168

As a leader, this information needs to be held in confidence. While one of your responsibilities is to protect the company, sharing this information actually doesn't do that. It sets up a condition where trust is eroded on both sides of the relationship. What you CAN do with this information is to seek opportunities within your company that meet the extra ...


157

The problem here is not the web browsing, but that his work output is not satisfactory. You need to address this like any other performance issue: set clear expectations and hold them accountable. For example, agree on what you expect to be done by Friday and get them to commit to it. If he delivers, all good, just keep doing this. If he does not, ask them ...


115

You've put yourself into a position where you are a MINO (manager in name only). Here's the situation: The team wasn't performing The previous manager was fired You were brought in to fix the problem You allowed the same behaviors to continue, and you're getting the same results. To resolve it, first realize Old Lamplighter's first rule: More of what does ...


98

This is one of the cursed problems of IT: Accurate estimates are impossible; they are more of an expression of uncertainty. Holding people accountable for their own estimates can lead to overinflation of estimates. Delegating estimation to someone not doing the work is going to lead to stress and suboptimal solutions, like programming to a spec rather than ...


91

You should absolutely worry. You should also get your butt in gear and get cracking on some of your deliverables. You can stall your boss, but don't ever lie to them. It's one thing to have an employee who has slacked and owned up to it while showing the gusto to get back to providing the proper output. Lying to your boss is straight out and out firing ...


90

You've got two problems. First, and most obvious problem: you don't have the authority to actually make your subordinate work, and you don't have the authority to fire them. Worse, it's your head on the chopping block for their bad performance. In your shoes, here is what I would do with Tim (giving your report a name, since I didn't see on in the post.) ...


28

Just ask the employee if you are allowed to share that information or not. Perhaps they want you to share it, so you can use it as leverage on your boss to get a counter-offer out of them. Perhaps they want you to fight for improvements for everyone, so they would agree to share it anonymously as leverage to improve the work conditions of the whole team. (&...


22

Hold meetings every two hours to increase productivity? That's just an obvious plain crazy idea. How can this even be considered seriously? However if you really need arguments against this idea. As said before, more time in meetings = more time not doing any actual work. Most of the time nothing meaningful will have changed in the last two hours. It's ...


21

You need to have a conversation. If there is any doubt about in your mind about this situation, you need to start by giving your colleague the benefit of it. Ask about what you have seen, and see if they have an explanation. Why? A manager, you can see reduced productivity for several reasons: your staff are not working the hours that they should your team ...


20

What is the best way to deal with the situation? You hand in your resignation only after you have signed a written offer from a new company. You do not tell your boss at any point prior that you are planning on leaving the company. By telling your boss early, you only put yourself at a disadvantage and risk being terminated prior to securing a new job. It ...


20

You're thinking of it as employees asking for handouts for no reason. Not at all. The raise request is a courtesy notice They are telling you that they are thinking about money and their market value, and they are either looking or already have found a better offer elsewhere. “I need a raise” - “No” - “Here’s my notice” ... is exactly the sequence you ...


18

If you have an official role as a career advisor, it seems only logical that what you can/can't share with whom is spelled out in your job description. Your job is to help these employees achieve their career goals, so it seems the best thing you can do is find out what those goals are. What is this employee looking for in the new company that they are ...


17

I have a Graduate Certificate in Women and Gender Studies. I have studied multiple dimensions of diversity (gender, race, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, nationality, etc.), with a primary focus on women. I also have a Masters Degree in Computer Science and have worked as a software engineer for almost 20 years. With regards to women in the ...


17

MANY others are in the same situation as you: working-from-home during the pandemic and suffering massive productivity drops. Tragically, this often isn't something that folks can admit to and talk about with their co-workers and managers. I disagree with @JoelEtherton who says the solution here is merely to "get cracking on deliverables" and do &...


15

I'll try to answer the question you're asking as best I can (even if I don't necessarily agree with the premise.) Likely, the core problem you're running into isn't the mechanism for selecting candidates, or anything on that front. And to be frank, it's actually illegal to use race as a selection criteria. However, there is a definite potential for bias in ...


10

Do you have double the work to do/potentially double the work to do? In these trying times, there is probably not double the work to do. Companies are buying less. Governments are buying more, but only of specific things. Customers are being stingy. Doubling your productivity would just mean that they could do with half the employees in your department. When ...


10

My manager has been managing a remote team (everyone works in a different office) for years (the team has existed for 3+ years now). And she originally got the job partially because she had experience managing remote teams (and mostly because she is really good at handling her people). And one of her first questions she has for me everytime we have a one-on-...


8

Question for you: do you want to keep any employees? With all due respect[1], you sound like a terrible manager to work for. You don't have trust in your employees, and you are willing to put them at risk for marginal productivity gains. My advice: change your attitude. 1. I refer you to Sir Humphrey Appleby.


7

I want to clear up some common misconceptions that you seem to believe: It's impossible for a software developer to stay focused on programming for 8 hours per day. For most developers, you should probably count yourself quite lucky if they can even reach half of that on a consistent, day by day basis. Studies and surveys have found that software developers ...


7

First of all, your notice period is stated in your local labor laws and your work contract. You are under no obligation to tell your boss about your resignation a second earlier. Should you still be open about telling your boss anyway? Reasons for yes: When your boss asks you to tell him before you take a job somewhere else, then that implies that he is ...


7

Make it a tool for yourself, then lead by example You can make the tool anyway and improve your own performance by using it. If at a certain point it turns out you get better results, people might become interested after the fact. You're not just making a tool. You're endangering their jobs (or at least the possibility), they're protecting their jobs (which ...


7

Do whatever you can to have something to show them by the next meeting. Take proactive action to prevent this from happening, such as setting up a daily stand up or weekly meeting. Don't lie and be honest and don't try to hide if they ask you directly why you are behind. Other people can see straight through bullshit so better to be seen an employee who ...


6

Every standup will cost over half an hour in lost productivity. See this article in particular the cited scientific study. There's a reason scrum standups normally take place at the start of the day - the idea is they help get you started, not interrupt you once you have focus. So two questions - is it true? Is team productivity down? If so you must have an ...


6

Full disclosure: I fit into several "diversity" groups myself. First, check and see if you don't already have it. Many people, especially those of us who are older, don't advertise some traits that fall under the "diversity" umbrella. LGBTQ people were usually "in the closet", as back in the day being "out" was far ...


6

I do not hold the decision to fire, promote or hire someone. This means the faster you can prepare for the change, the better. Now, this also depends on your relationship with your boss. In my case I would straight go to him to tell him someone may be leaving to start to fight for a hiring ticket, assess whether someone for another team would be a good ...


6

I'll add this tack, which I didn't see among the other answers: You might be (or have been) suffering from depression induced by the covid annoyance. Contact a mental health professional and get some counseling. Hopefully this will help your slacking. Then, when you confess to your boss that you've had much trouble focusing, you can show that you've ...


5

What is hard as a manager is keeping your team members motivated. If they are motivated, they will make their best every day. In this case, I would discuss with him getting more information about how he feels these days, and trying to know what makes him less motivated than before. I think the best way to lead your team is to know deeply how the members are ...


5

Trust is something very, very valuable. You worked hard to build the trust. By passing this information on, you destroy the trust, and not just for that person, but for everyone. That will be more damaging for the company than any possible gain. Until an employee gives notice, you don't know whether they will be leaving or not. So don't do anything rash. If ...


5

Let me re-iterate what you just said: I am firmly against this, as I think they are more effective at the office and I can see if they're slacking off. "I think" has no business in a professional decision making, it must be based on facts. Unless you have sufficient data to prove your point, don't jump to conclusion and make decisions based on ...


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