197

Then, when I go to source code to know where the problem is, I usually find out that he was who wrote that specific piece of code (thanks to git commit history), but as it is not immediate, I cannot defend myself. Two approaches here. If the policy is "whoever caused the bug fixes it", then you just push back: I've investigated this issue, but it seems ...


192

Your problem is that you're not separating two completely different things: The difficulty making up the 2-4 hours that you're spending on learning a foreign language. Your coworker operating under a different set of rules than you. Those two have nothing to do with one another. If you forced your coworker to follow the rules, you're still going to be in ...


136

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


93

How can I handle the risk to the project presented by X? To address this, I am going to use your own words: it's evolving fast / unstable - on going to document some older code, he found some base functionality had been removed, wouldn't compile in newer versions, so took a couple of days to re-implement it AND the other devs are clearly ...


71

I'd be very, very concerned about this. If he gets hit by a bus tomorrow, or decides to leave tomorrow, then you currently have: A massive cost, both time and money wise, of finding an expert in X to replace him; A team that doesn't understand any of the code he's written; A team that can't reliably even deploy any of the code he's written; Code that is ...


60

Your colleague is wilfully committing fraud. Or whatever the non-monetary equivalent to fraud is. The behaviour is dishonest and therefore fair game to deal with as your wish. Feel free to report his behaviour to HR. Don't bother with your manager as he (rightly or wrongly) clearly doesn't care for the rule and has no particular incentive to enforce it. ...


59

There are too many dysfunctional behaviours here that it will be hard to fix them if the other members of the company don't know how a dev company should work. Your colleague shouldn't be in a position to blame you. As I understand, he's not your superior so he shouldn't be allowed to do so and your superiors should discourage such behaviour. Your project ...


44

Hard no. Pet languages, or even excessive numbers of languages, getting introduced into a project make it completely unmaintainable in the long term. When the developer leaves, you'll end up with the code in their pet language in whatever status they left it in, and a pile of workarounds in the other components to get things done without having to change ...


39

Absolutely not! Entire companies have died because they picked the wrong language in which to write their codebase. If the language dies, becomes unpopular, or leads to intractable scalability issues, the code dies too. Can you afford to rewrite it? When you need to completely rewrite a piece of software in a different language, you will be a sitting ...


38

I don't know enough about the inner workings of your projects to say if he is being unreasonable or not, but I do think there's something you're missing here. The thing is that water cooler conversations are called what they are, because they aren't initiated as much as just happen, to happen. While it is true that sometimes someone wants to initiate them, ...


36

You kicked a decision up the chain of command and got a ruling. Abide by it. You don't work for HR. HR is outside your chain of command. Your manager has already told you how to deal with any difficulty from HR. If you don't trust your manager to take that hit then get the ruling in writing. Then abide by it.


26

Speak up for yourself!! The only reason that your colleague is making you look bad is because you are allowing him to. He is making a claim in front of your manager and rather than challenging his claim you are simply doing nothing. This needs to stop. The next time that he blames you in front of your manager for a bug you need to speak up with something ...


24

It seems that you have the unexpected interpersonal / workplace problem: the one between your colleague and the other colleagues :) And you are uncomfortable, that they have no problem :) I wish he would either not socialize with coworkers Of course, the first thing that you MUST do is accept things: the social skills of other people are not your concern ...


20

Is this worth mentioning to my supervisor? Is there anything I should do to protect myself? No. You yourself stated that you don't work with or report to this person, they are not on your team and that the incident was polite and respectful. This should be reason enough to not mention to your supervisor ( i.e. it was a normal adult interaction ). ...


20

Don't. Just don't. Ever mention google. If you find yourself in a social situation with this person, just say "that's an unusual name! the drummer in one of my favorite bands had the same, did you ever hear of them?". And let the conversation flow naturally from there. Since you're a real fan, you won't come across as a creep, like you would otherwise.


16

What should I do? If you are not comfortable with him putting the Bear there, I suggest you approach him and tell him about it. Try in his office, or wherever you seem fit, and ask for a quick private talk. Express to him that the gift was intended for him as an apology, and that it is embarrassing for you that it is displayed in front of everybody. Any ...


16

There will be many more instances in your work life where peers or people you have no authority over are doing something that goes against company policy or your own ethics. Here is some general advice: If what they are doing does not affect your job and is not causing imminent and serious danger, then let it go. They have managers, and that is the ...


15

The other answers are perfectly fine and acceptable, but I believe they all fail to take into account OP's feelings of being cheated. It doesn't matter that the other guy is cheating the company, it doesn't matter that OP has to stay 2-4 hours extra to make up the time. What matters is the other guy is cheating OP, knowingly and on purpose. Why should he ...


15

This is one of the few things were I think a manager should put his foot down and not give in. What the developer is doing will hurt the company in the long run. And it doesn't matter what X is -- all that matters is that your company does not have a lot of expertise in X, and it will be hard to attract expertise in X. Your developer is wrong that X is the ...


15

What should I do? Should I go talk to an hr person? I feel sorry for my mistake and angry for allowing her to talk to me like that (I could not say anything when she went like that, I was dumbstruck. I still am). It's times like this you need to really remember that HR is not your friend. If HR gets involved then this becomes a problem that the ...


15

During pair programming round, to try to make things go faster(as we are falling behind) when I tried to grab my pair's laptop(as we were working on that machine) my hands did brushed against her top body. An apology is the best start and you need to hope that nothing more comes of it. My reading of this situation, puts you at blame. Your team was behind, ...


14

There's no need to hide it, or to be upfront about it when not asked. If asked, you should be honest, however (since people can find out anyway). If questioned, just state that you started early and worked hard to get where you are now.


14

My problem is that I feel guilty pawning this project onto a colleague. I don't want bad blood between us. Should I confront him an apologize? I don't see any compelling reason for you to have to apologize (for what?) with this coworker. You already delayed an important family event to attend the first time, and managed to postpone it to another date. A ...


13

I usually discover that he wrote that specific piece of code (thanks to git commit history), but as it is not inmediate, I cannot defend myself In a single phrase: Your Source Control system of choice (git/tfs) The ole saying goes the code don't lie. If you are blamed for a change you did not make, you should be able to say "well, let's look at the ...


12

This is a great place to apply the Golden Rule. Seriously, if you walked into the office, saw there was cupcakes because "Cheryl finally managed to get her MBA," would you honestly think anything other than: Ooh! Cupcakes! Congrats, Cheryl! Thanks, Cheryl! As for the fanciness, or elaborateness, or anything like that: Don't Overthink It. You're happy! ...


11

This sounds like a developer that either is insecure of their own abilities or doesn't recognise there is no One True Way to work. There are a few things you can do to deal with it depending on what your objective is. If you just want to be left alone and don't care about dealing with this person, you can say something like "what works for me, works for me" ...


10

I was promised that every major issue in project organization was resolved, so now developers do not overwork, have direct communication to the clients. The only choice I have it either to try and confirm that Project B organization was really changed and I will like working on Project B or quit. From your statement, it appears that you have raised your ...


10

Is X itself the problem? No. X is not the problem... for every value of X This is a management problem. As a new manager, you landed a tough one. You problem is that you have a very enthusiastic programmer who you would like to redirect into a more productive employee. You suspect that if you tell him he can't use X you will have to replace him ...


9

Ask your project leader The problem is that you are finding that your colleague is blaming you for your colleague's bugs. Your project leader is the person hearing that. How do you let your project leader know about this? Schedule a private meeting and ask what to do. You want to know Does this matter? Is who caused a particular bug tracked in some ...


9

I'm going to go against the majority of answers and say that your co-worker is not committing fraud or even being unethical. You state that the language classes occur during normal working hours at the job location. I assume that the language(s) being taught are for the purpose of making the employees more productive? Given all these factors, I think it ...


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