New answers tagged

1

Practice, practice, practice. I recommend practicing (to yourself, either in your head, or even better, out loud to a mirror) giving short technical "presentations". There are two forms this can take. The first is to work, generally, on your ability to communicate technical topics. For this, find a short, but interesting, technical paragraph (...


7

This is common whenever you're communicating in a foreign language. It only gets better with practice. Learning phrases by heart and utilising them with minor modifications when you need to, rather than making something up as you go is usually the best way. Then the more you use a language whether it's technical or not, the more fluent you get. Vocabulary on ...


2

Try repeating back to him in the proper corporate language. "I'm leaving, take over" you reply with short form: "I'll cover for you." Or long form: "You're free to step out, I'll do my job when I'm the only one here." It's on the gentle side but it's a really consistent form of correcting someone that you can do unilaterally. If ...


3

Also somethings he tells me to do, I can't possibly believe are right Then find out what is right. In the short term, you can ask your colleague why they think you should do the thing that you're sure is wrong. If their explanation isn't convincing (and they don't outrank you) then say no, you're not going to do it. After that, approach your manager, and ...


9

Next time say "Sure, let me first email our boss to double check that it's OK. We might have to wait a bit before we get their confirmation though.” It could well be your coworker agrees (highly doubt it) or they will accuse you of being uncooperative and/or a snitch (most likely). Tell your coworker that you value your job position more than hurting ...


0

I think I know which country you are from. My advice will be according to that. He is elder than you ( also more experienced) and we need to pay respect to these people. Imagine he thinks the kid from yesterday is giving me mind about how to do things. Even in the meeting you said about the issue in a very kind way and good intention, supposed mistake of him ...


0

Distance yourself from the idea, that everything that happens is someones fault. In reality there is multiple reasons why things happen and more importantly it doesn't really serve anyone debating who's fault something is, if it isn't too dramatic and there is no legal repercussions. My boss messaged me in the morning that I have to write yesterday's report ...


4

Inform your boss as soon as possible It sounds like there is currently an informal closing procedure, which is causing problems. Moving forward, have a close check-list signed by the shift manager Create a point-by-point checklist of everything that needs to be done to close. Have every employee initial tasks they have done, and have one employee, the shift ...


1

I suggest two things. First, these matters should be talked with your coworker first. Reach out to them and kindly tell them about these matters and that you want to know their opinion on how could you both improve that (phrase it like that, instead of "you did X, your fault", as it is more constructive). Work towards an agreement/understanding ...


3

Take things slow and be careful. You don't want to do something that you might later regret. There seems to be a couple of different aspects to your problem that you can deal with separately, rather than trying to solve the whole thing in one swing. The job title It seems from your question that there is a company-recognised procedure with job titles. This ...


-8

Your co-worker is a potential narcissist. The only way to win the game is not to play it. Smile and wave goodbye. You can't beat a narcissist unless you're going to up the narc, and that can be a dangerous and potentially draining experience. They are child-like and will drop to a level that most people don't go below. The narc can't actually compete, and ...


19

I would privately respond with: Kelly, From now on, please refer to me as "Manager, UK Logistics" in our communications with our customers. Do the same with any of our vendors as well. It's my official title and it's what external parties already know me as. Thank you. I would email this to her and see what she says. This way, if she ignores this ...


147

In contrast to Fattie's answer, I think it may be more appropriate to begin with a less aggressive tone, if this is the first occasion on which the matter is being raised. For example, "I've received feedback from our clients that they do not clearly understand our respective levels of responsibility, and I think inconsistent and inappropriate use of ...


6

As a leader based in the US with a lot of Customer Service/Technical Care experience, I think you are reading too much into this. This is fairly standard vernacular/connotations and is meant to give customers reasurrance. Duty manager - Gives customers reassurance that someone in charge is handling their issue. Specialist II - Gives customers confidence that ...


-4

Politely and firmly squash the behavior immediately. The key here is IMMEDIATELY. Each time it happens, do this: Email privately the Culprit, Kelly, and, cc'ing your higher manager. Hi Kelly, you recently wrote to Jim at ClientCo. In the email you are positioning yourself as a senior manager and as my superior. This is obviously completely unacceptable for ...


63

I am from the United States. I have seen this kind of behavior before, thankfully rarely. She is trying to sabotage your role to move herself up the career ladder. Rather than through hard work and skills, she is trying to move ahead through manipulation, and she is deliberately disrespecting you. Is she in the chain of command below you? I think your ...


25

So you've provided two specific examples of emails that she's sent out: I am cc'ing in our Specialist II who can shed further light on this You may contact me and the rest of the Duty Manager team if you need further guidance For #1 I'd probably say something similar. "I am cc'ing in our resident expert on [...] who can shed further light on this&...


2

I would not simply buy one, as this could be a waste of money - depends if she even cares about the book anymore. But definitely tell her you are sorry and that you will buy her a new one - and do so if she doesn't stop you from doing it. So don't ask if she wants a new one, but say you will buy it, and see what she says.


2

Have you thought of code reviews? Code reviews are a standard practice where you only merge your code in after there is a general acceptance of its quality, this usually comes before QA. This will mean that both you will review Johns work and John will review your work, it will usually catch surprises before they are merged and helps the team both gel and ...


2

Log idle time as such This is the most honest option. They've asked you to "fill the tracker with as much as you can", and you have clearly exhausted all possible productive work to fill it with. But for bureaucratic reasons you are still required to write what you are doing in the log. So you write exactly what you are doing: "Waiting for ...


0

For now I suggest just listening to your focal point, it might be that the other developers are just as fast as you but get the same instructions as this is a form of time or risk management to them. However, make sure you have proof of this request (CYA). You've just stated to be pretty new to the assignment, it might just be that they're starting with ...


3

Here's how I'd handle this: If the job is permanently remote: I'd lie and claim it's taking me three times longer than it actually takes me to do everything. At that point, you're essentially getting full-time salary for a part-time job, which will allow you to enjoy a life outside of work, a literal dream for many people (here in the US, at least). They've ...


4

Long term, it's gonna be a cultural challenge to stay there. Short term, it can be interesting, easy money. The main risk for you is to lose your usual rythm. Personally, I'd go with a personal project to keep the rythm, in addition to what I am paid for. I've already been in such a position - just in the office, not remote, for 5 months. We were 3 to be ...


145

Personally, I would just give the book back, plus a bookseller's gift card covering the current price of a new copy of the book, plus any tax & shipping. Of course, the book in question could be out of print, so you'd have to check its availability and its current price on the website of your chosen bookseller. Then, the recipient can decide what to ...


75

Should I just go online and buy a new one or try and explain/apologize and return the book? No need to guess: just apologize and ask: "Hey Alice, I'm really sorry but I spilled coffee on your book. Can I just buy you a new one? " And then Alice will say something like Sure, that will be fine Don't worry about it, I don't mind coffee stains What ...


28

I would just buy them a new copy AND explain the situation as you hand them the new book. You don't want to put them in a situation where they feel compelled to say: "Oh, that's alright, don't worry about it." But where they are actually annoyed and carry a resentment. I would actually be annoyed that someone put me in a position where I would be ...


9

Use your 16 paid weeks of leave to find your next job. Then formally accept the job offer, give your notice at the appropriate time, work hard during the notice period, and leave. Try hard to find a new company that shares your world view, is in your comfort zone, that will let you take your time and not care about quantity, and with peers you can stand. ...


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