New answers tagged

1

I feel it is uncommon as well, however it seems you (and all of us) are being forced to create a "New Norm". I work for a county government. We have a janitorial service paid for who does things link take out the trash, mop, clean the restrooms and polish glass doors. Since COVID, we have also been asked to wipe down surfaces, but only our desk ...


6

It's not common, but neither is a pandemic. The company could hire some cleaners, but that also increases the number of people in the building and therefore the risk of infection. You'd only have to wipe the surfaces two times per month, so it's a minor task. The missing gloves are of course supoptimal. Did you ask for them?


1

What you are being asked to do is not common. The common approach to such cleaning is to hire a dedicated cleaning company, who has been properly trained, to do the work. It seems like your company is merely trying to avoid the added cost of hiring a professional cleaning service to give the impression that your workplace is safe.


7

You shouldn't be in the office, and don't need to be "reasonable". That includes not needing to "compromise" by working x days in the office instead of all week, or any other ideas that involve travel or office presence. While individual context and power relationships vary - so you should obviously phrase your part in the discussion ...


5

Where is the new information to change the arrangement you had made? All of the additional info you give was already known before you started. Apparently it wasn't important enough to you to raise your concerns before employment started. Of course, you can make the request, but don't be surprised if it is turned down.


40

It sounds like these first weeks in the boss's office are to bring you up to speed on the job and show the boss you can do it. In that case I would phrase the request to "start remote working as early as possible" rather than as a new request. Ask the boss what you need to achieve / master so they are confident you can work productively while ...


3

It's reasonably unlikely you're going to get a clear answer here. The law is interpreted by the courts, which take into consideration the specifics of a particular case. When we try to determine what a company may or may not do, we look to legal precedent to inform our opinions. This is because companies often do the same. Obviously the pandemic presents a ...


9

My question is can my work enforce this health and safety rule on employees outside of the workplace and working hours? They're not trying to do that. If meeting with other members of staff indoors, then you must follow the office procedures and maintain social distancing. As a clear example, do you think this message is also intended to apply to a ...


62

Snows answer is good. I just want to outline a potential risk. You have only been there 2 weeks, so a lot may hinge on your performance in that time which isn't very long. You were aware of the commute before you started, COVID-19 didn't just spring up by surprise. So, if your employer has any little issues with your performance so far, it's not going to ...


77

Yes, it's entirely reasonable to ask, if you've not done so already. It's up to your boss to give you a compelling reason for you to travel that far and work in their home. As a compromise, you could ask to work from your own home for a couple of days a week and see how that impacts your work performance. If there's no issues, then you can use this a ...


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