New answers tagged

4

You enter the truthiest value. When you graduated and got your diploma, from institution B, your GPA was 2.5. So that's the number you put. Then you don't have to go back and double-check yourself when you get the job offer and they do a background check on you. There are at least 2-3 questions per week on this site of the form "I lied on my resume ...


4

Input what is shown on your transcript. Most transcripts should show this, regardless of how the credit is split or whatever. It makes it MUCH simpler to verify without doing a bunch of math. If you are able to calculate a higher GPA using extra credits, you have the option of putting that as additional information, but I wouldn't spend too much time doing ...


3

HR doesn't care about your CV. Or almost never cares. The only parts that might matter are things related to specific job requirements, because if you later have an issue they can rely on those to fire you (if you didn't meet requirements) or to cover themselves. This might apply to education - e.g., if a job requires a 4-year degree then your CV showing ...


5

Congratulations for the new job offer. You are overthinking it. Full time employees are more valuable in the job market than interns, as showed by the total compensation. You should have mentioned that you were a full time employee at that time, it would give you a little bit more power during offer negotiation. I am afraid it is too late and I will lose ...


7

Your location might matter, but in the US your resume is marketing material, not some legal document--there's just no requirement to list everything on your resume. So you would be perfectly fine to leave it off deliberately or accidentally. (It's actually really common to leave things off. When you're young you're usually including everything just to pad ...


80

This is a non-issue. Your current company hasn’t changed, only your position/role/title.


22

This seems like an honest mistake - an omission on your part. Since you haven't lied about your position, but simply forgotten to update your CV, I would expect the worst outcome to be a question with regards to this. I can hardly imagine them retracting the job offer over this. If they do, you may want to approach them, but this may also be considered ...


11

The problem with freelance experience The problem from am employer's point of view is that "Freelancer" listed in the job history doesn't provide any useful information. Working as a Freelancer can mean anything from "highly skilled and efficient worker with great communication skills", to "did some small jobs for family and friends ...


0

Assuming the actual work you were doing as a freelancer is roughly equivalent to the work you would be doing as a full-time employee, the real difference is basically what you say here: "my first time working in an environment like this alongside other developers" Working in an organization and on a team like this is a skill in itself and it's ...


0

What matters is results, not who you were working for. People don't care who was paying you, but are wary of applicants listing "Freelancing" when what is means is "unemployed." The old term as "consulting." Frankly, not having a job isn't such a problem any more as it used to be, but you may still find biases in hiring ...


2

Were you happy with the salary (I don't know your country and your age)? Did you learn things? If you answer "yes" to both questions, then you're fine personally. You were absolutely correct to accept the job. It seems nobody said you were not worth your money, just that they think they need someone more experienced. It's not how things usually ...


0

So, all else being equal solid work experience is normally preferable to freelancing experience. IMHO I would say that being able to successfully freelance puts you ahead of full time employment experience. Instead of: Do the work you have been assigned Get paid by your employer You have had to potentially: Market your services Find the work Estimate ...


36

I just am wondering how potential employers are even going to view my time spent freelancing. Doing projects and freelancing isn't the same as working a regular job. But the specifics matter. It might be as good. It might be better. But it's clearly different. And that difference is something you will need to address with a hiring manager. It might show ...


5

It all depends on the employer. The ideal way a freelancer going into a job does so, is with people who already know them. It's certainly experience, but the quality is unknown, so it's often judged as lesser value for a couple of reasons. Firstly if you're a freelancer looking for a job then it implies you're a failure as a freelancer. Secondly it says ...


3

What does this experience count as? It counts as experience! Working as a freelancer is still experienced and you should definitely list it, discuss it, and use it to your advantage. however, I am aiming for stability and full-time employment. So you supported yourself with freelance work. That's GREAT! But now you want some stability in your work. ...


8

The reason I am asking about this: do you think I should have refused the offer because I was aware that I’m a junior and that things may get too advanced for my level or that it’s something they do in freelance to hire a junior and then move to senior as things level up? As long as you make it clear to them what your skills and experience are (and ...


1

I think there are a few steps we can take to address some of your pain points. First of all, the most important and concrete step you can take is to improve your communication with your superiors. It sounds like you started this task, and you did not immediately know how to solve it. That is normal and acceptable; after all, they pay you to solve problems, ...


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