147

In contrast to Fattie's answer, I think it may be more appropriate to begin with a less aggressive tone, if this is the first occasion on which the matter is being raised. For example, "I've received feedback from our clients that they do not clearly understand our respective levels of responsibility, and I think inconsistent and inappropriate use of ...


145

Personally, I would just give the book back, plus a bookseller's gift card covering the current price of a new copy of the book, plus any tax & shipping. Of course, the book in question could be out of print, so you'd have to check its availability and its current price on the website of your chosen bookseller. Then, the recipient can decide what to ...


75

Should I just go online and buy a new one or try and explain/apologize and return the book? No need to guess: just apologize and ask: "Hey Alice, I'm really sorry but I spilled coffee on your book. Can I just buy you a new one? " And then Alice will say something like Sure, that will be fine Don't worry about it, I don't mind coffee stains What ...


63

I am from the United States. I have seen this kind of behavior before, thankfully rarely. She is trying to sabotage your role to move herself up the career ladder. Rather than through hard work and skills, she is trying to move ahead through manipulation, and she is deliberately disrespecting you. Is she in the chain of command below you? I think your ...


28

I would just buy them a new copy AND explain the situation as you hand them the new book. You don't want to put them in a situation where they feel compelled to say: "Oh, that's alright, don't worry about it." But where they are actually annoyed and carry a resentment. I would actually be annoyed that someone put me in a position where I would be ...


25

So you've provided two specific examples of emails that she's sent out: I am cc'ing in our Specialist II who can shed further light on this You may contact me and the rest of the Duty Manager team if you need further guidance For #1 I'd probably say something similar. "I am cc'ing in our resident expert on [...] who can shed further light on this&...


22

Work this out with your trainer and keep management out of it This answer is based upon my limited experience in retail and listening to my wife's much more comprehensive experience. Your question doesn't specify your location, but I'm writing this with the assumption of the USA. Retail work in this country can be a bit awful. The pay is pretty abysmal and ...


19

I would privately respond with: Kelly, From now on, please refer to me as "Manager, UK Logistics" in our communications with our customers. Do the same with any of our vendors as well. It's my official title and it's what external parties already know me as. Thank you. I would email this to her and see what she says. This way, if she ignores this ...


10

I don't live in Germany, but I'm familiar with the language, and my native language has a similar concept. When you switched from "Sie" to "du", it meant that your relationship reached a certain level of confidence. It is a mark that the senior considers the junior at least a little bit more than just another employee in the same company, ...


10

Yep. Even if you didn't say something explicitly sexual, good luck decoupling the sexual aspect from what you were going on about for a full minute. It also doesn't really matter that you weren't doing it for sexual gain yourself. For example, sexually degrading commentary (eg: disparaging comments about... size) can also pass as sexual harrassment. You say ...


9

Use your 16 paid weeks of leave to find your next job. Then formally accept the job offer, give your notice at the appropriate time, work hard during the notice period, and leave. Try hard to find a new company that shares your world view, is in your comfort zone, that will let you take your time and not care about quantity, and with peers you can stand. ...


9

Next time say "Sure, let me first email our boss to double check that it's OK. We might have to wait a bit before we get their confirmation though.” It could well be your coworker agrees (highly doubt it) or they will accuse you of being uncooperative and/or a snitch (most likely). Tell your coworker that you value your job position more than hurting ...


7

You embarrassed the guy in front of your co-workers. That's all that happened here. He explained why he was embarrassed, you apologised (sort of), so that's an end to this situation. To be safe, just don't engage in or encourage this kind of sexualised joking in the office - it's kind of old-fashioned these days.


7

After reading this, I think the best advice I can give you is to learn to be more tolerant of your coworkers. If this is the worst coworker experience you have, you are extremely lucky. Basically, as I read it, this person asked you to help out and complained made a couple of comments that annoyed you. People can be annoying, especially at work. It's not ...


7

Should I do anything about coworker who clocks in early and does nothing? No, you should not do anything. This is not your problem it is theirs and your manager's. If they want to risk getting fired by attempting to game the system, that is solely on them. If the fact that he is leaving to do errands or whatever is affecting your ability to do your work ...


7

This is common whenever you're communicating in a foreign language. It only gets better with practice. Learning phrases by heart and utilising them with minor modifications when you need to, rather than making something up as you go is usually the best way. Then the more you use a language whether it's technical or not, the more fluent you get. Vocabulary on ...


6

As a leader based in the US with a lot of Customer Service/Technical Care experience, I think you are reading too much into this. This is fairly standard vernacular/connotations and is meant to give customers reasurrance. Duty manager - Gives customers reassurance that someone in charge is handling their issue. Specialist II - Gives customers confidence that ...


6

can the previously more junior colleague insist on the use of 'Sie' to reset the relationship? You can but unless there was some sort of incident that would be perceived as very rude or offensive. You overstating the "seniority" aspect. German formality in the workplace is a lot less than it was 20 years ago and "Du" is quite common ...


6

This absolutely could count as a harassment - and yes it could be considered sexual harassment. I was just joking That you intended it as a "joke" is irrelevent. I am sorry I didn't mean anything bad, this is a flattering thing actually As the old adage goes "When you're in a hole, you should stop digging.", your comments made him ...


5

Your idea makes sense but you're right in that some people may take it the wrong way. One way to avoid ruffling feathers is to model the desired behaviour. Whenever someone asks you a question or makes a comment you respond along the lines of If I understand correctly, the situation is A, our desired outcomes are B and C, but the question is how do we take ...


4

Long term, it's gonna be a cultural challenge to stay there. Short term, it can be interesting, easy money. The main risk for you is to lose your usual rythm. Personally, I'd go with a personal project to keep the rythm, in addition to what I am paid for. I've already been in such a position - just in the office, not remote, for 5 months. We were 3 to be ...


4

I know exactly what your concern is. I have previously worked at a company where people were very sensitive, and one of my managers had to have a talk with me that I needed to be less condescending (a trainee had complained). You are right that it depends on culture. When asking for a response, I would try to ask, "Can you show me what you have ...


4

Inform your boss as soon as possible It sounds like there is currently an informal closing procedure, which is causing problems. Moving forward, have a close check-list signed by the shift manager Create a point-by-point checklist of everything that needs to be done to close. Have every employee initial tasks they have done, and have one employee, the shift ...


3

You cannot That is why new software development methodologies like Agile were created so that you have a shorter cycle of review, instead of waiting after months and finding out everything is wrong. During the initial meeting, take your employee's word for it, but make every opportunity to let them know that clarification questions are encouraged (and make ...


3

In a word, yes. You were in a group that was having fun at the expense of a coworker, and then you escalated it. You may have thought of it as just joking, but this is how rumors start. Not only does this create a hostile work environment for the coworker that got upset, but also for the woman you were referring to. Once the rumor mill gets going, any ...


3

I wouldn't go to the manager with what you have said so far. Here's a few tips I would offer. With all your conversations with him, be polite. Don't display an attitude, even if you think he "deserves" it. Act like a professional even if he doesn't. I'm not perfect in this but it's a goal of mine. For your storage room example, I think you ...


3

Here's how I'd handle this: If the job is permanently remote: I'd lie and claim it's taking me three times longer than it actually takes me to do everything. At that point, you're essentially getting full-time salary for a part-time job, which will allow you to enjoy a life outside of work, a literal dream for many people (here in the US, at least). They've ...


3

Take things slow and be careful. You don't want to do something that you might later regret. There seems to be a couple of different aspects to your problem that you can deal with separately, rather than trying to solve the whole thing in one swing. The job title It seems from your question that there is a company-recognised procedure with job titles. This ...


3

Also somethings he tells me to do, I can't possibly believe are right Then find out what is right. In the short term, you can ask your colleague why they think you should do the thing that you're sure is wrong. If their explanation isn't convincing (and they don't outrank you) then say no, you're not going to do it. After that, approach your manager, and ...


2

Log idle time as such This is the most honest option. They've asked you to "fill the tracker with as much as you can", and you have clearly exhausted all possible productive work to fill it with. But for bureaucratic reasons you are still required to write what you are doing in the log. So you write exactly what you are doing: "Waiting for ...


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