203

I just can't work an 8 hour day That is fine - especially if I read it as: "I cannot work non-stop 8 hours a day every day with maximum efficiency". That is not a good target, especially considering the negative impact on your health. It is actually very recommended to take breaks from work, in order to avoid certain work-related health problems. The ...


195

Well, HR screwed up. Your manager shouldn't do anything that gets him into trouble, and nor should you. If HR says nothing can be done, it means someone screwed up and nobody wants to admit they screwed up. You started a week earlier, you worked the week, and you are owed the money. You seem to have plenty of witnesses that you actually worked, and that ...


176

It is perfectly fine to be hired as a contractor, provided that (a) you are treated as a contractor, not an employee (basically: nobody can tell you what to do, and you can at any time get a replacement to do your work), and the payment is adjusted (my rule of thumb is that as a contractor, your daily rate should be about the same as 1/150th of an employee's ...


162

You can make an impact programming and learning outside of your paid work. There are many open source projects out there that are looking for talented individuals to help out. Find something that resonates with you - something you believe in. Possibly something that you will learn from (a different language, framework or area of programming than in your ...


100

The average employee does about 3 hours of work a day If you are not playing on your phone or reading Reddit in those 8 hours, you are either astonishingly productive relative to your peers, insufficiently experienced for your assigned work (not blaming you here), or working for a company like Amazon. I have had software developer friends watch an entire ...


87

Bring this question to a lawyer. If you believe that any laws have been broken, simply quitting could get legally messy since it is unclear what your employment classification is. A labor attorney would do a much better job of explaining what your options are in this situation than we ever could.


86

"Throwing a sickie", i.e. taking a sick day, is the time-honoured solution to this perennial problem. Yes it is not exactly 100% factual, and that may be considered lying or, in extreme viewpoints, unethical. But really it is the only practical option you have and whilst no-one will admit it, it is what everyone does when they cannot get legitimate time off,...


67

Fact: You gave your employer a lot of your time for free, and they will not respect you one bit for it. They like the status quo, that you work your ass off without additional pay. They like that very much. It will be close to impossible to convince your current employer that this should be otherwise. You will even have trouble to convince your employer ...


52

Most IT jobs have some routine work that needs to be done, such as organizing mail folders, tidying a physical desk, responding to non-urgent e-mails, watering the office plants, improving the documentation on the code you are currently working on, improving test cases, reviewing your calendar for the next day to check that you are prepared for any meetings.....


48

heh, interesting! I've gone through the same! I worked about 2.5 years for a rather small company! I would stay till 21:00 or even more at office, and even do some stuff before going to sleep at home or even at the middle of night when I couldn't sleep. Even skipping my university classes to work more. (I know) But I actually ruined everything instead of ...


40

Why continue working for an internship salary when I can get a big full-time salary right now? Only you can answer this question. If you have nothing left to gain, consider accepting full time work and getting your career in gear. If you have multiple job offers, weigh the pros and cons of each and make an informed decision. I know leaving my ...


32

Firstly you work for a horrible company. Anywhere that tries to make it difficult for staff to leave rather than address the reasons people want to leave is not a good place. Based on that you need to look after your own career, and I would suggest you take the following steps: When offered an interview see if you can schedule an interview a month in ...


32

You may be looking for a managers perspective, so allow me to chime in. I have the same arrangement for some members of my team. I've got a gal that comes in at 6am and leaves sometime between 3-5pm whereas I've got a tech that comes in at 8am and you better believe he's out at 5pm. In any case - open and clear communication is paramount between you and ...


29

I can't speak for other countries, but if you're American, you might want to have a look at how to file a complaint with the Wage and Hour Division if HR keeps trying to avoid going to the trouble of paying you. I was managing a store for a small business, and HR didn't pay one of my terminated employees everything she felt she was owed. A lady came in ...


26

I solved this problem by asking the interviewer during the interview. The key is framing it as a work-life balance question, rather than a "how much do I have to work?" question. One consideration: is this a salaried or hourly position? This is important to know. I know software engineers are generally salaried for FTE, but that's not the rule. Are you ...


22

All the answers above are great. I have been working in software now for about 25 years professionally and I can say many things on this topic: The idea of working 8 hours per day on software regularly and with consistent productivity is a bizarre one, unrelated to reality in any way. I have never worked in all those 25 years in any group of people who have ...


19

Nirth, Until you sign a contract, you've really only made an "agreement to negotiate". This phase is just a green-light for your manager to get the ball rolling with HR. Someone's got to generate the contract or offer letter. I think Wesley Long's right about what you're seeing in the paperwork as far as copyrights and patents are concerned. This is ...


19

if they are paying you with a check they aren't paying you under the table. They use a check when they want a paper trail, they use cash when they don't want to a paper trail. If they were classifying you as a employee they would have had you complete a W-4 (both Federal and the state version). If they are planning on having work as a contractor they should ...


18

Most employers are not legally allowed to pay you for that much work on a consistent basis. If they were, they would bully their employees into burnout mode. If you really are able to keep that kind of productivity up for sustained periods, and you love it, there's really only one option. Consider what you're saying in your question - you put in all these ...


18

The IRS and the federal Department of Labor have a number of good resources about this problem. It's a predicament that has become fairly common, unfortunately, but it's definitely one you can work through so I wouldn't recommend leaving the job simply due to a potential misclassification. Given the information that you provided, the IRS may consider you a ...


18

Full time mean 40 hours a week (unless you have a better ”kollektivavtal” a contract between the union and employer, in that case it might be a little bit less) Permanent Job (in Swedish ”Fast anställning” ) means that there is no time limit on your employment (the official term is ”tillsvidare” meaning ongoing). Unless you are badly missbehaving (in which ...


17

I have never worked anywhere where 9-5 was acceptable, not in government work, not in small privately-held companies, not in large corporations. Most places you are expected to put in 8 work hours and lunch does not count and is not paid. From the US Department of Labor (http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/workhours/breaks.htm): Bona fide meal periods (...


17

It's legal, they can do this, and you should have raised the issue then and there. Much more importantly, in case you ever get a similar situation owing to a bank error or a tax refund error, you should not have spent the money because it wasn't yours to begin with. Try to seek an arrangement with them.


16

There are some things you're kind of missing I think in the whole situation. First, the fact that you have full benefits is a huge value. I'm sure you're young, so you don't see these benefits as being any value because you likely rarely avail yourself of them. I know when I was in my 20's I had full medical, but since I was never sick, only very rarely ...


16

Think seriously about working for yourself, you have reached the pinnacle of that job. You have become super efficient and you need to make it pay off. I did this years ago and make more than 10 times the money. I was servicing 9 clients while the next best performing engineer was servicing 3 and most were servicing only 2. I did get regular pay rises but ...


15

At several previous employers, we called in and took a "mental health day". We used sick leave for it. However, not every employer is quite so forward thinking. I do not consider it unethical to take a sick day in order to interview for a new position when your current position appears in jeopardy. The loss of a job, and the worry associated with it, is ...


15

Other answers have covered this much better but quickly I'd like to reiterate that it's completely fine to move to a new position given you provide notice. Many people, particularly in the Software industry will take interviews while in employment and might hop between companies (especially start-ups). What sticks out to me from your question is that no, ...


15

Investigate the following: Why they are so interested in locking you in? Is it just something they do with all employees? Are you going to be stuck on some crappy legacy project? Are you about to start a time sensitive project where they do not want delays? Will you be handling corporate secrets, so they do not want you jumping ship? Are there just a few ...


14

There is nothing wrong with asking about possibilities of staying on as a fulltime employee but it is what occurs before that which is most important. By sticking to the list below you can almost ensure that you can stay on fulltime. As an intern it is your responsibility to show your supervisor and others within the organization that you have what it takes,...


14

You've got your foot in the door, that's the hard part. From here I would make sure the work you are given is impeccable. You've got to build a stable of good references to offset the bad ones. As an aside, a lot of this reads as my problems are everyone else's fault. Most of the time, when it comes to conflicts like the ones you describe, the truth is ...


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