126

From your description of his behaviour and other actions, it seems the most likely result of any attempt to put your boss/founder "in his place" is that you will be fired - no matter how diplomatically you go about it. Brush up your resume and go find a better job where you won't be getting cut off at the knees.


108

Yes, the real world is a lot different to what you are taught at university. When you work for a business, the job is to make a profit, not deliver software according to an idealised software development process. A lot of the time these things overlap, but not always. It is perfectly legitimate to "cut corners" from time to time. While you may lament that ...


80

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


66

First, I am sorry for your condition, and I wish that you get well soon. However, I do not see a real problem in what happened, even if your assumption / worries are (partially) founded. Please keep in mind the following information: A company has the right to hire (fully) anyone at any time, without informing employees. A company has the right to hire (...


58

Your company seems like, what I call, a generator. It's there to generate cost (more costs, less taxes) and generate hireable employees. Like a HR department combined with boot camp. Your own manager seems to be aware of this and just wants to get paid, as he realizes that he doesn't have to create anything because that is not the purpose of the company. ...


57

I think you are misreading the social cues here. From the now-deleted screenshot of the chat, the sequence of postings is: You make a posting asking for better quality toilet paper. Someone (M) makes a straightforward reply that you need to go to facilities, who handle this. You then post asking if a bidet spray is an option. Another person (A) posts that ...


26

"How do you put him in his place?" You have this the wrong way round, its his company, he pays you. If all the others are correct and your company is a unloved child, then the best thing to do is ask the boss how he wants you to run it. You seem to be doing a good job of finding good employees for his favourite company, ask him what else he expects from ...


26

I seriously doubt that AR is going to mock you for asking about better toilet paper. What he will mock you for is acting as if a juvenile joke about toilet paper is a personal attack against you. If you take this mishmash to HR they are most likely to tell you that just because you have a sensitive asshole it is no reason for you to be a sensitive asshole. ...


21

Software development is about managing risk in unknown or uncertain environments while frequently doing novel work. Making tradeoffs about time, scope, and quality happen all the time. The important thing to do is to help stakeholders understand the impact of their decisions on the project. To me, responses of "quit the job" or "blow the whistle" would be ...


19

Yes, technical debt is a perfectly valid decision in many cases; just like taking out real debt is a valid business decision in many cases to advance the business goals. (We'll make $$$ if we had $ capital to invest in the business, so getting a loan for $ and paying $$ back still puts us ahead in the long run.) But in my opinion skipping automated tests is ...


17

In the software industry, most companies have flexible hours. This does not mean that laziness is allowed; what it means is that as long as projects are done on schedule, no one cares too much about exact working hours, lunch breaks etc. As long as projects are done on schedule. That is, if the project that was supposed to be done in 6 months is indeed done ...


17

Because they'll move to other IT roles. Software Engineer is sometimes an entry-level job and people may move to other roles after some years. They become IT architects, IT product managers, IT consultants, etc. A few even switch to non-technical roles, like project managers or Agile coaches. Even though they are still working in IT, they are less likely ...


16

He's the boss, this seems ok for a startup if he has two companies. He's bolstering one at the expense of the other. To me it looks like you're in the throwaway company. Lots of legitimate reasons he might have for doing this. A surprising amount of startups are just funding mines and throwaways. More and more all the time. You're not the boss, so it's not ...


14

So, what should I do to make PMs accountable and give us proper requirements ? The moment you or your coworkers see an unclear requirement immediately ask for clarification. If you see such 'timeOfEvent' field and it is unclear proceed to ask the sort of questions you wrote here (what format we want the time? should this be triggered on creation? etc.). ...


13

The way to approach this is to get clarity on the process. Sit down with your bosses and ask them exactly what it means for you to "prove yourself", and how long it will take. I would expect them to give you a definition of what a good shift is, and how long you have to run them to be approved. You should also ask what will happen if you don't prove yourself ...


13

There's one thing in your question that really stands out. For example, when we get a client he tries to make me deliver less than what was promised to them ... That's called "fraud," and it's something you probably don't want to be involved with. Either leave, or figure out the value of the product the owner is ordering you to take off, and talk to a ...


12

Most PMs/BAs seem to set the requirements well for stories where we have to develop UI, i.e. things you can see on a screen. But, for non-UI things like APIs, they either don't provide requirements or provide superficial requirements. I've a general observation that many non-tech people do not understand detailed nuisances of technical details. It seems to ...


12

She also added that she didnt appreciate the fact that I contacted her during HER vacation with her family as it wasnt a work emergency and was not an important issue to have me disturb her Your boss is clearly pissed off with you because you contacted her during vacation. She has mentioned it clearly wasn't a work emergency, and not something to disturb ...


11

There are many reasons for this. One is that yes, it is in their contract. If I'm making a million a year somewhere and you ask me to give that up and come and work for you, and then it doesn't work out and I can't get things accomplished with the team and resources provided, so I have to leave, then I will get X as compensation for wasting my time and ...


11

You can and need to find a new job. Here are the key points why: Your communications have been rarely listened and definitely not addressed You are being asked to sacrifice your weekends (no harm if they pay you well and it does not affect your life negatively) You are being told that you don't work hard enough although you single-handedly worked on the ...


11

You did bring it up, and he gave you an answer. Which was not a good answer, not the one you were hoping for. If you know the catering company, try to see if they have any gluten-free options in their menu. You boss may think he has to organise lunch from a seperate place, which may not be the case. Otherwise, you will have to bring your lunch in from home....


10

Young workers are preferred because they don't have family and other non-work obligations and thus are willing to dedicate insane amounts of time to the company's projects, and as importantly, they're cheap, contra your suggestion that they're better paid.


10

The other answer addressed the plain reading of your question, mine will address a reading that is a little different. If you are doing as well as you state, your next most logical role is one in which you are expected to lead others. You state you're not a strong programmer, which isn't a requirement to make sure projects are implemented on time and with ...


10

This is where I'm not particularly happy about the situation and feel like it has been mismanaged. Before a reply had even been written to me, they had already deemed it appropriate to start a hiring process and hold interviews, then lied to me about the stage they were at. They simply don't need your permission to seek for a cover for your work. I didn't ...


9

First of all, I just want to say that I wouldn't be overly concerned around the discussion of "religion". It could be interpreted to be a cultural thing, rather than a religious thing. There are many places in the world where Christmas is not really a religious holiday. You got tentative approval to take holiday at the end of November - start of December. ...


9

Owners set the goals, managers execute them In all companies, the role of managers is to execute goals set to them by the company owner(s), possibly (in larger companies) through a intermediary structure like the board. As a manager, including the general manager or CEO, you are an agent of the owner, given stewardship over their company (it's not yours ...


8

Before asking your manager anything I would suggest that you work on your resume and start applying to new companies. The situation at your company does not look good from what you have described and you need to be prepared for the worst case scenario. Also, asking your manager likely won't be helpful. If you are going to be laid of and he knows it, he ...


8

Buy him out. If he's undermining the business, but he's in charge because he has money, there's one obvious method of removing that control: spending your own money to buy out the shares he owns in the company. Whether you're taking loans to finance this, getting all the other employees to stump up a bit of money to buy shares, getting other investors to ...


8

You put him in his place by either founding another company or joining an existing company that aligns with your work ethics. You take all the good workers with you and make good money with your company long after he's gone bankrupt. For the current company, it's his, and thus it will be run like he wants it. Unless whatever he does is criminal and you can ...


8

What you call "shortcuts" are really trade-offs, and they are inherent in any project, in any discipline, you will undertake. It is inescapable. There is an idiom in the engineering world (yes, I put this in a comment above): You can do it well, you can do it fast, or you can do cheap. In the best case, you get to pick 2, so the decision needs to be made on ...


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