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I wouldn’t do anything until you have a job offer in writing. You do not want to tell your manager you almost have another job. If a job offer comes your way then you have a decision to make. You will have to weigh the pluses and minuses of each position. I can’t help on which way to go. You have no control over when a job offer comes your way. Don’...


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According to OSHA, you have a right to refuse unsafe work. However, as @MisterPositive suggested, you can (and should according to the regulation) absolutely ask your employer for the right tools. This is part of your duty to: Ask your employer to correct the hazard, or to assign other work.


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You are not given the right tools (gloves, dust mask, etc). You probably need to look at OSHA Regulations. The issue isn't that it's unrelated to your job description, it's that it's a safety hazard. There's contact information on their site you can use to ask questions and find out what your rights are. You are asked to remove floor tile from an office. ...


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Can you refuse this task? Yes you can. You can also most likely be terminated too. Take a look at your employment contract, employee handbook, etc. Most companies have this little clause "and other duties as necessary" that is designed to be a catch all for other miscellaneous crap the company may need you to do. You might want to check with your ...


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You put down on your CV things that make you look good. It's a showcase of your skills, abilities and personality. If the jobs that you've been fired from don't showcase any of your relevant skills towards your target part time job. Then don't list the job at all. When they ask for a list of previous jobs, then you would state jobs that you've been fired ...


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The amount of time you should wait would depend on what reason you were given for not getting the job. For your case specifically, where you were told it was because of "not enough experience", then I would wait at least a year, probably more. The main question you need to consider is whether the amount of experience you have gained during your time working ...


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There's no real set "rule" for this - if you've been passed over by a company for a given reason then there's no point in re-applying until the reason no longer applies. If they have passed you over for "not enough experience" then that can be a little nebulous. If it's "not enough general experience" then you are unlikely to be able to significantly change ...


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Reach out to a recruiter and ask when they suggest you apply. A recruiter for the position you're interested in will be able to best advise you considering your total experience. Companies will frequently relax experience requirements if you demonstrate capabilities another way - a recruiter can help you find ways to do just that. Keeping in touch with ...


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In general, no one can tell, as this is based on the company recruiting guidelines. And sometimes people change and the guidelines with them. Best is to ask whether it makes sense to reapply and when! Most companies will happily tell you their current guidelines. If you are very lucky they might also give you personal feedback as to how much sense it makes ...


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