New answers tagged

1

You may be experienced and highly skilled in the general area, but there's a lot you don't know about your new company, where they keep things, how they like things done, and the office politics. It's easy to make a mistake if you just assume that everything should be done like it was in your previous job. It may take a few months before you know enough to ...


4

Seniority is a big thing in some of the cultures. Seniority can be determined by multiple criteria: years in the field, at the company or physical age. The more complex the system the longer it takes to get used to even a little. A week is a short time in a company that has had multiple mergers and the intertwined systems would require their own subject in a ...


47

It's not uncommon in some workplace cultures and systems, for there to be unofficial rungs on the ladder. In addition, it is not uncommon for existing employees to give directions to new employees. You have been there a single week. You're the new guy. Before you decide to indeed get off on the wrong foot, find out what your expectations are from your ...


-3

It's unclear to me what your job is, and that impacts my answer. For example, if you're a software developer but your primary responsibility is validating documentation, that is a big deal, and you should start looking for a new job (yes, I know it's cliche on Workplace SE to say "look for a new job" at the drop of a hat, but I'm speaking from experience ...


10

Should I indulge my new co-workers? In this scenario, it is definitely time to stop indulging them. The longer you do this the harder it will be to break them of the habit. One thing to consider: Are you certain they are not following your manager's instructions? After you verify that point, simply start saying "I get my tasks from our manager". In ...


0

Provided that there are no ad hominem attacks, the questioning of the value of fundraising staff is fair game. Nobody likes having their usefulness questioned, but it is nothing personal, and responding emotionally is a bad idea. It goes without saying that an effective fundraiser is expected to be bringing in a lot more money than his/her salary costs. To ...


0

This needs to be taken to your common manager; if you have a good relationship with him, something like the following may help: "Hi, [Manager]. Jane is doing very good work, but she still a little nervous about her role and place in the company, and seems to be concerned about her future here. Maybe you could talk to her and plan some development with her.". ...


-6

Every kind of organization was founded with the aim to make profit. This is also true for non-profit and charity organizations which aren't depended on financial benefit but on the applause they get form their customers. If the customer of an organization is satisfied he will reward it. In the special case with the co-workers who have made a small rant ...


13

First by way of reassurance, it is probably worth mentioning that it won't be your colleagues who decide who if anybody is let go from your organization. It will be your boss, who hopefully has a much better idea of your value to the organization. However this does indicate a slight problem with communication which you might do well to address. First I ...


2

I saw a couple warning signals in your question: I have seen her numerous times shaking, unable to eat etc. ahead of what are actually routine, but last-minute meetings. and Her most recent days off she said she was preparing her house for (selling) downsizing and so on. This sounds like pretty clear evidence that Jane is experiencing some serious ...


4

Talk to HR. I would advise against talking to her yourself because you mentioned you're not her manager, just senior to her. It sounds like she's having major anxiety issues and could need help. I have seen her numerous times shaking, unable to eat etc. She might be having panic attacks at work and could need to see a professional. This could even ...


2

I'm going to echo dwizum's suggestion that Jane isn't making up all of this off the top of her head, and it has to be coming from somewhere. Jane probably has some prior experience with being laid off or fired, and she probably sees some similar situations happening in her current environment to her past one(s) where she's had bad experiences. The best ...


8

An important consideration when thinking about Jane's attitude is that she has likely formed her current beliefs based on things that she has observed in her past. Layoffs are traumatizing. Even if you aren't laid off, it can be traumatic to see your peers or friends get laid off. For some people, this sort of trauma creates fear or anxiety. Anyone who has ...


8

This won’t change until either you tell her, or she is laid off. Meet with her and talk to her. Tell her that her continuous moaning gets on everyone’s nerves, that she is wasting time instead of being productive, and that if she doesn’t stop, you will talk to your line manager to get rid of her because if her effect on the team. Then whenever she comes ...


2

This happened at our company. But in our case we were the ones doing it. The remaining 3 people in our team after 15 were laid off. We did this as a coping mechanism, because yeah, morale gets destroyed when 90% of your area is laid off. But we learned to laugh it off. Our boss didn't like it, but she learned to laugh with us when she called us and we would ...


6

Sounds like if management would find out about that then 'Jane' might get her "prophecy" fulfilled for herself b/c she is creating toxic environment by demoralizing the team members. In lot of cases there is no good way to find out if your department and your role is going to be terminated up until you are called to HR. Even if some people on the team are ...


18

There are two different answers. The first is that "Jane" is likely to create a self-fulfilling prophecy by becoming ever more negative that she leaves, or is terminated, when there was absolutely nothing at all wrong with the business. I would tell her this immediately -- share with her whatever concerns, or lack thereof, that you may have. The second is ...


-2

It helps me to concentrate on what I'm doing and retain specific elements of the idea into my memory bank when I think out loud. It helps me to stay focused when so many other "noises" are vying for my attention, such as the conversation happening down the hall, or a co-workers phone ringing. It seems to me that you should find a way to cope with the ...


4

Even if they have strep, it is quite plausible they caught it from someone else: if you have an infectious disease, that means it is spreading in your community. Everyone in your community is likely to get exposed to someone with it in a window of time surrounding when you get sick. So rather than apologize, I'd focus on the warning. If your workspace is ...


59

I decided to go ahead and email him to express that I hope he gets well soon and that I was diagnosed with strep. I did not apologize in the email. My reasons for doing so is as follows: We work together frequently enough that an email with some personal information isn't too unusual Since it's flu season (which strep can be confused for) and we work in ...


13

I worked in a factory where we were almost on top of each other. They say that people get can get sick from the same person at different times. E.g. Amy could come in with it on Monday, give it to you and Joe and Joe could actually get sick before Amy, and then you after Joe so Joe might think he gave it to you when he actually caught it from the person who ...


2

This depends a lot on what is customary in your locale. With the caveat that I am Canadian and this is what is customary in my locale, here is my response: I think you're overthinking this. People give diseases to others at work all the time. It happens. You did your best to let everyone know not to come close to you and so on. The rest is not your ...


23

Yes, your response is appropriate. Most of the time, were this a common cold or the flu, I would say a message like this is not necessary and not to worry about it. However, since this is specifically strep throat, which may not go away without the correct treatment, I think it's worth mentioning. The main point of the message is that you have information ...


191

My question is, is this an appropriate way to express my concern and apologize if I accidentally spread my illness to him? I think you may be worrying about this a bit too much, and if you provide inaccurate information you could cause more harm than good. Unless you are 100% certain you caused this persons illness, there really isn't much to say and an ...


3

Plagiarism refers to lying, not citations In academia, plagiarism does not happen when you copy & paste lots of uncited material in a paper. It happens when (and only when) you sign your name on that paper and misrepresent that this is fully authored by you - as being the sole author(s) is explicitly required by the submission requirements both for ...


6

If you ever want to publish your documentation outside of your organization, then plagiarism can potentially lead to copyright lawsuits. So if there is a chance that this might happen someday, then it is a good idea to mark those sections you didn't write yourself or even better to avoid such copyright violations in the first place by paraphrasing the ...


14

In the workplace, you want the best documentation possible, and it doesn’t matter one bit where the information comes from. You will be held responsible for correct contents, that’s it. If you stole a co-worker’s work, that would be a problem, but apart from that any source is fine. Copyright infringement is a problem if caught, but plagiarism just isn’t. ...


0

Been in that situation before. The co-worker gave an assignment like an order. I was new on the job. I thought it was strange he was being rude but I didn't want to rock the boat. The next thing I know he's telling the manager that I volunteered to do the work. My advice is to ignore the guy's email. It's on him if he fails to get work done that his manager ...


48

Academic style citations in internal company documents are unheard of in any organisation I've ever worked at (startups, government departments, enterprise level companies). Links to other useful documents would be normal, but in my opinion there's nothing to handle here - your colleague is not preparing an academic paper, so there's no expectation that ...


0

I assume that your coworker has no authority to assign work to you without your consent. I'd reply to the email saying that this is the first you've heard about the "assignment" and ask that he give you more notice in the future. Also request that he discuss it with you in advance so that you have the ability to either agree or disagree to the task. Again, ...


3

As FooBar said, I see absolutely no reason to go through so much trouble when you have Red Cross and several other organizations helping solving (or mitigating) many problems that afflict our poor world. You should approach your manager and communicate that, inspired by the recent hurricane, you would like to start a voluntary donation program, where every ...


0

Sounds like a great idea! If there's no-one at your company who looks after this sort of thing (or none that you know of) then the first thing would probably be to speak with your manager regarding it - they might not be the person who can green light or handle this but they may know who can. As for how to approach it I think you can pretty much say what ...


11

"but I’d prefer the professionals take care of that." Then collect money, donate it to the Red Cross (or similar) and let them decide how to use it. Maybe local filters are better, or food, or blankets. You will spent a lot for figuring out how to send a single water delivery, so a lot of your money gets lost without helping anyone. Bigger projects or NGO ...


5

You can answer to your supervisor while CC your co-worker: Hi Supervisor, My workload is Work work work co-worker work co-worker work work Could you send me deadline for them so I could arrange them? Also is there someone I could ask about co-worker work as there are some things I need to get clarified and explained I would ...


1

not yet regular/permanent at work Assuming you want to be permanent, you don't rock the boat too much. You have already emailed him with your concerns. But you should have (still can) emailed the supervisor and ask for confirmation and give any reasons that you wouldn't be able to do the task such as time or location if there are any. If you don't have any ...


2

The problem with this whole thing is you are relying on a notion of courtesy, rather than policy and procedure. Different people will have different understanding about what is courteous. You seem to have been informed quite late that your workload will increase. It is unclear to me what impact that will have on you, and what the expectations are from ...


10

How about you guys? Is it correct to ask for a little courtesy? I feel disrespected/slighted. Seems a bit unprofessional and strange to me that your coworker approached the situation the way they did. The exception would be that somehow you missed the meeting/email where such endorsement would happen, perhaps an email you forgot to read or something. It ...


13

interaction between us still feels awkward That's because it IS awkward, she complained to management about what seems to you to be an innocuous remark with no malicious intent. How can I improve this situation? There's nothing to be improved. Just a lesson to be learnt and an insight into her personality, don't make any remarks on her appearance. ...


1

There was an implicit understanding that we would leave work once they were complete. Notice the we? I think your manager is worried that you don't see yourself as part of his team. Also if there is overtime pay or other payouts for extraordinary work involved, it might become a hassle for your manager. He could lie and say you stayed as long as the others ...


3

How were you compensated for the time? Saying "I took this part, goodbye guys!" sounds unprofessional to me, and feels mostly like a badly run school project. Perhaps talk with your supervisor about making the implicit expectations about the workload more explicit. Did your supervisor see how your colleagues did not work efficiently on the problem?


32

Buy her favourite coffee / tea[1], take it to her at her desk and apologize directly and quickly (ideally today, but no later than tomorrow). Don't take right before lunch or hometime. "Hey listen, I'm really sorry when I said 'hair/face comment'. That was really insensitive of me and I didn't mean to upset you". Resist the urge to add compliments, as they'...


1

One should not approach this situation at all. It's nobody's business but theirs. It is however good to be mindful of your relationship to this person, and consider forging your own relationships with higher management.


2

This can also be a time for that person to highlight their accomplishments to leadership. AKA brown-nosing. By remaining extremely visible to leadership they are able to stay top-of-mind for future promotion opportunities. Of course this is just a guess. The easiest thing to do might be to talk to your coworker and see if they offer up any details when you ...


0

This is your managers problem. Not yours. Go along for the ride and enjoy the drama like a cheap tabloid magazine at a grocery checkout line. This ladies and gentlemen is what I like to call a blank check.


0

Your team stayed to do work for another team. It should not have even been your problem. Last I checked we still have telephones and they could have called the other team whose job it was to do that work and get them to do it. L Regardless it is sad that we still have some antiquated rituals with office jobs. I've run into this scenario before and to keep ...


-1

To be constructive with this person... Suggest she works from home The only reasons for an employee to be in the office are for easier communications with other coworkers, and perhaps for their progress to be monitored by management. Neither is true for her. If she works from home, she can do whatever she wants to create her chosen working environment, ...


6

You can bail on the relationship and call HR if you want, but this is actually great raw material for building a strong team. Working through issues like this is the only route to a high performing team. Usually you have to work to find issues to work through, but you've got them right out in the open. It may start out uncomfortable, but if you can find the ...


1

You have the same rights as this person. From her side it's would be polite to ask you and your co-workers if those changes would be comfortable for all of you.


0

Different employers have different attitudes to relationships in the workplace. Some companies ban them altogether; others accept them but try to manage the risks they create. In academia, the two-body problem means that universities may even support an academic's partner in finding work at the same institution. Some risks to consider: Not all romances ...


1

That person is not your boss, isn't above you in the hierarchy. You don't have to obey it's orders and, in fact, you should make a point of putting her in her place by turning on the lights, talk when needed and unlocking the door.


Top 50 recent answers are included