223

Create the documentation you would otherwise make for this sysadmin and leave it at that. If this coworker is deliberately sabotaging the knowledge transfer then let him (and the company who employed him in a senior position) pay the price. It isn't your problem anymore. Do what you agreed to do and prepare the KT docs. Don't do any more than what you are ...


204

The simplest way is just don't answer his calls when you're on leave. If something really important comes up he can email. I don't answer calls from anyone whose number I don't recognise or don't want to talk to.


118

Now, I should not care. I am not their boss and their work does not directly impact mine, so objectively there is no reason for me to be annoyed by this, but the fact that I feel that I make a bigger effort than them in our small company to achieve success does bothers me. Clearly this is about your feelings, and feelings are personal. What helped me ...


113

is it poor office etiquette to display/mention signs of "relative" wealth when I know others are struggling? Given that you are not doing it with the intention to brag or boast (it comes up naturally in a conversation), then it's ok. Sometimes, people can take naive or honest things one says the wrong way, but there is few to nothing you can do to ...


73

What's the most responsible/professional way to deal with this? Explain to your manager what is happening along with the resulting risks. Ask what you should do. Then do it. Meanwhile, document everything you can. Prepare to leave it with your manager on your way out. Your manager can discard that documentation, if he chooses to do so.


62

Nothing easier. Stop presuming that you are a virtuous person Obviously, your entire position here rests on the presumption that you are a good guy, honorable and hard working. From that high horse, you judge everyone else. And you presume that judgment is also virtuous. You don't even think about this; you just take it for granted. Another person ...


54

It's not uncommon in some workplace cultures and systems, for there to be unofficial rungs on the ladder. In addition, it is not uncommon for existing employees to give directions to new employees. You have been there a single week. You're the new guy. Before you decide to indeed get off on the wrong foot, find out what your expectations are from your ...


53

Calling you on the day of your uncle's funeral was egregious, whether he knew of it or not. As such, it can be used to drive the point home. You don’t say if you have already discussed his calling on your off-days or not. In either case, now is the time for a serious conversation. Something like: I don't work on my off-days, so, obviously the status of ...


38

What's the most responsible/professional way to deal with this? Forget about the disgruntled sysadmin. Document the critical accounts and passwords and hand off this information to your boss. Make sure to clearly explain all the things that may go wrong if they decide to simply delete your account. Make sure you provide this information before your last ...


37

The key to maintaining professionalism is keeping the details out of it. I'm looking for a newer car (about 3-4 years old; mine is 11 years old) which some of my peers would perceive as a luxury (I'm not going to ask them anything about cars, but it will be seen when I buy it and arrive in the car park). There is nothing you can do about it, ...


27

I'll play a bit of the devil's advocate here. How to properly let it go how coworkers around me are performing, when they do not affect my job and I do not have a manager position? You're wrong here, three times in a single statement. Stop lying to yourself. They do. They already did affect your job. You think about them, you care about them (even if in ...


21

Having been in this situation many times, the answer is as you implied: it's not your job to care, so, don't. It is your manager's job to assess performance of your colleagues, not yours. Presumably, your manager has some way of measuring performance in a consistent manner (tickets, call times, sales, something relevant to the job you do), and also less ...


21

We have a very chatty environment where it's the norm to share a lot of personal information, so I hear a lot about my peers' children, schools, financial troubles etc. Some of my peers are 'working poor' who have full time jobs but are still struggling financially, in some cases claiming welfare benefits. My background is similar to yours. I've ...


15

If you are based in any of the countries you mentioned in your question the only way you can avoid shaking hands with women is to avoid shaking hands with everyone regardless of gender. Treating people differently based on gender is discrimination and whilst small hand shaking could be perceived this way. I’m not sure how your culture handles trans or any ...


13

First by way of reassurance, it is probably worth mentioning that it won't be your colleagues who decide who if anybody is let go from your organization. It will be your boss, who hopefully has a much better idea of your value to the organization. However this does indicate a slight problem with communication which you might do well to address. First I ...


12

I would go a different approach. Of course you don't want to be bothered in your off time, but not answering the phone or telling him to stop calling you doesn't solve the underlying problem: Your team manager propably has no idea of what you are doing. Of course he could ask, but he is propably busy, maybe overloaded so he doesn't have the time for that ...


12

What's the most responsible/professional way to deal with this? Create a handover document outlining all your role specific tasks with a section for passwords. Apart from that focus on where your career is going, not where it has been. Stay cheerful and ride out your time. What happens is not your problem so long as the documentation has been provided. A ...


11

Should I indulge my new co-workers? In this scenario, it is definitely time to stop indulging them. The longer you do this the harder it will be to break them of the habit. One thing to consider: Are you certain they are not following your manager's instructions? After you verify that point, simply start saying "I get my tasks from our manager". In ...


11

I've been on both sides of that spectrum. Some years ago I broke by back, lost my job, my house, my car, etc. I've slowly built my life back up, but I'm not there yet. For the past 2½ years, I've lived off about $5000 and work-for-rent. It isn't your fault my life sucks. You don't owe me anything. If I got offended or upset by every person who had ...


9

Sometimes doing something will make the situation worse. If your TL has indicated that he has dealt with it, you should trust him, as you appear to do so. You don't know what's going on in the guys head. There could be work pressures, personal life pressures etc. In addition, nobody likes their team being "told off" despite how delicately you may have ...


9

It's certainly possible that you are reading the situation correctly, your colleague is intentionally being highly offensive to you, and you need to stand up for yourself. Based on your question history, though, I would tend to suspect that it's a cultural miscommunication or the result of some other source of stress. Yesterday, you thought you were being ...


9

It can be interesting to look at this from the company's point of view... If you had 2 cars and your wife's got poorer mileage/needed more repairs would you throw it away? Maybe? Maybe not right away? Maybe not at all? Sometimes you keep the sub-optimal one because it's better than the alternatives (Not having one or buying a new one). In some cases I ...


9

There is no easy fix for this situation. Here are a few things you can try Establish clear cut rules and deadlines. e.g. the deadline for bringing in new idea's is say 1 day before presenting to the client. Do no entertain any request after the deadline, even if its better than before. Have an open discussion with the trouble making team member and let him ...


8

Organize regular meetings with this new team member with the express purpose of going through their queries and how they're progressing. The idea is that they should save up their questions for this time so that you deal with them all at once (and hopefully, they'll have solved a few of their questions by themselves before the meeting happens). Set times ...


8

Part of my work is sysadmin and we have shitty practices on purpose This is problematic on its own. If you disappeared today (bus factor) then the company would be in a (sad) state S1. They have two weeks to move from S1 to a better S2 by, more or less magically, make you transfer the information you have. It is not your fault that the documentation is ...


8

I have a few golden rules for the workplace: Do good work. Ask questions when things aren't clear. Make sure you're getting clarification from the right person (usually, your boss). Respect others. I find that when I do these things, problems like favoritism have a way of taking care of themselves. Or, at least, you have a safety net to fall back on when ...


7

There are two reasons why the colleague requests your assistance. The colleague really needs help. This case is simple to understand, the work is only partially, done, and the questions are specific for getting information. Potential solution: ask the colleague to create a list of questions, and interrupt you only XY times per day. At that time, all ...


7

Good answers already, my addition would be showing relative wealth should not be dictated by others. If you have nice things you're not obligated to hide them because others don't. And it's good for your career to be well groomed and look successful. I wear a lot of gold, import silk shirts from Thailand and have my own car. Most people here have none of ...


6

I've been in IT for > 20 years and also spent many years oncall so I understand your pain. A few recommendations: If you're expected to be reachable out of hours then its reasonable to ask for a work phone and to charge OT If not then I'd consider changing my mobile number and if giving it out then only to your manager and only answer calls from them If ...


5

If we take your situation and imagine it took place in the 'workplace' rather than in an academic setting, the solution to this problem is rather simple: The manager meets with the problematic employee, explains how he expects the members of the team to act and behave, provides the examples above where the problematic employee didn't act as he should, and ...


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