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So how should I approach this situation? Find another job where you feel your talents are useful and that you don't have to do "demeaning" tasks. As others have pointed out, your boss is just trying to keep you employed given the pandemic situation. But if you feel the job is beneath you then you should absolutely set your goals higher and find ...


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You need a perspective change. You are a senior developer. That doesn't just mean that you're really good at coding - that also means that you have greater responsibility than a junior developer. You are expected to take the initiative and be a leader. When you are assigned to a project, you should be immediately reaching out to the project lead to find out ...


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Maybe he's not being nice, maybe he's just receiving money from the PPP program or something like it, and can't change the number of employees on his payroll. You can search if your organization is a recipient of PPP here. Either that, or he's receiving money from a budget and needs to use up his full budget, otherwise, he might lose his budget for next year....


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Work on improving your relationship with management. Speak highly of your job in meetings and take ownership of your work. Make suggestions and recommendations to improve the company's products. If all of this is not working for you, probably your boss was right you are earning the maximum for your position already and they are not going to promote you, so ...


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I've had the misfortune to have several narcissists in both my personal and professional life over the years, and by far the best way I've found to deal with them is do not engage them. Don't argue with them, don't highlight what they're doing (even/especially when they're misrepresenting things), don't talk to them except when strictly necessary (and not ...


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This solution depends a lot on how valuable your boss believes testing and correctness to be. If the boss understands the value of testing code and making sure bug-free code goes out, then what you should do is, you should start CC'ing your boss on all communications that go to this coworker when you report a bug. Your boss will be aware of the bugs this ...


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I point out their mistake and whenever my coworker delivers late, he gets applauded for delivering These are at least 2 things you do very wrong. You must not point out their mistake. You must fill in an error report (or whatever you call it) in the official bug reporting tool. And then you notify your project manager about the list of bugs found. At ...


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I am looking through a code and say ok that can be done better That is your first and the most important mistake. If you consider that it is a big problem, just create a ticket bug report / whatever. It would then be analyzed by the responsible people in the project and eventually fixed. If the decision is to not fix it, then just move forward. Colleague ...


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It is possible that he resents your swooping in to reclaim your mantle of senior on “his” project, in which case I’d talk to him about that, and then if that fails the two of you can talk to your manager. But it’s also very possible that after an absence of three years, you don’t understand the project as well as you think; there may be complexities that you ...


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Your initial question was so generic, it might have taken several hours for your coworker to write out a good answer. Instead of asking them such a generic question like that over chat, be more direct about your underlying objective. Tell them you want to eventually become a team lead yourself and you'd like their advice on how you could possibly achieve ...


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Imho the best thing you can do is just play to your strengths, and in particular development-wise NOT try to do things a certain way just because you want to impress the Senior. It's a bad basis for good decisions. If I notice people implement over-complicated stuff that does not fit the problem well - perhaps just to show off - I'm not impressed, on the ...


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Treat him as your mentor. Listen carefully to his perspectives and politely ask questions – specifically including "dumb questions." Show that you are seeking to find the answers yourself, that you are trying to pull your own weight, but that you realize that you need his wisdom and experience. Be humble, though not subservient. Almost everyone, ...


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What has impressed me about junior developers in the past Ask well thought-out questions that you have attempted to answer yourself Remember or write down the answers to the questions; don't ask the same question multiple times Listen to the answer and ask questions if still confused, or if I didn't answer what you asking Don't take abuse, but accept ...


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You might want to read a book or two on making change in the workplace happen. The direct order method from boss can work, but often is suboptimal: People might follow the rules to the letter, but when their spirit is not in it, productivity suffers. Your workflow isnt the standard in the company, but has mixed adoption. Why is that? Are there force working ...


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I wonder what might be a fine method to approach him regarding our workflow? If his resistance is detrimental to the projects that he works on then his manager needs to sit with him and show him how his "resistance" is hurting the project and remind him that he has to follow the established workflow or there will be consequences. If the colleague ...


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You didn't mention if this was a one-time comment from your boss or if they repeatedly make comments about a learning disability, for this answers sake, I will assume it was a one-time comment. Addressing your Boss' Comment Your boss was 100% out of line to insinuate that you may have a learning disability. If you feel comfortable speaking with your boss, ...


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This is a delicate matter and the answer depends on how close you are with Bob. If you are close enough, you just take him aside a morning when he comes in and mention that you have a strong sense of smell, and you have noticed he didn't have a bath this morning and when he doesn't you have a difficult time concentrating on your work (which is why you are ...


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I wouldn't say you're against favoritism, as much as, for whatever reason, your manager appears to dislike you. Of course, from your point of view, it's same difference, but just setting the record straight. More to the point, I don't see what/how you can make things better for yourself, other than entertaining the competing offers you say you're getting. ...


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