New answers tagged

1

There's a difference between sincere praise and empty flattery. If the praise is sincere, it'll probably be appreciated, even if the person doing the praising is much more or less senior than the person they're praising. Most everyone enjoys being genuinely appreciated for something they did well. However, what you're describing is empty flattery, and it ...


0

Adding to Joel Etherton's answer: Avoid using deprecating humor (where others are the subject, self-deprecating humor is ok) Avoid speaking of positions-- high or low-- in a derogatory manner, even if the context is 3rd party. This has a lot of problems. I think whoever made this must have been a junior. Avoid abstracting praise P1: Susan did a great job ...


0

And, hey ... "maybe he is sincere!" As many people have said: "be very generous with praise." (As long as you really mean it. And, quite possibly, he really does.)


1

The best way to avoid sounding insincere is, well, to be sincere. Praise things that you honestly find praiseworthy. Understand the company culture with respect to how praise happens-- some companies are very "rah rah" and encourage people to praise each other loudly and publicly, others are much more reserved. As for patronizing, what you praise ...


5

There is such a thing as "too much" and there is also such a thing as "the wrong time". Praise is a funny thing because it really can be used to do the exact opposite, and abusing it reduces its value tremendously. Some thoughts on how I handle praise Keep it simple and direct. Say what you mean exactly. Keep it targeted at the right ...


2

He replied "No. I don't mean to be rude, but..." and cut his sentence, staying inactive. I was kind of speechless, because ... We could guess all sorts of things that he was going to say. There would be an indefinite number. My feeling is that you were so busy being shocked because he hadn't learned your childhood lessons, that you simply didn't ...


4

What makes you certain he didn't thank him? I doubt you are aware of all conversations (both in person and telecommunication) that your co-worker is privy to. Regardless though: This comes across as looking for something to be upset over as opposed to an actual grievance. Lets look at what you have put forward as options and see if they sound like reasonable ...


5

When accepting the apprenticeship, Jack probably thought that he would get valuable work-experience regarding systems integration. Not that he would spend many hours fixing old people's computers. When working on the computer of that old man he didn't learn much related to his study/future line of work, which is the idea of an apprenticeship. I think the ...


20

Either mind your own business, or engage with him in a constructive way. You are blowing a minor slight way out of proportion, and one customers are certainly not going to notice. Furthermore, you are showing exactly zero interest in why this happened. Perhaps the part after the "but..." was "but I had to listen to that old guy's racist ...


21

Why don't lead by example instead of trying to "teach"? As you mentioned, Jake is junior and still learning things, (maybe both professionally and personally). Next time you see the senior resident, thank him for his kindness in front of others, preferably the junior being present. The time after, never lose an opportunity to thank someone, be in ...


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