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1

I studied Aerospace Engineering in the UK and discovered that universities have no problem with churning out 20 times as many graduates as there are entry level jobs. They driven by the demand from students who want to study the subject, not the amount of recruits the industry needs. In your position, it's possible that there are even fewer entry level jobs. ...


0

I did a double major in Physics and computer science. I always wanted to work in technology roles, but got stuck doing boring commercial work. It sounds like you are going to have a lot of trouble getting the exact career you want, maybe you can use your science background to further your career in IT, data science or machine learning may provide you a ...


0

Stop trying to force them to do things your way, and instead learn how they do things. They have numerous regulatory requirements, and potentially large penalties if things go wrong. If a temp comes in and demands that they install a whole bunch of software that they are unfamiliar with, then IT are unlikely to be helpful. That's especially true if you ...


-2

Banks often prefer hiring large numbers of mediocre technical people (Engineers, data scientists etc) rather than a few excellent ones. They really don't trust their staff to not do silly things so they make it impossible to do risky things. The fact that this kills productivity is often irrelevant to them. I spent many years at a large bank trying to adopt ...


0

Depends on the background check company. I had a background check where they absolutely had to contact every past job on my resume and held things up for a week when they had problems reaching one. After that I took the oldest/hardest to reach stuff off of my resume. As Dan Is Fiddling By Firelight said in a comment, they just need HR. Although they will ask ...


0

Here's what they'll check for sure: Your eligibility to be employed in the USA Your credentials (schools, employment status, etc) Here's what they MIGHT check depending on your job: Possibly your criminal history depending on your position (sometimes a speeding/parking ticket might matter if you're going to be hired for a driver) Credit history if you're ...


1

At least everything on the resume, and probably any academic credentials as well. Any job you listed on your resume is certainly fair game, and depending on what position you are up for, they could desire all of your work experience from your entire life. I met a guy at hackathon who complained about having to dig up the name of the ice cream stand he ...


-1

Generally, working independently means that you would be able to implement a full project, given only high-level instructions. Consider this more like project ownership, where you would carry out the full SDLC on your own: meet with the client to develop requirements and get sign-off create the system design and get approval code the solution perform your ...


0

I think the phrase "independent work" refers to problems we face alone, and work we do ourselves without the help of any other person.


11

First and foremost your title is misleading and a bit melodramatic. You are working in an environment that requires a high level of security and has both legal and compliance requirements that they must meet. This includes controlling both applications and network/internet access; it looks to me as if they are applying an adequate level of security and ...


8

Speak to your supervisor and demonstrate to them what restrictions are in place that are preventing you from doing your work. It could be a case of the IT department not having given you the proper access to do your work. Of course, you need to make sure that whatever restrictions are in place are actually preventing you from doing your work rather than ...


1

Nothing wrong having a discussion with your manager, ideally it should be part of your catch-up meeting or more formal 1-to-1. Just state the facts in what is causing you to be unhappy in your current position. Any manager worth their salt should be willing to hear you out. And if you have valid points look to make some changes. After all, it is easier to ...


0

If you're already looking for a new job, just focus on that. There is nothing that can be said to undo what your experiences have been, and even if they correct course, you're still going to have resentment, and will end up looking in a few months anyway. Focus on your job hunt, make sure it's something you will enjoy, and will appreciate your talents and ...


-1

NEVER LET YOUR EMPLOYER KNOW THAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB!! That must be your best kept secret. Lot of unexpected and undesired things can happen if you do that. Regarding changing jobs, the plan should be like this: Find a job, get to the contract phase. Ask the new company to let you have a discussion with your current employer - to give your ...


4

You don't know with any certainty that your manager realises how unhappy you are. Maybe you are the last person he'd want to see leave. Perhaps he would be willing do everything in his power to prevent it. If he doesn't know, he can't change anything for you. You should definitely discuss your current role and responsibilities with him. Explain the aspects ...


9

It's always okay to have a career development discussion with your manager. That typically involves Current State: What's are you currently doing, what are your good/bad at, what do you like/don't like Desired state: where do you want to be in a few years, Alignment: Your manager agrees with your future state The plan: agree on specific steps, actions and ...


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