New answers tagged

0

Some people would say that the employer owes to them some good work conditions. In other words, the company should make sure (through the manager, or any other staff around) that the office is fit for their specific work. Even a plumber coming in a house to repair something broken is due at least the basic respect from the house owner (eg. if the owner has a ...


-1

People coming at a company are in search for a place to work, not in search for colleagues. Most often you can't have both of worlds. I mean you need to earn your living, and in a small company you could have the luck to find good people working on similar positions as you do, or instead some bad luck to find fellows that aren't of best quality as people. ...


11

A face-to-face meeting for this is unusual and unprofessional All companies I've worked in have had 360-degree review systems. I've had to review my colleagues' performance, and they've had to review mine. I've also had to review my managers' performance. This is best practise. But those reviews have always been emailed to the person running the review ...


3

Consider asking your manager whether the handling of appraisal feedback can instead be conducted between your peers (as reviewers) and the manager, as a broker. Feedback about you could be accepted in written form so that your manager doesn't need to spend a lot of extra time gathering notes, and so that your peers could have plenty of time to think about ...


7

Either way, it would lead to each of us stating our concerns, if any, with the perfomance of each other, face to face What helps is a change of perspective: Don't look at it as a meeting where you are telling your friend on what they are doing wrong. What you need to do is have a meeting where you recognize each other potential and give each other advise on ...


8

The true test of friendship is if you can give someone negative feedback without them taking it personally, and if you can receive negative feedback without taking it personally. If you feel like this meeting will ruin your friendship, then you probably aren't really that great of friends. However, you may want to ask your manager to leave HR out of this. ...


27

Sometimes management think that "360 degree" appraisals are a good idea. You really don't want to get HR involved in any meetings. I assume you also don't want to stab all your colleagues in the back. So this is your opportunity to say what is good about your colleagues. Then anything that needs improvement becomes "training opportunities&...


39

Getting feedback from your peers is nothing unusual and your boss only suggested that you meet and even did not request your colleague/friend to submit anything to him. Peer Feedback is also part of the 360-degree_feedback. Asking a friend in a private out-of-work meeting is imho the best option to get honest feedback without any repercussions, so I think ...


0

Based on your name, I'm guessing you're Japanese. Based on some of the comments you've made in other answers, my guess is this coworker is not, and furthermore is probably from the West. This is important, because work culture in Japan is very very different from other countries. As a Westerner with an interest in Japanese culture, I know both sides of ...


6

Normally I'd say to stay out of it. If you're not this person's manager then addressing their behaviour isn't really your responsibility. Trying to 'fix' this will have little upside for you and have a good chance of backfiring. The exception here is when you're with him in a meeting with clients. If it's just the two of you with no manager present, that ...


1

I don't want to lose this new guy as well so I am not sure how to address him about his behavior especially his awkward and unprofessional comments which he thinks is funny. In your comments you state that you are not this person's manager, supervisor, boss, or whatsoever. So, given that, this is really not your problem or something you should be doing: ...


1

First answer the question: is it necessary to demonstrate my skill in X? Generally speaking, unless someone is asking about or requesting some expertise, it gains you nothing to bring it up and can make some people lose respect for you. If you do decide it's necessary to indicate your level of skill, it is enough to say 'I am familiar with X, here's what I ...


2

In formal meetings you simply don't interrupt who's speaking, no matter their position. If you really have to, it's because you have something very important to say and, in my opinion, sharing an experience does not qualify. In meetings you don't try to show competencies, you propose solutions. Competencies are the tools that allow you to find solutions. For ...


2

I would let him speak. Occasionally, I would him questions about his experience, but very to-the-point / technical. Eventually making subtle hints about my experience. So you encountered situation Y? Which solution do you prefer, C or T? I usually chose T because.... I would choose C only if... Possible continuation: Wow! It never occurred to me to try ...


2

Neither boss said anything to you, because they are dead wrong and they both know it, and they don't want to confront how wrong they are. The whole point of taking a break is to get away from the stresses of work. Asking your staff to include a particular lady in their private social coffee breaks, when they obviously don't want to, is asking them to remain ...


1

Go directly at the source and clear things up. Assuming the meeting are improptu you can go see 'The lady' and indicate that the impromptu coffee meetings do not require invitation and are not exclusive. You can state that they are not coordinatedand and whoever can come chat. Once this is cleared up if the complains arise again you can restate this via ...


6

One lady in particular is late most every day, comes and goes as she pleases and doesn’t offer to help when needed so she has lost some respect of ppl in our department. This is the real problem - people don't like her for a work-related reason. Her boss then went to mine to tell him the same. My boss then went to one of my staff, went in her office with ...


Top 50 recent answers are included