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I have worked full time with current position for almost 10 years. Due to a change in my husband's work schedule, he will be unable to return home on the weekends (he works in another city and is only home on weekends).

I would like to cut back to a 3 days a week schedule so that I can go to where he is and spend time with him.

This comes up at the start of our busy season at work and my boss is NOT going to be happy with my decision.

What is the best way to approach this with her? I want to stay on a 3 day a week schedule would be ideal.

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    What are his days off now ? Can't you shift you workload like Mon->Fri to Wed->Sun ? So that your workdays match his ? – OldPadawan Aug 4 '17 at 16:01
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    Is he home on the weekends or not? Question shows both "unable to return home on the weekends" and "is only home on weekends". – cdkMoose Aug 4 '17 at 16:32
  • @cdkMoose Reading between the lines, it seems that he normally is home only on the weekends, but now he is unable to, essentially being stuck in the other city. OP linda, could you confirm? – Robert Dundon Aug 4 '17 at 17:01
  • Right now he's m-f and home here on week-ends. But with new schedule his days off will be split and the long drive back home for only day would be very hard on him. I work in retail so week-ends I work either one day or both.. So basically I'd like to work m-w, drive to other city til sunday..Just not sure if boss will understand I'm trying to balance a healthy life with my priorities of work. I am willing to drive back over on the super busy days so not to short staff the team. – linda santos Aug 4 '17 at 17:07
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    I will point out that cutting back to three days is his decision not yours. You are making a request not telling him a decision. Your decision is whether to quit if he is unwilling to let you cut back. – HLGEM Aug 4 '17 at 17:21
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Depending on what your company offers, there may be a "flex" time arrangement where employees can work part-time or work flexible hours (usually outside of normal business hours). You should research if such a policy exists and if it does, then approach her and ask if it's possible to reduce your work hours. If there isn't a policy, then you, her, and HR will have to work something out. Keep in mind that your pay will be docked accordingly. Communication is key.

There could also not be the option to work part-time, in which case you will have to choose between work or family - it's not ideal, but it is reality.

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The one good thing about retail is that there is more than a bit of flexibility, and if you are good, they tend to work with you.

Approach your manager and see if you can work out a compromise that suits both of you. Getting entire weekends off is hard, so you may want to see if you can work opening Saturdays, have Sunday and Monday off, and then close Tuesdays to give you the most time with your husband.

Approach her with several solutions and see how it works. If not, you may want to see if there is a branch near where your husband works, and see if you can split your time between the two stores.

Be creative and see what they will agree to.

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I think the best way to start would be to set up a meeting with your boss (it can be informal) and tell her that you love your job, but you also love your husband. Ask them if there's any way you could reduce your shifts to just a three day work-week. If they say 'yes', great. If not, schedule a more formal meeting where the two of you can work out a compromise. Maybe you can work a three-day week twice a month. And start talking to your coworkers. I don't know what your company's policy is regarding switching shifts, but you might be able to trade around with other employees and cobble together a de facto part-time schedule.

There is another solution if worse comes to worse. If the company won't or can't give you a schedule that works for you and you can't arrange to swap shifts with your coworkers, then (provided your able and willing to do so) you can quit and find another job. Retail is a nice field because schedules can be very flexible if you're upfront during the interview process about your availability.

Either way, good luck!

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