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I am considering changing positions, so I went to an interview and they liked me. That's it.

Now here is the problem, I asked them to see the contract of my employment, and they said that I first have to sign a NDA with them, because their contracts were an object of Authors' rights.

Should I be suspicious, or is this normal for the modern workplace ?

[EDIT] Yes, they did make me an offer, i have not verbally agreed to it yet, because i wanted to first read the contract.

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    Did they actually make you an offer? – cdkMoose Sep 15 '17 at 17:08
  • Yes, they did . – Relive Sep 15 '17 at 17:11
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    What is the big deal if the NDA is you cannot disclose the contract? – paparazzo Sep 15 '17 at 17:12
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    I have seen this on occasion in the USA, doesn't seem odd to me. – Mister Positive Sep 15 '17 at 17:17
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    Be sure the NDA is appropriately limited in scope. I'd also want to see the employee handbook before accepting, as well. Engage an attorney if necessary. – Wesley Long Sep 15 '17 at 17:41
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Should I be suspicious, ... ?

Probably not.

or is this normal for the modern workplace ?

Sometimes, but usually completely unnecessary. Many companies are completely over the top in such matters. Author's rights would normally be covered by copyright, anyway.

However, you MUST be allowed to obtain legal advice concerning your contract of employment!

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    Yes, not unusual to require an NDA to see the contract. It may contain clauses that vary from person to person, or be different than competitors and they do not want those details shared. Yes, lawyer confidentiality should be an exception to the NDA, but that would be for profession legal opinion bound by confidentiality, not armchair lawyers offering an opinion not bound in such a way. – dlb Sep 15 '17 at 20:32
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Now here is the problem, I asked them to see the contract of my employment, and they said that I first have to sign a NDA with them, because their contracts were an object of Authors' rights.

Should I be suspicious, or is this normal for the modern workplace ?

There's nothing to be suspicious of here.

Read the NDA. If you don't understand it, run it by your lawyer first. (Never sign a document you don't understand.)

If it doesn't meet your needs, don't sign it and move on to seek offers from different companies.

If the NDA is okay, then sign it and start reviewing the contract.

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