New answers tagged

0

Yes, they are trying to lowball you and they've explicitly admit that by saing that it is "company routine" to ask applicants their last pay slip during the interviewing process in order to better match the offer to the applicants' needs Honestly, what better match in the offer they could do basing on the payslip? The payslip doesn't say anything ...


0

Asking for a pay slip is indeed a tactic which allows to lowball you by limiting their offer to an amount you're expected to accept. Actually, asking how much you'd like to get is a variant of the same tactic: if they were ready to offer you $100k and you said you'd work for $50k, there's no way you'd get what you're worth. There is no law against asking ...


17

I personally use a small, decorative travel makeup bag that holds my sanitary supplies and some single-use packs of Advil. I fill it at home and take the whole pouch with me to the restroom, so there's no smuggling supplies from one bag to another or into my hand. In the fairly unlikely chance that someone even notices what I am carrying, it can easily be ...


11

Talk to your office manager to organize sanitary packages for the bathroom. That should include things like disposable tooth brushes, antiseptic mouthwash, pads, toilet disposable wet naps (alternative to dry toilet paper), etc. Having those things in the bathroom is not only a great convenience, but also a subtle way to remind everybody about hygiene. Now,...


36

Having your period is part of being a woman and completely normal. There is nothing to be ashamed of. If you feel uncomfortable taking out single pads from your bag bring a small purse that holds your pads in your bag. You can also consider placing a box of pads in the bathroom with a sign that reads Emergency stock. Help yourself and consider filling it ...


9

You could treat them as what they are: Normal hygiene items. Just put a Box on the toilet. I know a lot of people doing that already, in the guest toilet, as well as restaurants/cafes having those available for their guests. If you have female visitors/clients on site, they might appreciate it in a time of an emergency. Get one of those larger handbags for ...


25

I think small metal boxes are available at most apothecaries to store and carry pads. I use them and they are quite practical. But, seriously, there's nothing embarrassing in having the period. If a group of grown men are feeling awkward for this reason, it's definitely their problem, not yours


0

I will start admitting I have not thoroughly read the other answers, just got a feeling enough to know nobody has expressed the same idea, correct me if I am wrong. I am from Italy, I work in consulting (not so smallish) and I will go against the other answers by saying: This is normal, everybody does that, it is not a problem. I have been asked my pay ...


3

I think the approach mentioned above, namely saying that "my NDA with my current company prevents me from revealing such proprietary information", which, quite frankly is probably true when strictly interpreted. And it has the added bonus that an NDA actually serves to benefit you for once. But I think the approach here is to offer an alternative. "My NDA ...


3

In general I agree with the prevailing NO: the HR guy told me that is "company routine" to ask the last pay slip to applicants IMHO the obvious answer is that it is your personal routine to decline any such requests, That being said, I can see one exception, though, where showing the payslip doesn't hurt and can help speed up burocracy: if you are ...


1

I'd like to provide another angle for this question as both I and people I know have been asked to provide their a payslip from a current or previous employer for the purposes of verifying current / previous employment. (country: Netherlands) In these cases it was perfectly fine to black out any salary information and/or amounts as long as it remained clear ...


3

Others have given good answers, but the final way to answer this (after simply saying no) is to say that at the end of the day the place you're applying to is technically a competitor. Letting them know how your current company compensates its employees is highly valuable knowledge and giving it up is unethical. Telling them this will hopefully make them ...


8

I have seen this happening systematically and repeatedly. Note that your mileage/kms may vary within the precise European country you are talking about, the working sector, and the fact that the company is either public or private. I get the distinct feeling they're trying to lowball me (and everyone else) You. Are. Correct. In a number of EU countries (...


22

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) In the EU, there is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This covers the processing of personal data. Even if you agree to provide evidence of your current/previous salary, you should be careful that your GDPR rights are not violated. GDPR requires that any information to be collected must be adequate, ...


1

Negotiate to furnish payslips after joining the company to avoid negotiation based on it. Many companies (at least in my country) ask for payslips from previous employers for "verification purposes". This is done to avoid candidates who fake their current pay and negotiate for a higher pay. In such cases, you don't need to furnish the payslips while ...


5

This is what I'd say: I understand it's your "company routine" to ask for a payslip during the interview. But please note that it's not my routine at all. Make me an offer first. Should I accept your offer, then we can talk about payslips then. That being said, you are under no obligation to even say that. You could just say. I'm sorry, but ...


15

Your current company most likely doesn't want you to divulge what they are paying someone to a competitor. Likewise, the new company won't want you to divulge what they will paying you to a competitor, so it is quite unprofessional to expect you to tell them the same information. Apart from that, a payslip does contain personal information beyond the pure ...


283

My usual answer is, "I don't ever disclose my current compensation package, but I can tell you that I need a total compensation figure of $###,000.00 to leave my current role." That statement ends the conversation more often than not (which is what it is supposed to do). If they balk at my requirement, what's the point of continuing talks? Only serious ...


47

You say “I’m sorry, that’s personal information and won’t be able to provide it.” That is then the only response you provide on the subject. There’s no magic, you just politely say no. You don’t need a law to cite, you just politely say no. As long as you don’t start to waffle, it is firm. Obviously this may end up being a dealbreaker, but this gives ...


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


9

It is noble that you intend to be transparent with your new employer. However, it's important to remember that until your girlfriend has accepted a firm offer and made a clear commitment to her potential new employer, the plans you're talking about are essentially hopes and not concrete plans. And, to be clear, it doesn't make sense to be transparent about ...


0

Since no other answer has put it simply... 11 physical hours is not the same as 11 work hours. (According to this Law SE answer) I imagine the company has something like 1 hour lunch and a 30 minute break (or two 15 minute breaks). I've had this setup in two different countries in three different industries, so I don't think this assumption is ...


1

I suggest to check how well the startup is holding its "startup promises". These generally are: You are allowed to work, at least part time, on your dream tasks that would not be so easily accessible for you in a normal company. You can learn things you want to learn and gain lots of experience. You are offered shares, but not some "options", "coupons" or ...


11

My recent employer gave us a course to clarify German laws "for a given reason" and I will try to pass them on, as I've seen in some comments the same things that came up there. Let's begin with some kind of translation, which really isn't that easy. Werktag means a day that is usually worked on, seen for all the professions that exist. As Sunday is the ...


5

First of all, you should confirm that you are actually supposed to work from 07:00 to 20:00. It is quite possible that these are merely business hours, but you are only expected to work 8-9 hours within these 11 hours. It is quite possible that teams even have overlapping shifts to cover the whole range, or that you have a certain "liberty" of starting ...


4

It is illegal in both Germany and EU to work 11 hrs per day, and the company must know that already, I dont think they are dumb that much to tell you something like that because you can report the company. IMHO, the working hours are supposed to be 8 am till 7 pm it means the working hours that you are allowed to work within, you can work your 8 hrs ...


3

Your situation is somewhat comparable to our office. Context We are a small development team and are part of a much larger company, however we have our own office. The company as well as our team has a strong focus on culture. There are summer and winter activities, sometimes we are asked to do promotional videos, or pictures and often we decide to do ...


1

TL;DR I can't speak for German law, but in general a job offer is not the final step in the job-hunting process. What seems to be missing is active communication with the hiring manager or employer. If you have questions about the offer or the company culture, ask the employer rather than strangers on the Internet. Analysis [W]orking hours are supposed ...


0

Your personality and your company culture isn’t a natural fit, so... a. You adapt and try to fit in the culture b. Don’t change anything and see if that slides or if you get singled out c. Have the culture adapt and accommodate you d. Move to an environment that fits you better Now assign probability values to each of the options above and see which ...


10

There seem to be two aspects to your objection, one reasonable and one unreasonable. First, it's entirely reasonable that you don't want "silly things" to be a major distraction from your real work, especially in the form of a time sink. But a firm refusal to ever consider making light of what you do, or especially to consider how odd it may sometimes look ...


39

Working hours 8am to 7pm does not mean you work from 08:00 to 19:00. It means you are only allowed to work in this time frame. See also: Business hours "8-20" at a car dealer does not mean you have to buy cars for 12 hours, it means you can buy cars in this time frame.


2

In my opinion most company "social" departments are run by extroverts. As this role in the company, usually caters to their needs. Their main weapon is peer pressure. In my company, it also started out with these "integration activities". Many people had lots of fun with it. But as time has progressed, many like-minded people have opted-out. A few ...


64

It has already been pointed out twice in the comments, but not yet included in any answer: German offices jobs typically have an amount of hours you are expected to work each day (typically somewhere between seven and eight hours per day, or 35 to 40 hours per week) and a time frame during which you are expected to spend these eight hours (6 a.m. to 8 p.m. ...


-5

I think without a doctors note you will have no way to get around this except talking to your manager what the problem is and how it makes you feel. If they still insist, make a parody of your boss, get a wig, fake mustache, glasses, typical outfit, typical clothes, whatever makes you look and talk like him. Then you give them a hell of a show and afterwards ...


2

Forget food benefits, that's maybe around 10€ per day, so around 2000€ per year. I think startups do that mostly for their many interns because if they pay them more the interns will have to start paying taxes. Usually you get free coffee, I haven't seen a company without a decent coffee machine that can also do cappuccinos and stuff like that. Free soda is ...


34

I like to work here Firstly you need to be honest with yourself.... you do NOT like working there, you don't like the whole culture, you may enjoy your tasks but that's only part of what it takes to enjoy working somewhere. Once you're honest with yourself you can move forwards and make a decision. Until then the rest of your question is moot. It's ...


4

HI :)I can give a little insight in comparison to US startup culture. I think you are getting a pretty bad deal here. It isn't unusual to work many hours in a startup, but the there are supposed to be more potential benefits in the long run. LONGER DAYS: If you are a founder, or being paid a lot of equity, it is expected and necessary to work longer days. ...


9

The employer is also in breach of the European (EU) Working Time Directive, which limits you to 48hrs/week. Directives, unlike Regulations, must be signed into law by the member-state (Regulations are automatically binding).


163

It feels unethical and even immoral In Germany, it's illegal. As in against the law. The relevant sections are "Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG)" §3: Die werktägliche Arbeitszeit der Arbeitnehmer darf acht Stunden nicht überschreiten. Sie kann auf bis zu zehn Stunden nur verlängert werden, wenn innerhalb von sechs Kalendermonaten oder innerhalb von 24 Wochen im ...


6

is it normal to be asked to work 11 hours/ day? No, not formally Any advice/thoughts other than run for the hills? No


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