New answers tagged

0

Don't mention it. The interviewers are looking for people who arent just skilled but also the type that would fit in with the team and they would want to hang out with on a daily basis. That way they weed out the arrogant dicks, creeps and those that are plain annoying. I wouldn't even worry about the events as those arent typically that common, so why risk ...


0

I wanted to add one more tidbit for you: Sometimes companies do these activities to help out 'newbies' and have them socialize. A company knows there is stagnation on new hires with little inroads or connections, and perhaps they're in a totally new and foreign place. So this fills a few niches and hopefully makes for a better employee. I ran several of ...


1

It is worse than unwise. You should not prejudge, no matter how sure you are, a situation. And, even if you are 100% certain that you would never consider a company social event, there is no reason to disclose it to the company at an interview. If, during the interview, you determine that the social events are somehow vital to achieving success at the ...


1

I have asked several times to the Team SPOC to send a PO list and evidence of reception, months pass without answer. I called my client and asked him for the information Regardless as to what the "PO list" is, it seems a bit off that you let your colleague go months without answering, and then instead tried to get the information by asking the client to ...


3

Seems you acted the right way. You asked your mutual manager on how to proceed and made a plan with him. You executed this plan. Coworker was not happy and took it out on you. Tell your coworker to take his concerns to your mutual manager. Talk to your manager on what happend in the meeting and ask him how to proceed and how to act the next time you ...


0

You made some rules, that "original" dude goes to the length to comply to the rules. The root of the issue here is the very basis of the endeavor. The "women-only" activity started (the way I understand it) with the feminist movement in mind, implementing the idea that "women are equal to men" (regardless of the exact words). But when a guy just wants to ...


-1

say to your team that "I have some personal work to do"


9

Heavens no, don't tell them that! It will make you seem antisocial. Like others I must challenge your decision not to attend. It seems to be based on a preconceived notion that parties will be a horrible experience. Your basis for that assumption is sound. However it has brought you to wrong conclusions. And I'm a little concerned that you are so ...


2

My question is, how should I bring this up, if at all, during a job interview? Broach the topic when they ask you if you have any questions at the end of the interview. You're right to be asking and thinking deeply about this, it's incredibly important for cultural fit on both sides. Find out their social culture and position on it: Oh, yeah, we arrange ...


4

I'm not big on work socialising either, but I wouldn't bring this up in the interview as there's no way to frame it positively. I will note, from experience working part time and being a student myself - those things make it very easy to get out of social events outside of work hours. For example: If you don't live close to the job, and a social event is ...


0

First, there's a fine line between being critical of oneself and one's work. The latter is very healthy and probably a big reason why he is so competent. Make sure you're not trying to correct something that doesn't need correcting. Second, third person compliments are often much more effective. People can dismiss first person compliments as insincere ...


0

Matthew makes some really good points, but this might not be explicitly related to his work. There may be things going on at home or in his far past that cause him to act this way. If this is true, you might not be able to help him out, unfortunately. However, you might be able to get him to understand this should not be normal behavior for someone as ...


5

Check who gets these apologies. Does the senior report to an overbearing boss or have to deal with clients frequently? There are many reasons to apologize constantly (if only since apologizing is free and therefore worth trading for anything with a value greater than free). I know people who apologize for everything as a relationship management tool. Certain ...


-3

The problem with these events is that everyone thinks they're the only one who secretly wants to leave. The truth is everyone wants to leave, even the ones who appear to be really enjoying it. It's just that no one can say it outloud. This isn't a wild party like in the Die Hard movie or whatever where everyone is drinking, and some dude is coming to steal ...


76

Not only should you not tell the interviewer, you should not be making up your mind at this stage. Firstly don't assume that because you generally don't like to "hang out" with work people you won't want to in this case. Maybe the people at this job will be exactly the kind of people you like to hang out with. You don't know, so don't make decisions in ...


22

A particular issue that bugs my mind is that, I am a person who just doesn't enjoy participating in social events that a lot of companies like to arrange. That would be activities such as attending birthday parties, participating in sports events, dining or things like camping or hiking together with colleagues. My question is, how should I ...


142

My question is, how should I bring this up, if at all, during a job interview? You need not bring this topic up in the interview, as you mentioned you are looking for a software development position. Just to be clear, I am not saying that I strictly do not ever want to hang out with work colleagues, [....] So only if there was to be someone particular ...


6

It depends on your goals. If you are looking for just a job then yes, it is unwise to say so, as it can only harm you (at best it will be viewed as neutral, can't imagine this being positive, ever). It will eventually come out, but by then you are already an employee, and this is not something you will get fired over, but it may harm your promotions, ...


4

One defence against moving deadlines is documentation. This means communicating in writing, via email. If you have a face-to-face conversation with your manager, write down what was said and send him an email. This way all decisions are documented and traceable. When the deadline moves, this is my SOP: Why has the deadline moved? What are we cutting from ...


1

I work as the team lead in the IT Security team of my employer. I frequently have encountered similar, if not identical, circumstances as you describe. We understand why we are doing what we are doing and its importance in protecting the company. However, the average non technical user outside of IT most likely does not. My experience supports this ...


7

Ultimately, you are responsible for your own development, regardless of your situation. When you find yourself as the most experienced person on the team, that doesn't have to mean that learning opportunities are done - instead, it may just mean that your tactics have to change. Here are some things I've tried in the past that worked in different situations: ...


4

I really would like to avoid leaving the company Great, as moving to another company is not guaranteed to solve your problem anyway. is there any other way? Absolutely! What is screaming at me from your post is that if you were to get rode over by a bus tomorrow, the company will be in serious trouble, even if they can find a replacement relatively fast,...


13

You really should try to understand your laws. I mean, he is infringing on my first amendment The First Ammendment says: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the ...


7

Although a handful of states have some protections around political speech in the workplace, Prevailing opinion from employment law experts is that employees don't inherently have the right to express their political views in the workplace as they do in a broader context. To put it another way, your right to free speech doesn't inherently extend into the ...


1

Have you never heard “Never discuss politics or religion in polite company?” Consider the office "polite company." You've probably selected one of the three most likely topics to draw negative attention from someone. Inciting problems in the workplace is essentially never a good plan.


7

Keep in mind that both the office and the monitor are company property, not yours. They're allocated to you for the purpose of doing what you're paid for, not for the purpose of displaying political messages, no matter how correct the message may (or may not) be. Based on that, your grounds for any complaints are rather iffy, and the whole thing is not ...


-1

If you have actual evidence that this co-worker is turning off your PC then you should confront them and ask them to stop. If they do not stop their behavior then you should escalate to your manager and let them deal with it. When confronting your co-worker or your manager don't bring up your screensaver as it is irrelevant to the co-workers alleged ...


19

What is the most optimal way of handling it? Change your screensaver to something more professional and politically-neutral. Suing the company for something like this may be a long shot, and something not to be done lightly in any case (if any at least consult a lawyer first before attempting anything)...


3

This is one reason why the common sense approach to screensavers, and desktop backgrounds, is a professional approach. While you might think your image of Batman or The Spice Girls or Dastardly & Mutley or your partner catching some rays is harmless, there is always someone who can, and will, be offended. Sometimes nothing happens, other times they ...


2

You can simply ask whoever you think is most likely to know about the new person: Ms. A, I noticed we have a new person working in the lab, but they haven’t been introduced around. Could you do it? Or maybe you could send out an email letting everyone know who they are, who they’re working with, etc. Now, all that said: most academic labs and workplaces ...


2

What is the professional way to do it? I think it's fine to send an email to the team as you mentioned (personally, I would use more formal phrasing, and avoid using things like "y'all"). Alternatively, if possible, when everybody is gathered in the lab you could introduce the new member in person to the team as whole (or to the ones present), in case you ...


1

Even if you already expressed yourself verbally, the email serves two purposes. 1) The CC list of people are all notified of what you said, and who else knows that you said it. So it is also an easy way of making sure everyone knows who knows. 2) The written email creates a written document of what you said that can be referred back to at any time by ...


18

You should still respond with your answer. To avoid the "awkwardness", you can add: As we discussed earlier, … or Per our earlier discussion, …


58

In this case, because there are other people in the email conversation, you should still reply-all so everyone is up to speed. Even where it's just a one-on-one, I will often write emails anyway. Something like: Just to put our discussion in writing: This is [What we've agreed / what we're doing / what I need from you by [deadline]] etc. This is ...


26

It depends: What kind of question is it? "hey who wants to go for lunch?" is a different question from "hey could you bop the fizz for Bigclient?" does this conversation need your express consent or does it just need a lack of opposition? If it is the latter you can avoid emails, if the former then a paper trail is nice for everyone involved. Does it ...


100

What to do? Follow the process. There was an email, requiring an email response. Send it. The fact that you met them in person is not really relevant here. There are two reasons why you should still send the email response: If for any reason, the reference of the answers are needed after 6 months down the line (or even after 6 hours), the email will still ...


0

It sounds like he may be a little gun shy providing feedback due to a bad experience in one of his past roles. Perhaps his superior was harsh on him and attacked him for any little mistake he made. He may also have the attitude that if you are his superior on those projects, you should be the one "finalizing" them. He could be resentful if he is the one ...


0

Here's a couple of additional possibilities I thought of (further to the already excellent answers already posted!) This is based on my experience in the past with a specific co-worker, in case none of the existing answers seem to address what you feel your co-worker's motivations may be. Possibilities Your co-worker may be - for whatever reason - anxious ...


7

I am a senior developer in a situation similar to this. In my case, the junior programmer also complains that I will let redundant code through for others, while complaining about stylistic things in their PRs. That doesn't make sense, at first - we're told to avoid redundant code! The junior I'm dealing with, however, applies that principle too much. I'...


5

There are a few different things that might concern you about this. If you take a look at what you're thinking and figure out which of these are problems for you, you'll be able to make a more targeted solution. Possibilities: You're worried about your co-worker's well being. You're worried it'll reflect badly on you that someone else did your work. ...


2

Maybe you can step in with an alternative prior to arriving at the office? The giving of gifts to guests/visitors is very culturally related, so you may not manage to get certain cultures on board. But with some folks you may be able to say something like - "I think you guys are great, but what I really cherish is having the time to catch up with you - I ...


6

It doesn't matter why they ended up working when they weren't supposed to. It isn't any of your business. Their plans could have fallen through, a vacation got cancelled, family changed plans, who knows? It doesn't matter. If its square with their manager it is a done deal. I was supposed to finish month-end activities on 27th December, upon my return, ...


4

Four possibilities: A simple oversight. That person is depressed or has some other issue. She may not like the quality of your work. Fourth possibility. That person is committing fraud. In auditing, one clue, that someone is committing fraud, is that they're not taking their vacation when they're supposed to, and they're not letting others do their work, ...


28

I really don't know how to react to this! As I feel upset as well as have little bit worried about co-worker as well! Don't overthink it, be happy that the work is done. Enjoy the rest of the holidays. Could you please help me how to tackle this co-worker as this is not the first time, he has done this: working over holidays / weekends and take up my ...


4

A possibility that you should consider is that your code reviews are strict because someone genuinely wants you to improve (and apparently doesn't care about the other new team member). That's the good one. A bad possibility is that someone dislikes you and intentionally gives you a hard time. You'll have to figure out which one it is. As long as you think ...


9

On code review we had a new guy as well whom he/she just pass the code review, then when I check the code I was very disappointed on how it passed. The code was full of redundancy code The purpose of code review is to solicit feedback from peers to improve code quality and avoid code smells. If you have ideas around those, you should contribute them to the ...


1

It's not you, it's them. "Native English speakers are the world's worst communicators." Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do except looking for workplace where native speakers work on their communication skills.


-2

I suggest you respond with: humor. One person might: Plan a dramatic moment, like in a movie. where you bring your own stressball, and you're asking your co-worker for coaching on, "okay, how do you do this? should I aim for that point on the wall, or this?" ("After you found that bug so fast the other day, I'm questioning myself whether I should try this!...


1

I am not a native English speaker (but French, and my late parents spoke Russian to me when I was a kid). But as a 60 years old software research engineer and free software developer, I do use English daily: most of the emails I am sending are in English. Most of the presentations I am doing are written in English (using LaTeX Beamer). Most of the papers I ...


3

You have received already quite some answers about how to improve your English, but, as someone in your exact same position, I'm sure that your main immediate problem is not really "how to get better", but how to survive with your current level of English. When I moved to the UK I was mostly able to understand spoken English but I had some issues with ...


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