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524

It's easy to forget an interview goes two ways. I suspect their reaction was mostly an ego shock, and had very little to do with how polite your friend was or wasn't. Walking out as soon as he saw the dress code and floor plan would have been rude. Once you've spent enough time to see past initial prejudices, in my opinion it is more rude to further waste ...


268

I suggested to my boss, to prevent this kind of situation, that he could announce the start of the meeting 2 minutes before time so that we still have time to prepare and gather around his desk. He told me very clearly that he does not want to do that. He expects that everyone be ready on time and that it's not his responsibility to remind people ...


260

I don't think there's anything wrong with leaving a marathon-length interview if you realize in the middle that neither party will benefit (personally, it would have to be very bad for me to leave in the middle because I always hope that the situation might turn around and something can be salvaged). HOW you make your exit is probably key and very important ...


244

This is so common among coders as to almost be a cliché, and even termed a "coder's victory". I do it all the time and so do my colleagues. We usually just grin, knowing the feeling. Not only is it not wrong, it keeps the flow of energy going and the enthusiasm up, and generally seen as a positive. Unless this becomes disruptive, don't worry about it. ...


218

What your manager says is nonsense. What he apparently wants is "bums on seats". A nice quote from some top manager at Microsoft: "You can make people stay in the office 80 hours a week. You can't make them work more than 40 hours a week". Working more than 40 hours a week decreases productivity, and not productivity per hour, but productivity per week. ...


217

In this case, yes. Your friend's behaviour as you described it was rude, and you should expect that most interviewers will probably have a similar reaction. What he did right: Waiting for a natural break in the interview "[...] when he was asked to move to another conference room he decided he had enough [...]" What he did wrong: Asking to leave in ...


207

You've witnessed something illegal. By law, you are most likely required to report it to a federal agency, not your supervisor's boss. In other words, having told the boss, you haven't actually done anything to protect yourself legally. In fact, you may be considered complicit. The simplest solution is to forget about getting along with these folks, and ...


199

Be honest about it. Just state that you didn't realize that there was a significant personal cost involved with this event and that you've not budgeted for it. You can bet that other employees will also decline when they learn that they have to pay to attend a company social event, and they won't be happy about the fact.


197

How do I find a job that is as corporate as possible? Ideally it would be a large company that's very depersonalised, with private offices or at least sectioned off. No pressure to try to fit the culture. Work with a headhunter in an agency. Specify exactly what you want, and what you don't want. Expect to wait a while while the headhunter finds you a ...


185

management says employees should pay for such events Sadly your management is clueless. They are the ones who desire increasing engagement of employees. They are the ones who will have something to gain from such increased engagement. Thus any company event must be paid for by the company. I know it really boils down to willingness to participate in ...


181

Here's a Harvard Business Review study on why diverse teams outperform homogeneous teams. Diverse teams are more innovative and focus on facts better than homogeneous teams. However, it's not as simple as throwing a bunch of different people together and hoping that things work out, as this article points out. Now if you're interested in something beyond ...


169

I think a simple, "I am sorry, I have religious restrictions on touching members of the opposite sex, but I am very pleased to meet you." will do for most reasonable people. It will also serve to identify the real bigots right from the start so you know what you are dealing with right up front. I wish I could say you won't run into bigotry. Some other ...


164

I'm going to take a different approach from the consensus here. I think this is a bullet dodged. I don't know about the country / culture you're speaking of, and that carries a lot of weight in these things. But some things are somewhat universal. For example, tech companies are on the more relaxed side with regards to dress code. The fact that these folks ...


162

As an Indian woman working in MNC, I can quite understand your problem. Let's face it. In our country, when a man earns, people think that is because he needs to feed his family, he is ambitious/passionate. But when it is a woman, people assume she simply wants to pass time till she gets married, to earn for her apparels or just because everyone else is ...


161

You can make an impact programming and learning outside of your paid work. There are many open source projects out there that are looking for talented individuals to help out. Find something that resonates with you - something you believe in. Possibly something that you will learn from (a different language, framework or area of programming than in your ...


153

The best motivating factor is trust. Team unity is of ultimate importance in accomplishing your goals. Rule cultures are bred of distrust, and sticks and prods to enforce rules will only further erode trust from your team. Rather than being concerned over exact times and informal cultures, try figuring out what the intrinsic values are. Does 9:30 (or any ...


152

I work in a big IT company (100.000+ employee). Here is what I was told from an HR representative when I was promoted as a manager: We need to hire smart and talented people. Smart and talented people can come from any background, including diverse gender, diverse sexualities, diverse skin color, diverse level of disability, etc... If a division of ...


144

I have been a software engineer for 30+ years, and a woman for longer than that, so I can assure you it really matters. If you want to be treated the same as the men - who are still the majority - then try and look like them; if this means smart jeans and ironed shirt then that's just part of the job. If you want to be taken seriously, then look serious. ...


140

I've done a lot of interviews in the relatively short time (around 7 years) in the industry. One thing I learnt is that if you sense something not quite right, trust your instinct and don't progress further. I learnt it the hard way: when I was close to your level, there was an opportunity to move up. However, the interviewer kept asking me: what will you ...


136

He won't be offended. If he is a reasonable person, he realizes that most people do not follow his religion and thus are not subject to his rules. Now if you're going up to him holding your food in front of his face and making fun of him then yes, he will be offended. Just act like nothing is wrong. People's religious affiliations do not and should not ...


133

My main problem is this: I have no idea how to navigate the corporate world My life as a minor celebrity is over and I want to move on and work as a regular person, but this is proving to be surprisingly difficult. What can I do to remain professional and try to get people to forget my somewhat famous background? You are in an entry level job. ...


131

I think that not participating might cause your reports to wonder: if (boss) is still in business dress, does that mean I should too? Dressing in jeans will definitely make them more comfortable in doing so.


131

I'm not skinny, and I still dislike a lot short-sleeves tee-shirts, and I can easily understand what you feel. I don't like people staring at my arms, and some tattoo from shoulder to elbow. I love my tattoo, they're very nice, but private, I don't want to share them outside of the very close friends and family ring, and never outside. What I did, as a ...


128

The previous answers are very optimistic. However, the truth is the answer to your question depends a lot on: the country you are in, the state of your skin, the industry and your role. Normally, the safest option in terms of your career is for your look to correspond to other women's looks in the industry and country you work in. You can try not to ...


126

As a Muslim currently in the workplace, I can say that I wouldn't be upset in the least; in fact, the only thing that might upset me is knowing that I'm making co-workers uncomfortable to eat in front of me :) I just went to lunch with a few co-workers. Didn't eat anything, but just came for the company. Luckily, nobody felt too guilty or anything—if they ...


126

You can just tell your coworkers what you said here. Of course, most people don't like feeling like as people they don't matter, so there's significant risk associated with this that cannot really be removed, because no matter how you phrase it, people don't like being rejected and ignored socially. In other words, I don't care about "company culture" I ...


125

Professional team-building is more than a few co-workers having a good time together. It is designed with specific goals in mind. The event might encourage people from different departments to mingle and talk socially, before they are expected to work together professionally. If people are left to their own devices, they would mostly talk to people they ...


123

Creating a culture of punctuality may take time and may be something you have to compromise on somewhat. Since you're dealing with intelligent knowledge workers, you'll be more successful if you can get them to buy into the plan. Instead of focusing on the time, focus on the problem created by the scheduling issues. Present the problem as a challenge to ...


121

I reported this to the HR, but nothing has been done so far. They asked me to make a formal statement, which I still don't know how to formulate. Take what you've written here, remove as much emotion from it as you can so that it is just a list of facts and send that. If you have dates for each of the incidents, even better. If there are any of these ...


118

As you describe it, it sounds like this trip is part of your current company culture. You need to take into account that a cultural change will also bring personal change with it. Personnel fluctuation is one of the most significant and also most overlooked costs in the company. There are different opinions on how to estimate those costs, but any way you ...


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