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However, I've recently had an incident where something offensive made its way into code documentation ... I've been going through his past code and any code he submits: things like this pop up very rarely, but I've found a couple others from past code If your company use git for version control, you can set up some git hooks to: prevent him ...


0

As someone with a child on the autistic spectrum, I have some experience with the subject. And I think I can recognise an autistic spectrum disorder, or autistic traits, in people. My personal belief (so it's not supported by any kind of evidence) is that while an autistic spectrum disorder can be an explanation for certain behaviour, it cannot be an excuse ...


1

Once you crossed that line of being verbally there's no going back. It's hard to defend oneself on the topic after that. In any case, I simply point out the wrong things people do, for the most part. Often, my own people would belittle me, sometimes at the most inappropriate times, as when it's just been shown or come to light as to otherwise. Mostly base ...


-2

So far it sounds like you believe he is a racist autistic person. You had several people make complaints and you defended him by saying he didn't meant it and probably brought up he is autistic. I would cease this immediately. This opens the door to a major lawsuit: you isolate him, tell people he's autistic, and that management is thinking about firing him....


-1

I would approach it like the risk management situation it is. An employee, regardless of mental handi-capable status, can still put the company in financial risk should she make a statement that winds up in court and is interpreted as 'Hate Speech'. Treat the situation like any other like situation ...even if it risks losing a very productive worker...all ...


2

Talk to a psychologist. A psychologist, someone who studies and understands autism and similar traits a lot better than you (and we here at workplace) do, can help you understand this person better. It is perfectly normal to go to a psychologist to better understand a particular individual and how to deal with them (and in many cases how to reduce the ...


14

You are discriminating against your employee because you think he is autistic (you don't mention that he has been diagnosed with any documented disability, so this just your armchair diagnosis to begin with). As an autist and a manager myself, you have to treat your autistic employee the same as your neurotypical employees. Instead, you appear to be giving ...


-7

I've found a couple others [insults] from past code (nothing since the incident, when I talked to him). You had a problem and already fixed it. For the meantime, you don't have to do anything.


4

In the following I assume that you want to help him to improve. Say this explicitly in terms like "Your code is fine but there are things that are unacceptable to others that we need to do something about together as your work is important to us." Peer review all his deliveries. Modern version control tools make this easy. Make it absolutely clear ...


5

This depends on what your exact goal is. Because from this situation arise several goals, some of which conflict or interact with each other. Do you want to minimize rocking the boat and resolve this as quickly and quietly as possible to help the engineer in question not make similar missteps in the future and educate him about not sabotaging himself ...


114

If you're dealing with someone that has problems with social interaction and social cues, one thing to do is ask yourself: Do they comply with instructions? The reason I ask that is because... well, some people are just jerks. It's not that they can't understand interpersonal aspects - they simply don't care. However, from the sounds of it, your coworker ...


-3

The best solution is don't change anything. the solution has historically been to try to isolate him from people he is likely to offend, and just let him keep doing his own thing He's producing high quality work. He isn't causing problems to the company (as long as you keep him apart from those he has an issue with) and you said he doesn't put anything ...


0

Please don't overthink this. It's a difference in personal style. You can take a moment or two to explain your personal style: Have a private conversation with this person, where nobody else can overhear. Tell him you are a private person and you wish he would stop the unwanted behavior. "When you said yesterday, 'Why are you in a bad mood?' it felt ...


-3

Quite obviously he does not know a lot about you, or doesn’t care about your feelings one bit, or he would have known that his actions upset you and would have stopped. What he does is just a cheap parlour trick. The way to stop it is to demonstrate to everyone it doesn’t work. The next time he pretends to know something about you, you straight contradict ...


0

It is nigh impossible to change someone else's behaviour, the only control you have is in how you react to their behaviour. Next time your colleague finishes your sentence or pre-emptively starts a task he knows you need done, speak to him: Tell him that you prefer a certain procedure in how things are done and that he needs to clarify with you before he ...


24

It seems that you have the unexpected interpersonal / workplace problem: the one between your colleague and the other colleagues :) And you are uncomfortable, that they have no problem :) I wish he would either not socialize with coworkers Of course, the first thing that you MUST do is accept things: the social skills of other people are not your concern ...


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