New answers tagged

6

I want to change back to J's team. How do I go about it? You can go to J and ask if there's any appropriate vacancies, but beyond that you may be out of luck. Just because you've been on J's team in the past doesn't mean there's a free ticket back - that would be quite unusual. Instead of giving the acknowledgement for F's success, it was a mere stepping ...


4

Note that there is nothing you can do now. So firstly, I think it's worth saying that you are by far not alone in this. Performance reviews to many people can feel like a "make-or-break" situation, and can feel like a massive "unknown" that could either push your career forward or hold it back. However, the reality is that your performance review is simply ...


3

There's a technique known as grounding which might help you in this situation. Sit in a comfortable chair with your feet on the floor and focus yourself on your 5 senses. Something you can see. In the room or out of the window. Something you can hear. The traffic outside, a bird singing. Something you can touch. The chair you're in, your hair, your ...


0

What can I do to solve my problem other than seeking professional help? Not a lot, keep busy, find interesting things to do outside work, but realistically we all deal with this when we know we may be taken to task over something we did wrong or badly. The best thing is to put it into perspective in terms of how important it really is to you. Whats the ...


-2

First of all, for feedback of this kind in general, you should absolutely be as truthful as possible, meaning everything you say should be rooted as closely as possible in the truth. How candid you should be is another matter, and making that decision calls for further assessment of the context. Remember that the purpose of criticism is to be helpful. The ...


5

I think you're worrying unnecessarily. If your boss had serious issues with your work, they should have told you long ago. Most likely, your boss just has a lot of other things to worry about and has no complaints. It feels like I should have more to show for 6 months of work No, even an experienced developer takes months to produce anything significant ...


3

Don't worry, you're doing fine. it always seems like it takes me longer to complete tasks than I think it should 6 month probation All of this is very common, even standard experience of a junior developer. Keep improving, focus on the task you're given, don't worry, you're doing fine.


0

You don't complain during a review. It's not the time for it. You are being evaluated and hoping to get a raise. It's the one day out of the year you need to be the most positive and team-playery. Any of this you can state as a positive, now that's money. "I think I have been excelling at my job, in fact, here, this documentation shows I've been solving ...


-2

Don't bother complaining at review time It doesn't matter if they lied to you (they probably didn't; they're probably not very experienced at managing and don't realize this is a problem for you). It doesn't matter why your management hasn't put in the effort to solve your problem, what matters is that there hasn't been a solution. You've been talking about ...


2

In a comment, you clarified your question as, when should I talk about this then Ideally, you should never literally complain - although, that's a bit of a semantic argument. Instead of thinking of this as a complaint, frame it as an opportunity. That seems like a bit of silly management speak, but there's value in approaching problems as opportunities ...


1

Rather than saying something along the lines of "these are all the things I hate" frame it as "these are all the reasons you need me". The idea of an annual review is to show the company all the ways you are doing well and for them to talk to you about ways you can improve. Never aim to compare yourself to others, or bad mouth your colleagues. Don't tell ...


2

Normally, you should approach management about this topic after a performance review, so you would be impacted much. BUT, you also want a salary increase. That makes things more difficult. So you are left with pretty much one option. Discuss the topic during the evaluation review - more specifically, during setting the targets for the next year. Of course, ...


2

It very much depends how big a deal it is to you and what you want from the annual review. If you just want a raise then you normally keep the review positive. If you're upset enough to contemplate leaving then you have nothing to lose by pointing out what it would take for you to stay. Because a review can work both ways. Job satisfaction is a big deal to ...


2

You are ambitious and want to advance. That is good. Most companies like it when employees want to take more responsibility. Instead of "fighting" for your advancement, I suggest you ask for advice. "What can I do to prepare myself for more responsibilities here at Initrode?" If you can find a mentor who is not your manager, that might be helpful. A ...


6

Consider that at will works in both directions. If your employer doesn't like you, they can get rid of you (as long as it's not for something protected, like age, race, etc). Similarly, if you're unhappy with your employer, you're totally free to go work elsewhere without repercussions. Of course, reality is often more complicated than that, but it can be ...


1

If capability isn't valued and you feel yourself capable, then you should start to look for other employment opportunities. whatever comes out of the current situation, this company seems to be a bad fit for you in the long run. Do whatever keeps you employed while searching for a company that's capability-driven, there are many of them out there. Good ...


4

If you decline the promotion and someone else gets it then you'll be waiting even longer for a promotion and the pay raise you want. Realistically, you should accept the promotion now assuming you can handle the responsibility. You can lightly ask about the pay raise conditions but don't make it seem like an ultimatum. Switching jobs has become the norm ...


13

Realistically, you should never turn down a merit promotion. While you are correct, you might be eligible for a bigger raise next year, that likely assumes the promotion and salary budget of the company is going to increase significantly. More than likely, the budget the company has to promote people stays relatively the same, and the new range of raises is ...


15

The appraisal system in our company is going to change next year. What if is the new rule is called off for some reason? What if the rules and policies change, after you decline the promotion this time, offering more-or-less the same as now? What if any other associated terms and conditions are changed, so somehow you become non-eligible for the promotion ...


91

If you want to actually take the promotion, discuss the problem with the manager suggesting you for the promotion. I would love to accept right now, but I have calculated that if I accept now, it would actually be a loss to me due to how we are changing to the new system next year. As I am committed to stay in the company long-term, that works out to a ...


8

Therefore, I was thinking about the consequences of declining a potential promotion this year. I do understand that decline the potential promotion this year gives no guarantee that I will get it next year. What is the best way to approach this situation? Think it through now. Be prepared when and if the promotion is offered. Be quick with a ...


3

Yes, whatever revision you want to have in your payout, the performance review is the event to discuss about it. It does not matter at what time the payout takes place (for bonus), having a clear idea on your expectation (for the organization) and the actual amount agreed (from your side) makes things clear and leaves no room for a surprise at a later point ...


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