68

How should I respond? Should I lie and say no it's not a drill, or should I say yes it is and risk their staying put or complaining that it's inconvenient? Tell the truth. Tell them that Yes, it is a drill, but that they are required to evacuate promptly. If there is a protocol for handling folks who decide not to evacuate, follow that for those who deserve ...


54

It may or may not be OK based on their employment contract and the details of how the hardware is procured, but in any case it is not any of your business. In general, when hardware and software completely provided to a direct employee, there's something in an employee handbook or policy saying not to use it for other purposes. This is not always the case ...


41

Question: Is this a drill? Answer: Treat it as a real alarm. You shouldn't lie, but also you want them to do the real thing. And you also don't want them to ask the question. You need people to get used to the idea that it doesn't matter if its a drill, they have to do the correct evacuation procedure anyway. You don't want people saying "If it's not a ...


39

Refusing to talk is not normally a form of harassment Harassment requires you to engage - what you are doing is the opposite. There are some grey areas you need to watch out for. Your behaviour might be considered bullying in cases where Co-worker B needs to discuss something work related. In this case you'll be able to get away with avoiding small talk but ...


35

You just answer "yes" People know drills will happen and I don't know anyone that won't comply with the evacuation. However, when I'm talking with a client, they will be far more understanding if I say "I'll be back in five minutes, I have a fire drill" or if there's a real fire than when I would just be unavailable out of the blue. Sure, ...


26

I want to add something that is missing in the other answers. Another important reason why we do drills is to make everyone think a real emergency is just a drill, too. That will sound stupid and counterproductive at first, but it has a very important consequence: People will not panic. They will follow (what seems to be) a regular, boring procedure. Without ...


23

I would say this entirely depends on company policy. At a previous company I worked at, this would have been considered a breach of my contract. I was actually contractually obligated to give any work done using work resources over to my employer. Where I currently work, however, I was informed that my work laptop is to be used as a personal computer if I so ...


15

First of all, it is better not to talk with your boss about this. It is not your business. You might want to talk with your co-worker about it that using the company's equipment for a side job feels wrong to you. If talking to your co-worker is a good idea or not probably depends on your relationship. Others already pointed out that it all comes back to how ...


15

Coworker B is not friendly to me after, so I decide it is best to not talk to her. That's fine, workplace is not primarily meant for making friends. If she's not talking to you, you also don't need to force yourself. However, keep in mind, do not let this situation override professionalism. If Coworker B needs to talk / discuss with you at any point about ...


14

In my eyes you did something good: you referred your colleague friend to a side job that could benefit them and give them some extra income in these hard times. It is up to your colleague now to ensure that the job is not in conflict with their contract, non-compete, etc. The only thing I wouldn't have done is message them via Slack. I assume that Slack is ...


13

The issue is that you don't know what their reason for contacting you is - they might need something from you that allows them to carry on with their tasks. I get pings like this from time to time in Teams. Someone will raise a "Hi there" just to see if I'm around. I assume that if they're pinging me, then they feel its important enough to get my ...


8

How should I respond? Respond with "Please follow our evacuation procedure immediately!" Then deal with those who choose to remain after the drill is over. It's up to management whether to discipline these people, or to provide emergency evacuation training, or whatever. The point is, that you should allow the drill to proceed, instruct everyone ...


8

What is such a phenomenon in a company? How can I deal with that? People evading responsibility or action is common enough in many places. You deal with it by cheerful persistence, just keep asking until you get an answer or decide that you don't need a field which you have no idea about anyway like your colleague. If you feel you must know the fields ...


7

If you want to know whether you can do this or not, you can always ask. There certainly do exist companies that permit this. There is a spectrum of policies: we own everything you do no matter where or when you do it and what equipment you use; no moonlighting or freelancing it's ok as long as it's on your own time, in your own premises, and with your own ...


6

I am a U.S. Navy Veteran and a previously qualified fire fighter (because all sailors are, I'm not special). I also have several years of military and industrial safety training, and I've been a trainer and a drill observer. The question itself ("Is this a drill?") may have exposed a culture problem that needs to be addressed. In a real fire, in a ...


5

You should develop your ability to set boundaries. You describe a lot of problems, all of which can be solved with a simple "sorry, I'm busy" or "sorry, I won't be able to help you". Incompetent people who will try to make their tasks yours are omnipresent. Similarly, people going about their lives and not noticing the listeners aren't ...


5

My preferred answer to this question as a fire warden was always: "I do not know. Please follow the evacuation procedures." Because in essense: I did not know. Yes, some times I was notified that a fire drill shall happen. But did I know what I assumed to be a fire drill was really a fire drill? No. If I assumed it was just a drill while ...


5

In addition to the main answer (which matches my intuition and experience that saying yes without lifting the urgency is the most productive), please keep in mind: Do not lie! Being clear is likely best, deflecting the question is a possible alternative, but telling a lie is not a suitable alternative. If you tell people it is a lie, they will hold you ...


4

Our back-end developer is busy working on an unrelated tech debt issue, but the lead formerly worked on the back-end and knows the code base much better than I do. He doesn't seem to be working on implementing any part of this project at all and I think he could be pulling more weight. That's kind of the situation you want to be in! Have "some" ...


4

The purpose of a drill is for everybody to rehearse the relevant procedures and to be thus somewhat prepared in the event of a real emergency, rather than startled by it. It will prepare them to think about activity they need to conclude which could itself be dangerous if suddenly abandoned (including that which may create a real danger during a drill), to ...


3

First, I would note that you don't need to know if it really is a drill or not. The admin team can perfectly prepare not knowing the exact time it will happen. That could be chosen exclusively by the person in charge to launch it. Of course, you know that it is likely a drill. Most of the employees know that as well, even if actively told it is not. ...


2

I have to send to public channel, no personal message. This is often set policy. So it's possible that your earlier communications in private were them being friendly but they were either told to stop or got tired of you asking questions that they won't be recognised for answering. Have a talk with your manager about policy and what is the correct strategy/...


2

I come to the same conclusion as others, you should tell them it is a drill. However, I think another argument may be useful. Consider what you can tell the person: Yes - They now know there is no fire No - You just lied to them I can't tell you - A rude way of saying "yes." If there was a fire, you would say "no it is not a drill" ...


2

I had a similar problem. I took my coworker to the side and told him that his behavior is NOT acceptable. I told him that I don't like him, and I will never like him. I said had 0 things in common but at work we have to be loyal to each other and use politics that fit us both so we can co-exist in the same company. His face changed like he got choked up and ...


2

Imagine a real emergency happens at the same time. Do you want an injured/hurt person to be moved in a hurry which might worsen their injuries? Do you want rescue teams to arrive, and people cannot tell them which of the two emergencies is real and which is not? Even worse, a drill that seems real might cause an emergency: In a real fire, people will not ...


2

Instead of talking to him, you can point him to the answers on this site. For £999 I can get a laptop that is better than my work computer. I can use that for all side jobs that I might have, but also generally for having a laptop of my own, which most people have. That's the expense that I would have. Ok, add a backup drive, a large monitor if you want, it'...


2

This kind of thing happens a lot. It's not necessarily the case that the people you asked are being evasive or incompetent. They might not know, or might not remember. After all, no one can keep track of every little detail in their minds and be ready for on-the-fly questions. At this point you have to think of this task as a kind of "investigative"...


2

How can I deal with that? If the database schema is version controlled, see when that column was introduced and what other code/queries were introduced at the same time. Absent a good version control system, take a look at the other queries, stored procedures, views, unit tests, etc. After all, even if you find the original author of that column, it's ...


1

I think you're approaching the question too narrowly. The first thing to note is that companies like Coke do not merely conceal their recipes. The law also grants them rights to penalise anyone disclosing or making use of their "trade secrets". They also have marketing budgets that are capable of creating hype around such secrets, or indeed ...


1

In a lot of cases the value of a company/individual is not dependent on a super-secret thing that has to be guarded at all costs. Regarding the examples you mention, I doubt that the real secret behind their succes is a super-special-secret ingredient in their hamburgers, cola or sauces. The recipes of their products being in a highly guarded safe is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible