164

Your manager appears to want you to set the priorities yourself. If no one will tell you what the priorities and boundaries are, write up a document laying out those priorities yourself. Be sure to include estimates of time and effort you will spend per week in each area. Then, run it by your boss. If he doesn't like the priorities you've picked, ...


137

I would escalate to your manager, They will know who to talk to and will know how important this task is. Some people suggest that she might have it out for you, which could be true, but it's not very relevant to this case, as no matter how she feels about you, she doesn't respect your time or the issue that you are asking her to help you with. At this ...


61

In corporate environment no one believes in verbal communication, and probably the receptionist knows that. Try to bring things in written communication, like an email and mention that i have been chasing the card for weeks now, you dont have to go in too much detail but just something that makes her acknowledge that. Without an email it would be very hard ...


54

Or if you are an employee: what have employers done that has worked to keep yourself motivated and enthusiastic besides the obvious of salary? For example, do you: give out extra $ for certain achieved goals (and if, how do you define goals and check them?) do you provide days/hours when they can do "their own thing" and perhaps showcase ...


45

Agency People are happy when they feel they have control over their environment and absolutely miserable when they don't, regardless of how objectively good or bad the environment is. Take for example Chinese Water Torture. Having a drop of water fall on your forehead isn't painful, it's barely even annoying. But when it happens to you over and over and ...


24

She yells profanity at people, accuses them of slacking constantly, has been known to throw things at them, calls our children "vermin", etc. Buy a copy of Cracking the Coding Interview and prioritize learning so you can jump to remote work for the duration of your wife's degree. You have been given a respite. Don't waste it. You will need to do this anyway ...


23

One option that I have used in the past is proposing a priority list based on the resources (including time) that are available to me and informing my manager as such. Giving a deadline for feedback requires that either your manager adjusts your priorities or accepts the priorities (either by not responding by the deadline or explicitly accepting the ...


16

Per your comment: I talked to my manager about it before, and he just told me to just wait till the next week like the receptionist said. I believe the only thing you can do is give this person enough time to get their sh!t together, schedule your photoshoot, and commit to it. Your boss is aware you are waiting and the receptionist is aware you need a ...


16

Pay, bonuses, working conditions, all those things are important. Here's what has worked for me, both as a supervisor and employee. Gratitude from managers: Say "thanks" to everybody on your team at least once a week. And really mean it. As a manager for the company when you say "thanks" you're speaking for the company. Employees will get that. Push ...


11

There's two parts to this question. First part: "I am afraid of dealing with people smarter and more skilled than me!" Uh, no. Terrible way of looking at it. If you're a manager, your goal should be to hire as smart, as competent, and industrious of people as you can. If you don't do that? Oh, sure, you'll be smarter than your underlings... but your ...


11

Since none of the other answer's have mentioned it, I'm going to suggest thinking about where your employees are in Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. It's typically depicted as a pyramid. A good salary typically covers the bottom level (food, shelter, etc) and some of the second (safety). To retain workers longer, fulfilling your worker's needs from the bottom up ...


10

[Bob] told me that my manager doesn't like me very much, but he beat around the bush when I asked why and said I shouldn't be knowing that. I know he's your friend, but Bob (that's what I'll call this "other higher up") is being a bit of an arse. In all seriousness, this is a really crappy situation to put you in. If he wasn't comfortable telling you ...


9

People forget stuff and things are abandoned My benefit plan login took extra time as the enrolment forms got lost by the insurance company. I got an offer letter in my email with no other context elevating me to permanent employee. A friend of mine worked at a company where they hired a job 4 times because they kept on forgetting that a candidate had ...


9

My manager doesn’t know what I should be prioritizing as it was his predecessor who made all the promises to various people. He just said “realize you will piss people off and know you won’t get fired.” What would you do in this situation? I’m mostly trying to figure out how I should prioritize my work/meetings attendance. You were already told ...


9

Ironically enough, your biggest risk may be that new developer. Great skill in manipulating people, combined with the absence of scruples to use those skills... that is to my (non-professional!) knowledge a telltale sign of a psychopath. You assume that he is doing this just to make his and your team's life better. And you assume that he will not use his ...


9

You tell him what he needs to be working on and was hired for and you discipline him if he doesn't. The danger is he leaves, but it's not a huge loss since he isn't doing the work anyway. At the end of the day this guy seems to be unable to do what he was hired to so is making busy on stuff he can do. Even then a year to redesign sites? Seems a long time ...


7

Going to your own manager (not the receptionist's manager) is the right way to handle this. If the receptionist is not fulfilling her responsibilities, it's not your job to get her to do so. Your manager may or may not speak to the receptionist's manager. You said in a comment that you've already spoken to your manager and were told "to just wait till the ...


7

The issue I take with this is: While some of us enjoy teaching others (manager included), it takes up my and other team members’ time, without much benefit to the product - time which could be otherwise spent in development. Is the product owner okay with the time spent on the training? If your manager is that person, then clearly the answer is yes, ...


7

In general, you want to hire people who have a proven history of success in the role you hire them for and who share your vision for the company. It’s not expected that you have in-depth knowledge of every skill your subordinates/partners possess (though it helps to have at least a high level understanding of what they’re doing.) Don’t confuse leadership ...


7

1) That last paragraph is interesting. Wanda is your boss? So you, the technical lead of a development team, and by transitivity your entire team, is managed by someone who does not know jack about technology? How are they supposed to know if you are performing well, poorly, or at all? That seems like a recipe for disaster in itself. Project leads ...


6

Some observations: A scrum master is not a manager, except in top-down driven fake scrum. A scrum master is more of a coach to help the various participants stay on track. If this company gets more funding, you will spend a lot of time planning, recruiting, hiring, and putting together a team. That's what early hires do at startups, regardless of job title....


6

How I can properly suggest this to my team leader ? "Hey, boss, team X is using tool Y and it saves them Z hours every week". It's as simple as that. Do it in a chat, wait for a team meeting, send an email - only you know your boss & company culture, so only you can decide how to say it - but that's what to say. If you present a clear benefit (minus ...


6

I've been in this situation but I've got invited to plenty of interviews in other industries. The clue is: to stress your functional experience. What field are you working in functionally? E.g. if you're in sales you can try to switch to a different industry into sales. Always stress that you are a sales system expert. Of course it's more difficult if you ...


5

Unless he's directly causing or threatening harm to you or anyone else, mind your own business or take it up directly with him. Not his employer. And if he is posing an obvious physical threat to you or anyone, then take it to the police. Not his employer.


5

You are overwhelmed. Your workload is too large/disorganised and as such you are unable to manage the amount of work you are expected to do in the time allocated for your role. First; talk to your boss. I know they've helped you and they are the 'best boss you've had' and probably helped you in your role/career numerous times and that you feel like you don'...


5

They might just not like you personally, but be perfectly capable - aside from appearing cold - to not let that influence their professional evaluation. I don't particularly like a few colleagues personally either, but absolutely respect their professional competency and work well with them together. I'd just not invite them to a tea party. And that's ...


5

Your risks are multiple and varied. You could become the next target of Max's machinations if you get on his bad side (or if he decides that he should be the one leading the team, etc.) You could be fired if his lying is found out and it's obvious that as his superior you knew about and failed to correct (or even condoned) his behavior Max might leave or ...


5

Based on your username, it seems that you're new to management. In most organizations, a person's manager is responsible for determining what tasks they work on. If an employee doesn't like their assigned tasks, they are typically welcome to provide that feedback, but ultimately, it's the manager's call, not theirs. On the one hand, you want your employees ...


5

Since I'm taking from granted that everyone's motivated by at least slightly different things, I will challenge the fact that employee motivation's best handled by randomly grabbing in a list of ideas you then implement. So many startups fall into the "we have a ping pong table" kind of argument it became a laughing matter between employees. give out ...


5

give out extra $ for certain achieved goals (and if, how do you define goals and check them?) That's not going to keep employees motivated and engaged, that's just going to force their focus in a particular direction. You're basically shifting them to a commission based paycheck. do you provide days/hours when they can do "their own thing" and perhaps ...


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