New answers tagged

1

Two additional suggestions that haven't been suggested: Ear defenders and/or earbuds. Noise cancelling headphones are a gimmick mostly for any kind of noisy environment. But ear defenders are fantastic. I am not autistic but I really hate loud noises and certain background noises in offices, such as a place I worked with a guy who typed REALLY loudly on ...


7

Background Many great answers already, but as another autistic individual I wanted to add my 2 cents. Oh, and like the rest, disclaimer: autism is not one single thing, it's a wide spectrum of traits with varying severities. Also I'm going to say "employee" a lot because "autist" or "autistic individual" sounds ridiculous if you say it more than twice, just ...


5

I'm retired now, but I had a long career of battling for a little elbow room and understanding from my various employers. The number one problem I had over the decades was that the employers would not hear me when I asked for small accommodations. If you want to make the workplace less stressful for the spectrum, so that they don't miss work to decompress ...


3

I'm on the high-functioning end of the spectrum, and I can't really add to the various lists of accommodations already present. However, I have had some downright traumatic experiences with intrusive accommodations, so I thought I'd chime in with a few observations. First of all, it shouldn't need saying but an employee's medical record should be handled on ...


4

I'm a high functioning autistic person as well, having worked in multiple office environments. There are a lot of good suggestions that were given in the other answers but i'd like to add a few as well, that have benefited me: The power of stop Make sure that a colleague on the spectrum has a way to signal do not disturb. I had a coding job in an open ...


15

I'm an autistic, verbal woman. Here are some ideas based on what I need to have at work to be able to work properly and from what I read in literature and found to be useful but have never tried myself. What I use: noise-cancelling headphones are more than a nice to have, it's vital to me. Getting the company to invest in good sets for every employee is a ...


25

headphones with noise-canceling provided to reduce the noise disturbances of an office environment. That's a cheap crappy workaround which doesn't even work that well. Noise cancelling headphones are good at blocking the sound of someone outside with a pneumatic drill, but not at blocking the sound of colleagues talking. The real solution is to go back ...


45

As the OP and other answers have acknowledged, autistic people vary tremendously and there's no one-size fits all approach, but some things that are often worth considering: Reduce intrusive stimuli. Noise and flickering lights have already been mentioned, but think also about the other senses. Scents (perfume, air "fresheners", tuna fish) can be problems ...


3

Why not provide noise canceling headphones to everyone? You don't need to show autistic notice from a doctor to like working in silence. Why "meditation room" not be avaiable for others to "chill out". Other people are not in stressful situation? As a functioning person with autism - don't treat is at a special thing. There is NO, and I cannot stress is ...


3

The ideas you have so far are good but won't cover all of the possible issues that need to be addressed. You'll probably want to adjust the way you give tasks to autistic people. You'll want to make your directions more precise. Eg: Bad: Find out what you can about this local event Better: Get onto Facebook, Google and Twitter, search for this local ...


117

Full disclosure: I am a high-functioning autistic. I'm going to offer a few ideas that will benefit the greater workforce as well as the autistic employee, that way, everyone benefits. Since autism is a spectrum, it varies, but: Don't call anything a "safe space", it's insulting. We don't need safety, we need a good work environment. Lights that don't ...


0

It is impossible to answer this question in its current state. There is no bandaid solution to accommodate the wide range of the autistic spectrum in a list of actions. You can't say "do these three things and people with autism are better accommodated". You can say "this autistic person is stressed by a certain situation, and doing these three things ...


2

The accepted answer by Richard gives a good range of strategies which are appropriate to a wide range of situations. You're unlikely to go wrong taking those options. The one I'm going to suggest is much more specialised, and often it won't be the right fit, but it's worth being aware of since occasionally it can be very effective: Get inside the process ...


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