New answers tagged

2

One of the causes of the problem, possibly the main cause, if as a pair in the exercise you were falling behind, and you needed to step in to speed it up, she was the reason for you as a pair falling behind. And she doesn't want to admit or accept that; it makes her look bad. Instead of learning, of working on it until she gets better, one of classic ...


6

What should I do? Should I go talk to an hr person? I feel sorry for my mistake and angry for allowing her to talk to me like that (I could not say anything when she went like that, I was dumbstruck. I still am). It's times like this you need to really remember that HR is not your friend. If HR gets involved then this becomes a problem that the ...


1

Is this worth mentioning to my supervisor? It sounds like the situation was not harassment and not in violation of any company policy. It doesn't seem like there'd be any reason to mention it. Is there anything I should do to protect myself? It seems unlikely that there is anything you need to protect yourself from, but it might be a good idea to ...


5

Is this worth mentioning to my supervisor? Nope. Everything they have done so far has been respectful, and thus management does not need to be involved. If they do anything further that makes you uncomfortable then this question would need to be revisited based on what happened. Is there anything I should do to protect myself? There are several things ...


21

Is this worth mentioning to my supervisor? Is there anything I should do to protect myself? No. You yourself stated that you don't work with or report to this person, they are not on your team and that the incident was polite and respectful. This should be reason enough to not mention to your supervisor ( i.e. it was a normal adult interaction ). ...


0

In top of the answers I think the problem is about confidence. your developer is confident of using X and afraid of using any other language he is not so good at. probably a training in the capabilities of your Y language may give him some confidence in using Y


-1

Consider the possibility that your developer (the one who really likes X) is on the autistic spectrum, or at least has autistic traits. The obsessive focus on one thing, talking about it all the time, may indicate that this person has some sort of condition, which makes it difficult for him to approach the matter objectively. The reason why I'm saying this ...


0

Having lived in Germany for much of my adult life, and then in China, I find this question extremely interesting. One bit of scientific knowledge can be turned into an amazingly lucrative industry in the PRC. China has a family-oriented and strongly nationalistic society. Gaining technical know-how overseas can lead to incredible rewards at home. ...


4

No, language X itself is not really the problem. What you've described here are the symptoms of a much deeper problem that will affect all the other systems your team produces as well: the team isn't really working as a team but instead as a bunch of disconnected individuals. Your instinct that you "want [your] team to be autonomous and happy, building them ...


7

I think you're approaching the problem from the wrong perspective. You are turning it in our pet language vs. his pet language problem. Languages are only tools, quite universal one, so their choice is a side issue. The real problem is that you have a total chaos in team. It looks like everyone can do what he want, choosing any tool, even those he's ...


2

One of the benefits I find of belonging to the Project Management Institute is that in situations like this there is a clear code of ethics that can be consulted. In this case there is a mandatory standard that provides a clear and unambiguous response. This is part of the Responsibility standard. 2.3.2 We report unethical or illegal conduct to ...


10

Is X itself the problem? No. X is not the problem... for every value of X This is a management problem. As a new manager, you landed a tough one. You problem is that you have a very enthusiastic programmer who you would like to redirect into a more productive employee. You suspect that if you tell him he can't use X you will have to replace him ...


1

You should make it obvious for the higher-ups and the team that X in its current state is a problem, because apparently there is currently no understanding that this is the case. Tell everyone that the team needs at least two X experts, in case one of them calls in sick. Ask for a training in X for the whole team. Every time the project breaks because of an ...


8

As others have said, this situation should not be allowed to continue. It does indeed sound like the fundamental answer is going to be of the form "No, sorry, you can't use X." And you are well within your rights to say that. Your worst case scenario is this dev gets upset and quits. That would be sad, but is his perogative and your answer should probably ...


2

Building on other answers, I agree that languages/technologies to be used in the project should be positively selected by the team before being used (excepting possibly a trial or test case for feasibility, with no promise or critical-path to be used in the project itself). I worry that that wasn't done, and trying to bring the topic up for discussion with ...


39

Absolutely not! Entire companies have died because they picked the wrong language in which to write their codebase. If the language dies, becomes unpopular, or leads to intractable scalability issues, the code dies too. Can you afford to rewrite it? When you need to completely rewrite a piece of software in a different language, you will be a sitting ...


44

Hard no. Pet languages, or even excessive numbers of languages, getting introduced into a project make it completely unmaintainable in the long term. When the developer leaves, you'll end up with the code in their pet language in whatever status they left it in, and a pile of workarounds in the other components to get things done without having to change ...


70

I'd be very, very concerned about this. If he gets hit by a bus tomorrow, or decides to leave tomorrow, then you currently have: A massive cost, both time and money wise, of finding an expert in X to replace him; A team that doesn't understand any of the code he's written; A team that can't reliably even deploy any of the code he's written; Code that is ...


1

I think you need to have a discussion with the team on this language. Let the developer to present the language first, hear the advantages the language can give as well as what disadvantages language has. Bring up your concerns about stability, compatibility, etc. Take a look on the track record of who developed the language (for example Microsoft is known ...


15

This is one of the few things were I think a manager should put his foot down and not give in. What the developer is doing will hurt the company in the long run. And it doesn't matter what X is -- all that matters is that your company does not have a lot of expertise in X, and it will be hard to attract expertise in X. Your developer is wrong that X is the ...


93

How can I handle the risk to the project presented by X? To address this, I am going to use your own words: it's evolving fast / unstable - on going to document some older code, he found some base functionality had been removed, wouldn't compile in newer versions, so took a couple of days to re-implement it AND the other devs are clearly ...


134

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


1

Are there areas of good practice that you haven't mentioned or are flat out unaware of? It is unusual for anyone to be great at every aspect of their job, especially one requiring such a complex (and recently developed) knowledge base. Additionally, new hires are sometimes selected to cover known weaknesses. It is plausible that your technical lead has ...


4

Do you think you would be better fit for Lead Data Scientist? Because this is what your manager will glean from your approaching him about the current one`s shortcomings. Even if you mention that you are NOT gunning for the promotion


4

This is a VERY VERY tricky situation and you have to be very strategic about how you do this. Before you run to any PM with your complaints you need to back everything up with proof. You need: dates Times Type of incident(problem committing a git branch/adding new git branch Summary of what was said by either party regarding any disagreements you said ...


2

First of all, remember one thing, you are not in charge of reviewing the work (pattern or habit) for the lead - so go ahead raising a flag only if their behavior is a problem and has a direct impact on your work outputs. In case, due to their work habit, you (and others) are facing difficulties, I'd suggest the following steps: Try noting down the ...


0

Please don't overthink this. It's a difference in personal style. You can take a moment or two to explain your personal style: Have a private conversation with this person, where nobody else can overhear. Tell him you are a private person and you wish he would stop the unwanted behavior. "When you said yesterday, 'Why are you in a bad mood?' it felt ...


4

It seems you clearly understand that your Project B uses fake scrum. It seems you competently resisted some fake-scrum nonsense (extra large velocity numbers) in your previous tenure on the project. That is excellent experience, even if it was unpleasant. You also noticed that you had responsibility (prepare code for test, for example) without authority (...


6

DarkCygnus answer is good if you really don't want anyone else to see the bear, but if you want to minimize perceived weirdness from other people you should probably just suck it up. The gift sounds a little bit quirky, but also funny and nice. Stealing it back or even just being embarrassed about it later would likely be seen as a lot weirder than giving ...


-3

Quite obviously he does not know a lot about you, or doesn’t care about your feelings one bit, or he would have known that his actions upset you and would have stopped. What he does is just a cheap parlour trick. The way to stop it is to demonstrate to everyone it doesn’t work. The next time he pretends to know something about you, you straight contradict ...


5

The next time you’re late to a meeting, as an apology you should say “sorry I’m late for the meeting”. That’s it. No presents. Ever.


0

It is nigh impossible to change someone else's behaviour, the only control you have is in how you react to their behaviour. Next time your colleague finishes your sentence or pre-emptively starts a task he knows you need done, speak to him: Tell him that you prefer a certain procedure in how things are done and that he needs to clarify with you before he ...


24

It seems that you have the unexpected interpersonal / workplace problem: the one between your colleague and the other colleagues :) And you are uncomfortable, that they have no problem :) I wish he would either not socialize with coworkers Of course, the first thing that you MUST do is accept things: the social skills of other people are not your concern ...


16

What should I do? If you are not comfortable with him putting the Bear there, I suggest you approach him and tell him about it. Try in his office, or wherever you seem fit, and ask for a quick private talk. Express to him that the gift was intended for him as an apology, and that it is embarrassing for you that it is displayed in front of everybody. Any ...


4

Sharing your exact age is up to you, but I would keep it private. Sharing that you're 22 could seem a bit cavalier early in your tenure. Things you can do while you settle in to the role: 1. Focus on demonstrating your capabilities. If you're smart and do good work, your colleagues will notice and quickly respect your opinion and leadership. 2. Get ...


1

Much as I like the "mind your own business" attitude, I don't think it applies here. If my colleague was paid more than me for no apparent reason, I'd mind my own business. If my colleague was being knowingly dishonest, it would by of my concern. I have the right to work in an atmosphere of trust which is impossible when such people are around. You have ...


3

Should I avoid revealing my age at a new role? At your age, it isn't a big deal to reveal your age if you so choose. However, as you get older, you will find out about this thing called age discrimination. There is no magic number for this, but in my experience it started happening when I was in my early 40's. Employers typically want young workers like ...


14

There's no need to hide it, or to be upfront about it when not asked. If asked, you should be honest, however (since people can find out anyway). If questioned, just state that you started early and worked hard to get where you are now.


2

Take time to chat with your remote colleagues. 1) You probably have access to some kind of chat application, that you can use to build acquaintance with them. I myself had to do it, just ask them about their day or anything possibly interesting for them. This is maybe not ideal but you will know them better, and they will become more friendly. This way you ...


2

Consistency is a weak argument. For a person who doesn't agree with a particular formatting rule, it might feel like there's a problem with micromanagement or with a power-hungry architect. Formatting almost never matters - "it's like colors, some people like it red some other blue". The real benefit of automated formatting rules is that programmers don't ...


6

Email to HR (from you, or your manager, depending on how the politics are working in your company) with one of these: Dear HR person: please can you confirm whether the rule about making up hours spent on language lessons (etc) is still in effect? as I understand from John Smith (new hire in the Q department) that this is no longer being communicated as a ...


-4

Just do what your colleague does So, at my annual review, I've asked my manager if it's possible that I count these hours as "worked" hours and because he was happy with my performance, he was OK with that. Your manager gave you a shield for your ass. If your colleague can get away with what he's doing then so can you.


-4

Since the jerk who is ignoring the rule has told you personally that he knows about the rule but is ignoring it because of some pseudo-legalistic excuse, the "emotionally intelligent" thing to do is simple: spread that message throughout the workgroup, then stand back and enjoy watching the consequences. There is always one guy in a group who likes ...


15

The other answers are perfectly fine and acceptable, but I believe they all fail to take into account OP's feelings of being cheated. It doesn't matter that the other guy is cheating the company, it doesn't matter that OP has to stay 2-4 hours extra to make up the time. What matters is the other guy is cheating OP, knowingly and on purpose. Why should he ...


9

I'm going to go against the majority of answers and say that your co-worker is not committing fraud or even being unethical. You state that the language classes occur during normal working hours at the job location. I assume that the language(s) being taught are for the purpose of making the employees more productive? Given all these factors, I think it ...


10

I was promised that every major issue in project organization was resolved, so now developers do not overwork, have direct communication to the clients. The only choice I have it either to try and confirm that Project B organization was really changed and I will like working on Project B or quit. From your statement, it appears that you have raised your ...


60

Your colleague is wilfully committing fraud. Or whatever the non-monetary equivalent to fraud is. The behaviour is dishonest and therefore fair game to deal with as your wish. Feel free to report his behaviour to HR. Don't bother with your manager as he (rightly or wrongly) clearly doesn't care for the rule and has no particular incentive to enforce it. ...


191

Your problem is that you're not separating two completely different things: The difficulty making up the 2-4 hours that you're spending on learning a foreign language. Your coworker operating under a different set of rules than you. Those two have nothing to do with one another. If you forced your coworker to follow the rules, you're still going to be in ...


1

Maybe the guy is hired for 3/4 of the time? I would ignore the issue and mind my own business. For a few reasons. One of them (experiencing from attending similar course) is that those rules are usually stated in agreement you get when you sign for that course. So that HR e-mail is just a reminder. Saying that you didn't get the memo so you are excerpted ...


-1

Is there anything more intelligent that I can do besides what I did till now, i.e., ignoring this issue and minding my own business? No, there is nothing you should do other than minding your own business. Your colleague cheating the system is his problem, not yours and eventually it will catch up to him. Ratting out your colleague won't solve your ...


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