140

I'll usually enumerate my questions if I have more than one, like Can you tell me more about XX? I saw YY and infer ZZ. Is that correct? Am I also right that Peter should take care of task A? This works most of the time. If someone answers my e-mail incompletely, I thank them for their answers so far and kindly ask them 'Could you please provide more ...


32

If the questions are lengthy, it's worth summarising them at the top and giving more detail below. As in citronas's answer I'd enumerate them. I'd also use a subject line that makes it clear there are multiple questions (I often do this with my boss). Example. To: Skim.reader@example.com Subject: 3 questions about widgets Hi Skim, Any chance you could ...


18

As organizations grow, they run into scaling issues, and e-mail communication is one such issue: it grows quadratically with organization size, so that senior people or any manager will routinely handle over a hundred e-mails a day (and that's a low bar). As you may imagine, this means that they will skim e-mails: it's a fact of life, you cannot change it. ...


17

How can I tactfully tell my colleagues outside my team but in our department, that politics is something I don't want to talk about at work? When such a discussion starts, try something like: "Sorry, I don't want to discuss politics at work."


10

The given answers of listing your questions explicitly are good, and if this applies to you should definitely be your first solution. Clear communication benefits everyone. This answer is written as a plan B, because I've worked with people who wouldn't give a full reply even when the answers were listed explicitly, and repeatedly kept on doing so. In such ...


9

There is an 80% chance that just asking them outright is fine. "Hey, I just moved into town and I would be interested in working here. Would you be willing to chat about your experience here. I'm happy to buy lunch or coffee, if you want to. If not, that's perfectly fine too." There is also a small chance that it backfires. It could be perceived as ...


8

Talk to them like an adult If someone says something to you that you feel is rude or demeaning, you tell them you feel attacked or demeaned by the statement. Frankly, this is no different than if they told you your hair style was ugly. When it gets to politics, you don't have to engage at all, and I would recommend that you don't. You don't have to respond ...


8

How can I tactfully tell my colleagues outside my team but in our department, that politics is something I don't want to talk about at work? Eventually, this whole hobby situation will subside. Right now you are still on the "fallout" and subsequent talk that came after that disclosure. This means that soon any reasonable coworker or colleague ...


7

I've found that when running into the personality styles of the people you're describing, it's easier to schedule a short meeting to get your questions answered than getting frustrated over what you're describing. You'll waste a lot of time and stress yourself out trying to pin down responses from certain people via email. Some, even professional staff, ...


7

Not really an answer, as none of us can tell what's really going through the heads of your coworkers, but: People are fallible. There are a number of reasons. There may be: Resentment that you're able to move to greener pastures A perception that you're fleeing problems you've created Annoyance they they'll have to replace you Annoyance that their "...


6

I'd start looking right away as this sounds like a very unprofessional, even toxic workplace environment. In the meantime, it might be wise to follow up with your manager and relate that things have gotten worse, not improved, since your last talk. Be totally clear about what is going on and how it was your understanding that having a professional and ...


6

This answer comes from a western culture perspective. If you are at a social event, and you are sitting by yourself, and somebody comes up to you to start a conversation, you should absolutely stand up, or offer them a seat so they may sit down. It is a bit awkward for you to be speaking with them with your head at their crotch level. If this is a social ...


6

If you are C-level and asking for advice I'm guessing it is a small company. Were it a big company, there should be policies in place that draw the lines on what should or should not be done. In a small company, there is likely an "owner" figure, who will ultimately have the decision on the matter. Personally talk to them. Otherwise, in a big ...


5

You're more than likely right that they just skim your email to get to the point and answer the first question they see, but you're over thinking the solution. There is nothing wrong with numbering your questions to make it obvious that multiple separate answers are given. Another thing you might consider is that your emails are perhaps needlessly wordy. Try ...


5

Bail. This person is showboating and there is apparently no one to humble him back into being a good citizen and team-mate when he does. This "lean" thing you're describing translates into the company being too cheap to hire good management in which to grow teams. This person isn't in his role because he's good. He's in his role because everyone ...


4

When micro-manager interferes ask "Why?" The strange thing is that most of these types are hopeless at detail. An example you gave is 'Attitude problems': OK what attitudes are those precisely? Insist on proper details for generic epithets such as 'Unprofessional'. Document your interactions and requests. Obviously a toxic environment. Get ...


4

Talk to your boss about accommodation for your temporary disability. You didn't specify your location, but most first world/developed countries have laws prohibiting discrimination against disabled employees and mandating that employers make reasonable accommodations to allow them to perform their work. These disabilities can be temporary or permanent, and ...


3

In my experience, this is a behavioral pattern. In other words, it will be the same colleague who consistently doesn't answer your questions, ignores requests for meetings, etc. This is a common problem, which makes it a systematic problem that calls for a systematic solution. One very effective solution is Scrum. Originally intended for software development,...


3

My experience is that a project manager (PM) should be a project manager, not a programmer / engineer... If the PM is also an administrative manager, prepare the CV. You have nobody to complain to. If he does not have administrative responsibilities, go to your manager and ask him for advice, how to handle the PM messing up your code. Based on the decision ...


2

Visiblity when someone else does the presentation Who does the presentation should be irrelevant. The presentation must include the information "who did what". As you are something like a team lead, I suppose you could introduce that culture yourself. Make it a process that in every presentation there must be acknowledgement of authorship. In the ...


2

I would move to their height. So generally, stand up. If they're in a wheelchair, stay in your chair. As long as you're showing respect, you'll be OK.


1

You're overthinking this too much. If you're ("one is") a junior with no experience, the general expectation is usually quite low. Just make sure it takes up less of their time managing/helping you than it would would take to do [assigned task]. And I have to say, your whole post is quite strange. Maybe you unconsciously act that way IRL with your ...


1

Should I stick around? Anyone that gives you a definitive answer on if you should stay or go, really has no idea what they are talking about. You need to weigh the negative factors against the positive factors, and potential of both factors in other jobs. I am starting to get anxious going to work. Mental health is important, but so is being able to ...


1

I've been fortunate during my working career to be educated by many great communicators (and email writers). The first question you should be asking yourself is if email is the appropriate mechanism for multiple questions requiring multiple answers. If the lack of responses are an issue with multiple colleagues then the problem may, indeed, be the way you ...


1

Depending on your situation, working from home may give you more control over your environment. It would also make it easier to take breaks, deal with other side effects etc.


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