that you'll burn bridges with your employer. Just leave it out.

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  • Many thanks. I'm leaving my current position to take a new position as a 'supervisor'. How can I address this in my letter to let my employer know? – Debbie Williams Jan 29 '17 at 9:23
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    You don't. That's a question you either answer in person if you feel comfortable saying so, or not at all. – Philip Kendall Jan 29 '17 at 9:27
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    You don't have to say anything. What you say is "I'm hereby giving you notice of my resignation; my last working day will be xxx". That's it. Not one word more is needed. Everything else you say can and will be used against you. At the most you would add some general niceties about the job and the company. – gnasher729 Jan 29 '17 at 12:22

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