New answers tagged

1

Your team's job is not to find security problems. Your team's job is to do what they can to reduce the number of existing security problems. That's not quite the same thing - it means you don't have to just find security problems, you also have to provide developers with the means to fix these security problems, and with information they need to prioritize ...


1

As a developer, I can assure you that you are experiencing something the dev team would find similarly annoying, so you can preface any requests you make with that fact. Essentially what you need to do is slow down the flow of incoming requests. We have a designated manager to compile the questions and forward them on periodically, ideally you choose an ...


3

There is nothing unprofessional about a new employee wanting to make themselves useful. If you and your colleagues were in an office together, they'd be spending time with you to help you learn and become productive. So it is perfectly reasonable to do some of that stuff remotely. Ask your manager what you can do to help, and how you can get "up to speed." ...


1

This is an opportunity for both the security and development teams. Silos are all too common and you have a chance to bust some here. I imagine both teams would be very interested in cross-training and collaboration. But before you get that far ... I think it's really important to remember the two very different cultures you have in this situation. In your ...


2

Sounds like your remote work system is what's wrong here. I would suggest having a channel or group that they can ask questions and assigning someone from you team on either a daily or weekly schedule to answer these questions. Given this is a yearly audit I would stick to daily and that persons only responsibility is to answer questions from the devs during ...


3

A lot of the issues discovered reside within the application code and are classical application vulnerabilities such as mentioned in OWASP documentation. Only by fixing the bug within code will the vulnerabilities be remediated. However, developers assigned to stories very frequently (double digits in a single day) IM me or a team member on my team ...


7

Office hours. Designate regular times you can be reached for questions. Or do the reverse, designate regular times when your team turns off communication to the outside world. For sign-offs and other asynchronous communications, use https://asana.com/ or use a wiki. But note that no technology is perfect. Many will still use IM because of its convenience ...


8

Why not a dedicated email or a single support chat? Dedicate one of your people (it seems to be the equivalent of a full time position) to working with the developers to answer those questions and require that all questions come though there. You could go even further and use a ticketing system, which would let previously answered questions be referred to ...


4

First, I will not answer your question (hehe) and suggest that perhaps you could make a group chat on the IM software you use, where these questions can be posted to. That way, either you or any other member can validate or answer any question asked there, and past things that have been answered can be referenced swiftly. This will surely ease the burden ...


-9

You are way out of line, and you need to apologize. There is no part of the United States that has not been "touched" by the viral outbreak. Whether or not a person traveled recently does not automatically make them more "suspect" than anyone else. If they were IN CONTACT with someone who has since tested positive, THEN you should be concerned. Unless ...


12

You did nothing wrong. Your co-worker did something that endangered all the people she worked with (including yourself) and was contrary to company policy. You were completely correct in pointing this out to management, who directed her to take the correct action, which she did. Your co-worker may not know who it was who told her boss. In any case she is ...


12

Talk to your manager. Frankly if I was your manager this behaviour from your co-workers would already have p***ed me off long ago. Lack of teamwork like your colleagues have is a bad attribute for a worker to have. Your colleagues may be causing themselves more harm than they are causing you. So go to your manager. Explain what is happening, what the ...


9

Dust off your CV and start applying for a different job. Yes, the market is bad atm, but you've nothing to loose and everything to gain from applying, so do it anyways. Make sure everything is documented. If you get assigned to some work, make sure you've some papertail. If you can't find some information in the documentation, make sure to document where it ...


8

This is a case where the rule "never assume ill will where forgetfulness explains behavior" is important. They're not refusing to answer, they're forgetting to answer. So remind them. Just ask the question again, maybe with a word or two about why you need them to respond promptly. Everybody is learning how to work without being face to face. It takes ...


4

My first thought is just be patient, especially if you're asking for a complex response. People will often postpone long responses to the beginning or end of the day, or until just before lunch, or until that awkward half hour they have between meetings later. If you bump a thread, try to aim for those times. Also, people don't check chat continually. They ...


13

Reply directly to the question with "could I get an answer to this?" This is Facebook, but Teams and Slack and most other messaging apps have the capability as well. Not many people would be offended by being this direct as it just got missed (as tends to happen when there are as many messages as there are in a group chat). It wasn't ignored deliberately. ...


0

I'm not a particularly thin-skinned person so on a personal level I don't care too much about this It seems you do care, quite a lot in fact, since you are here asking a question about it. It also seems you are vulnerable to the idea of being "thin-skinned", and might even be a little concerned with what your coworkers think of you. Let me tell you there ...


0

It's understandable if it's an emergency production issue, but even for non-production/test environment-related issues, when clients reach out, I get called or emailed to address the concern by one inconsiderate coworker. Ideally you shouldn't be getting called at all. But a precedent has been set whereby people expect to be able to contact you at any time. ...


0

What is the best way to deal with this? There is no best way to deal with this. It seems from you question that Dave is senior and quite well respected by the leadership of the company. In that case they are almost certainly going to go with Dave's decisions rather than yours. This isn't uncommon, you'll find that in any business there is someone that holds ...


1

Sadly, I had the same problem with a teamleader once. Usually, these people are very bad at communication, and often emotionally unequipped to understand all the implications of their communication style. Before making it personal, though, there are plenty of best practices around, including, for example, "how to make proper code reviews" (including which ...


0

It's quite common for teams to start using some sort of tool in an ad-hoc fashion and learn how to use it as they go along. Over time, they figure out how best to use it for their needs. You've been using it for 18 months, so there are probably more positives than negatives. You've already identified some valid points and have ideas. Your next step would be ...


3

I'm not a particularly thin-skinned person so on a personal level I don't care too much about this So don't care about it. It's just his way of communicating in writing. Save your battles for something you do care about.


1

You didn't include a country code. Check your laws. I mean that seriously. In my home country as well as the country I now work in, the law forbids work during holidays. It explicitly says that any work that prevents relaxation during holiday is illegal - that includes not just your job but also side-jobs. It does not include volunteer activitiy and such. ...


6

Try to switch to verbal communication. If this particular coworker can't manage constructive feedback via writing, ask to schedule a call with him where you can discuss the feedback verbally, and then document the outcome later. It could just be this particular coworker doesn't have a way with written word and gets frustrated when he cannot properly convey ...


1

Focus on yourself for now. If anyone else feels like something is wrong then they will approach HR or you manager and deal with it themselves, if you are bothered by it then you should take action by taking to your manager.


34

You've implemented a new and unfamiliar application to the team with no training what so ever. To make matters worse you re-enforced his behavior/improper Teams etiquette by actually responding to the questions that are posted in the group. While the concept of channels and groups may be second nature to you it's obviously not for your co-worker. Perhaps a ...


0

What you should do is subjective to your priorities and your current strategy in life. Some people are fine with being available during vacation, some people find that very stressful. Some people are willing to endure more stress in order to gain career benefits, some people value health and well-being higher. This challenge of how to balance this is ...


5

From my experience, your suggestions will not ever work. If he is "that kind of" Senior I believe he is, he won't take "that green youngling" too seriously. So, what to do? The training and "urge to apply that training" must come from above. It sounds like you are in some kind of SCRUM environment or at least agile. So, to speak in scrum terms, which ...


15

Ask your Manager if you could make a simple guide for him as to what channel to ask for what etc. And ask your Manager to give a gentle reminder to him if your suggestion/reminder is ignored by him.


6

There isn't a 'standard procedure' here. Different companies have different expectations. The one common thing is that it's important to discuss in advance what your boss expects, and how they plan to compensate you for out of hours work. They may expect you to always be reachable, always sober, always have a laptop with you, or always be available to come ...


0

If you work you cannot be on vacation (and notably insurance etc might not cover). I understand that for some places you are a key person, but then again you might have been hit by a bus. You need to discuss with your manager what exactly to expect - they might need you but then you need to be compensated appropriately. For instance, being needed means ...


29

To answer your question: yes, it's common. Other answers stated this already. But no other answer mentions what burnout therapy looks like. A friend of mine answered his phone almost 24/7, on vacation, whenever, wherever. When his colleague, who did the very same, broke down, he had to take over his part, too. Finally he broke down, too. They put him in ...


1

It sounds like they're using this opportunity to make fun of you. Should I contact HR for harassment or something? If they lied to you, they will lie to HR. Or should I just try to ignore my coworkers and go back to happily eating my boxed white rice from Arkansas? Yes, ignore your coworkers. But don't defend yourself by saying that the box is ...


4

I find this whole thing a bit silly and annoying. It is silly, and uninformed, and ignorant. Is there anything I can do about this? Why? What would you do? Should I contact HR for harassment or something? Is this behavior really harassment? Can you prove that you're intentionally being targeted? What kind of harassment is this, exactly? Or ...


7

There are two additional factors that need to be considered: Whether the company is also flexible when you need time off, when you need to come later or leave earlier, or when you have an emergency etc etc. If they are flexible, ok, you should be as well. If they aren't, you have no ethical obligation towards them. Whether it's a rare and short event or it ...


67

There's actually a few different facets of your question. A) Working while on PTO during an emergency. I've worked in jobs where, if you weren't able to handle an emergency situation (even during PTO), you wouldn't have a job there very long. Some places are like that, and you've indicated that you don't have a problem with that - that your problem is the ...


7

It's PTO as in Pretend Time Off. I would have a discussion with your supervisor. Bring up the "bus" factor. What would they (your employer) do if you were unable (for whatever reason) to do your job? Short-term, long-term or permanently. Now, develop a plan (with your supervisor) on how the company would react in unexpected situations. Use a ...


5

While I agree with the responses saying 'Don't answer the phone/email', unfortunately some of us have to live in the real world of underresourced IT departments. I know that if I wasn't prepared to handle a client emergency when on PTO, I wouldn't be at that job very much longer. Firstly, I assume that you have some sort of ticketing system. If not, get one;...


11

Is this scenario common in the industry or should I be drawing boundaries on when I will be available while on PTO with the coworker? Is this scenario common? yes. Should you be drawing boundaries? yes. If you are the only web dev, I think it's fine if they notifying you of production issues during PTO. I also think that if you have the ability (and you ...


9

Do not answer, unless your position is "on call" status then you should not be expected to answer emails or calls outside of work period. Especially if you're using PTO. Edit: Unless it is obviously an immediate emergency which if you do not respond it may impact your employment.


247

It's understandable if it's an emergency production issue It certainly is not understandable. As online joke goes, PTO stands for Prepare The Others, as I am not going to be there. I get called or emailed Don't pick up work-calls on PTO, and don't check your work email. Put an automatic out-of-office on your work email saying that you won't respond ...


1

It seems really evident that you are frustrated in your current job, and with your past jobs these last 5 years. You should definitely consider changing jobs to one that is more like the things you mentioned in your bullet points... in fact, I think you answered yourself in a way here: I can be my own boss (freelance), define my own rate and charge per ...


0

Is there any advice you can give on what else I can do? Wait until the job is actually posted and if it falls in line with your expectations of pay and responsibilities then you can consider applying. Just keep in mind that you would essentially be abandoning your current role and that likely would not sit well with your boss. This could ultimately create ...


4

Don't get fixed on the title. What you need to look at are responsibilities and recognition (including pay). You need to build arguments that you're essentially doing the job the previous person did but better. The first justification is that you have been given the duties and the team associated with the responsibilities but you should also provide more ...


4

Remove him from the team / Get him fired I know this may not be popular but your description is too close to someone I had the misfortune to work with. When people talk about the bad apple that spoils a good team they are talking about this kind of individual. The traits you have presented: Mid/Senior level Unable to work independently Continuous useless ...


1

I would like to expand on dan-klasson's answer. Set aside some time to hold regular catch-up meetings with each member of your team. Those can be 10 minute talks that have feedback flowing both ways. It's important to not single him out, so he does not feel threatened right away. If you want to help him improve, you need to make him feel comfortable with ...


1

Talk to HR about putting him on a Personal Improvement Plan. Your CEO has instructed you to give him more time to get onboard; a Personal Improvement Plan is a formalized version of this process. It's a plan that you draw up along with the employee to get his performance up to a specified standard by a specific date. While they're often used as a pretext ...


6

The best thing you can do, if you value resolving the issue, is addressing it with him directly. Letting a lot of he sais she said go around only hurts the situation more. I think approaching it calmly and in a space where he would not feel too put on the spot or embarrassed to be open would be a good idea. Don't do this in the middle of the office with ...


8

What is the best way to tackle this issue for someone on my position? I would recommend performance reviews. That's a good way to give praise and critique to subordinates. I would just make a list of things that bothers you about his performance and straight-up tell the person what you don't like and give suggestions on how you think he should improve. If ...


1

By helping them less frequently. Other team members, or myself them come to his aid and solve the issue in a matter of minutes sometimes. I would suggest encouraging him to continue to try and find a solution himself, and only assisting once he has begun to block your work. I find that when people are too willing to help a dependency on that help can ...


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