90

What are some things I should keep in my mind so I can pull this off smoothly without any incident? Talk with the person who arranged last year's party and (as @ErnestFriedman-Hill points out) anyone who attended that party. Learn what worked well then, and what didn't. And take the "bowling" hint to heart.


46

my boss discussed that we'd stop going after multiple smaller clients and instead go for larger projects. My assumption is that your company is changing their approach in order to grow. As companies grow, they take on more work, and need to hire additional people. I'm thinking this will bring me even less graphic work since we're essentially chasing less ...


38

So you are on your first job. You are a programmer. And you have been asked to organize a party for 35/40 people. I hope it's a joke on part of your new colleagues. If it's serious, then something is wrong with the company. In my culture it's kind of normal to tell a new guy or gal, especially if they seem naive, that "every new employee so far bought tons ...


24

Here's what you do: Figure out how much money you have to spend. What, they gave you a budget already?? Step 1: DONE Find up to three local bowling alleys. Depending on where you live there may not even be that many. Call them and tell them you want to have a party for 40 people. Ask them the following questions 3a. Can they support up to 40 people? ...


20

Don't trust it to chance or broad statistical measures. Figure out the sustainable organization's size and mission. Then do the layoff, and do your best to recruit the rest to stay with you to fulfill the new mission. Attrition after a layoff depends on a lot of things out of a company's control. As you mentioned, if the company is doing badly and the ...


19

You're being set up for failure. It's not intentional, it's a by-product of poor project management and a lack of accountability. It's surprisingly common. Be vocal and visible. It is your responsibility for making sure that the project manager / lead understands what you need, and that you don't have it. When someone tells you they should be ready "maybe ...


13

Firstly, you're not "old". Relevant experience counts for a lot, and you need some age to have amassed experience, which you seem to have. Also, I wouldn't worry if you have Google on your resume, that should get a lot of employers interested in hiring you. IMHO, in the IT world an on-line persona is as valuable as your resume. Consider: establishing some ...


11

Let's start with the easiest ones first. When they send you code that needs rework, don't rework it. Send it back explaining what is wrong and when you expect the code back by. Copy his boss on the email if he says he doesn't have time or misses the deadline. Make sure to note in any reports to your manager that the delay is caused by unacceptable work from ...


11

He has asked you for an estimate "tomorrow" - tell him that it's not possible. His natural response will probably be to try to pressure you into giving an estimate anyway, in which case you need to make it absolutely clear that he is asking you to lie to him. In situations like this, sometimes it can feel that the most diplomatic and professional ...


11

I will speak with my immediate supervisor about this further, but I was curious what a polite or politically correct way to approach this is? You can always politely say that you aren't willing to travel. Something like "I'm sorry my personal situation is such that I feel I can't travel at this time. I'd like to work together to find an alternative." ...


10

The problem with online reviews and services such as Glassdoor is that the large majority of such reviews are written by a very vocal minority. Employees that have been fired, laid off or have an axe to grind routinely turn to such websites to vent their frustrations which makes drawing conclusions from them very difficult. That doesn't mean that you should ...


10

Here's a better question for you: does she have anything else lined up? And just how badly do you need the extra income? If the answers are "no, she does not", and "we really need it" then the answer should be pretty clear. Remember that she can always keep looking for a better job while employed there. If, however, you can afford the luxury of looking for ...


10

I'll add another point on what an "entry-level hire" actually is. An entry level hire, ESPECIALLY a programmer, still thinks work is school, that someone has an answer, and someone will come in and save the day if you are stuck. That is completely untrue. If you're assigned a task, most likely nobody knows what's wrong, only that "it stopped working, ...


10

Get a little app to log your time. Use it for some weeks. You should get a metric for how much development work you really did. From now on, estimate in hours / days and multiply by this overhead. Communicate this to your boss, i.e. "I need 20 hours pure development, so that´s 2 weeks with overhead ..." One thing that is not immediately apparent to non-...


10

I'm also a developer. I suggest for the time being, you just shut your mouth on this poor planning. Send one (1) last email to the project lead to summarize that you don't agree with the proposed schedule, and make sure the message is clear but don't pressure him. BCC to your boss, and make sure you KEEP the email as well as any responses. After that, ...


9

I do this with my boss all the time. I agree this can be constructive, especially in an environment where you are the subject matter expert and your boss possesses some technical ability/literacy, but is not 'on the ground' coding, as it were. To your question: I assume that was an abridged version of a typical conversation between you and your manager, ...


9

I've gone through this in two different companies. Would you be concerned about this announcement if you were a salaried employee working for this company? I don't think I was concerned either time. The first time I felt more offended than anything - if project time is logged, and you are being productive, then what does it matter what else you are doing....


8

The answer is no, hiring is not any faster. Instead, companies work to prevent needing to hire so desperately in the first place. In order to prevent attrition, companies usually work hard to keep their employees happy. Good benefits, flexible rules, pleasant culture, generally treating their employees well, are all important to keeping them happy. A ...


8

Software engineer / test automation engineer here! Every year since 2007, I've changed jobs, and travelled inbetween. Moved countries too. The question does come up every few interviews - most don't even mention them, but eventually: "What about this gap here?". "What were you doing?" My response: "Oh I went off travelling for a few weeks/months" The ...


8

I'm going to amplify @Patricia Shanahan's comment and expand on it a bit: You are not an entry-level hire. In my experience as a developer, "entry-level" is used to refer to someone who is fresh out of school - whether that be high school or undergrad - and is starting their first career-track job. You have significant experience in technology - at least ...


8

You have a few answers that tell you to back off immediately, that it is a joke or you are getting set up to be the "office mom". You have one answer that gives you a very concrete step by step guide on how to actually do it (only slightly tongue-in-cheek). One caveat: if you simply do not want to do such a thing, are uncomfortable with the job itself, are ...


7

You don't need to manage your exit. That is part of your manager's job. You can, and should, make a list of your current tasks and how long you expect them to take. The list should include both what you see as necessary hand-over work, such as writing notes on the current state of each project, and also any new tasks your manager has assigned. If the total ...


7

Power == solution. You are the team leader, right? Whatever you feel comfortable is the best approach, no matter how absurd it sound. For instance, if you believe C is the best language for writing a web page at the client side then that’s it. It’s your responsibility for making a development decision, not your developers. They just do the coding under your ...


7

I don't believe so. Story points reduce the accuracy of estimations because they are by nature ballpark estimates. Its best not to try to get too granular when estimating size, anyway, because most of the time it cant be accurately determined ahead of time. I'm guessing your employer found time-based estimates to be unreliable due to inaccuracy, and are able ...


6

Is it acceptable for me to leave this until Monday to complete even though I'm on bereavement or should I try to submit something before Friday? Most managers would be ok with something being late for reasons of bereavement, especially since you were out of office the entire time you had to work on it (due to them being slow). I suspect if your manager was ...


6

In this case, I don't feel that there's much I can study on my own to make myself more useful. This is because they already have a front end developer who does what I can do, and its unrealistic for me to get into heavy server side stuff in this shorter time frame (though I'll be returning back to school to finish my degree next year). How ...


6

Leadership is about making decisions. If I were in your shoes, I would consider all perspectives and take some time to reflect on a solution. Then pick a plan or develop my own and then inform the team what we're moving forward with. I'm a big believer in just making sure everyone is working in the same direction. So the plan, the plan is what it is. You ...


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