194

Why do remote companies require working in the US? Those companies are likely based in the US and don't want to deal with the legal and tax complexities of having employees who live in multiple countries. It is complicated enough for some companies to deal with employees from various states within the US. Also having employees from around the world will ...


125

Your IT guy is way out of bounds and is putting people at risk by clearly overstepping his role, so you don't need to be extra careful. Given them a chance to make it right. Submit a formal ticket (or e-mail) asking for VPN to be re-enabled ( you want a paper trail) Tell the person that you appreciate their concerns but that this not acceptable and you ...


91

You can use this as an opening to start a conversation about pay - it's not really what they are asking though IMHO. Really they are wanting to know what would help you in doing your job. Whether that's new/updated tools (e.g. the Macbook) or whether it's a change to business processes or workflow, think about what gets in the way of doing your job and ...


89

There are many potential reasons for a company to discriminate based upon your country. Tax Reasons Taxes can get very complex, very quickly. Even if your country allows you to take on all of the tax responsibilities, which is relatively uncommon, the company will have to spend money even getting an expert on your country's laws to confirm this. Otherwise, ...


87

This was a private communication between Bill and Sue and you only saw it because she was sharing her screen. Have you ever made such a comment like that yourself to someone else privately? Now did he do it on purpose, knowing that you would see it? Short of a confession from Bill, that's an impossible thing to say. But either way, having filed a complaint ...


84

Alice openly expresses her dislike for Bob (to me, the rest of the team, and sometimes customers) Expressing dislike of a teammate to a customer is such an egregious violation of the norms of professional behavior that I'd warn her never to do that again, and fire her if she did so.


82

If this is at the company's recommendation and you would be incurring additional costs that you wouldn't face normally I think it's reasonable to ask for reimbursement, either that or ask whether it would be feasible to get the data plan increased for the company mobile. The latter option might well be easier for the company to deal with as they won't have ...


71

I'll go a bit further than the other answers here and say... you're the bad guy in this situation. Bill did something stupid. He was trying to vent about a meeting going too long, and did so in a manner that he didn't realize was accidentally public. Everyone laughed - and chances are, they were laughing at Bill doing something that stupid. I can ...


46

There is nothing wrong with two employees not liking each other, provided they conduct themselves in a professional manner. For instance, it is very bad that Alice tells others that she does not like Bob. That is unprofessional and unacceptable. Regardless of how they feel about each other, as a manager you need to have an expectation that they communicate ...


45

Buyer's remorse is a real thing. You are feeling the new job equivalent of buyer's remorse. Remind yourself that if you didn't take the new job, you'd still be at your old job. You know, the one that was not challenging you. The one that was letting your skills stagnate until you probably couldn't easily land another job. Sure, there will be new ...


43

Your first step should be to inform your direct manager about the situation and the details that you outlined in your question. I would also gauge his/her reaction carefully to see how they respond to the information you provide. It's quite possible that the CEO and upper management don't want to consider work from home at all and are simply using the ...


41

How should I approach this situation? I would report the IT guy to whomever you think is the most appropriate (possibly his manager or your manager) immediately. Deliberately lying as such in a professional environment is grounds for immediate dismissal regardless of coronavirus or not. I would be very wary about having someone like this employed by the ...


35

Keep business and personal separate. If you are already provided a company resource for internet connectivity then use it. If you reach your limit on this resource, then let your company know and let them fix the issue. If they need you to continue to work remotely, it is their responsibility to make sure that you can.


31

Did Bill really bully me and create a hostile environment No. Reasonable people won't agree that sending a chat message to one person about you that is accidentally viewed by several others was intentional or directed at you. am I just being too sensitive? You are you. Your feelings are real. All I can say is that I would have reacted differently based on ...


26

Life becomes much better when you don’t take things personally This has happened to me, although instead it was someone who just forgot to mute their mic and was talking to themselves. I just promised to be brief and that was the end of it. Bill is not an attacker. Bill is someone who was frustrated about a meeting dragging on (as they often do for no real ...


23

You should ask for whatever you feel you need from a professional perspective to be more effective in working with the remote company, just be ready to justify each request in an appropriate manner. You mention, for example, a MacBook. If you need one for concrete, professional reasons you should ask for it, explaining your reasons, such as video editing, ...


20

In light of the current situation, I'd say, your (or any individual's) health is of paramount importance, and if anything can be done to ensure safety - it should be done. Your direct supervisor may not be having the same mindset as the government / company owner / common people - but they need to follow the directives from the company owner (higher ...


19

Go over there, don't try to fix it by calls. Get the three of you in a room. Explain the situation as you experience it. Explain the consequences of their behavior towards customers, team performance and their professional advance. Listen to their side of the story, do not judge them. Ask them how they think the situation can improve and what they think is ...


18

I disagree with the suggestion to "give them a chance". This is no time for being polite. Go straight to the CEO and senior management and tell them they were lied to, with all the details. The IT guy could be criminally liable for it and the company itself could be criminally liable for not following govt directives during a state of emergency. Remember ...


15

The short form is that you need to grow a thicker skin and get over it. Yes, Bill was being an idiot. It doesn't seem like he intended those messages for you, which doesn't make them right but also means he wasn't trying to attack you directly. It's fine to bring that to HR, though you might have started with your manager. You could not have, since he ...


14

It is perfectly fine to ask this during an interview, and working from home is becoming more common now, especially for workers with kids at home or other responsibilities. At some point during the interview they will usually ask you if you have any questions. This is a good time to ask some questions, such as "will I usually be working from this office", "...


14

Its a reasonable ask, especially given the current situation. My current workplace is scrambling to setup remote access which was previous denied for "Security reasons". Some Argument points you can bring up If you do get sick you won't be able to work. You need time to recover The more travelling and people you are around, the higher the chance of you ...


14

Talk about the specific small tasks you've been working on. You don't need to (and shouldn't) go into much detail, but "I've been entering the financial data for the previous month into our reporting system, and it's all going smoothly" or something similar about whatever you've actually been doing is good. This will give your team confidence that you're ...


13

As per your comments the lack of equipment never stopped you from working from home before, quite the opposite, this is something you repeatedly wanted. And now that company mandates you to WFH (and for good reasons), you want to out of spite refuse to do it. You can call it "principle" or whatever, but whatever issues you have with the workplace, there are ...


12

I think the only mistake you made was referring to it as a "sad demo." You shouldn't criticize your own work, especially when you aren't the sole contributor. In doing so, you kind of dragged your coworker down with you. What you could have done was to proudly demo the work that you had and if someone asked about the missing feature, said something along ...


12

It's always reasonable to make a reasonable request. You should be prepared to have your request denied, though. It may be reasonable to ask your company's bosses or your local politicians to put pressure on the internet service provider to lower their rates to help their customers deal with this pandemic.


12

Keep it simple and get the questions on a side channel, for instance email,slack or SMS, when it is time for a question read out loud for everyone to hear it and answer it. This way there will be no wasted time switching presenter, having problems to unmute the microphone or having a voice which no one can hear.


11

How should I answer this question? Can I ask for financial needs or the macbook that I want to buy? Of course. I'd say there's a few categories you can mention here: Pay - This is probably not what they're directly getting at - I would take this as "how can we make your life better at work", not "how can we fairly compensate you for the work you're doing". ...


11

Okay, I will start with the obligatory: HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND! What Bill did was a but unprofessional and a bit immature. However, your response was an overreaction of the first order. In your question, you stated that this was a one-off event, and not part of a pattern. Additionally, he apologized. Instead of accepting the apology, you went to HR and ...


10

As a permanent employee, your employer will have tax and social security costs related to you, which would be complicated by your being in a different country. Your employer would not necessarily know what these implications are, and there is no incentive for them to find out; they can generally get an equivalently qualified employee in the USA. The easy ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible