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23

Owner is determining raises based on customer work Well, they can determine whatever criteria they want for raise, does not matter. The real question is: do you think you are getting paid enough (including the raise), based on your work and contribution? Forget you've read about the criteria (which is a restricted or confidential information) Approach you ...


8

This year I accidentally read a memo addressed to HR that a lot of weight will be given to how "billable" an employee is. Would it be better to approach my boss before I'm told my raise, because he decides the amount beforehand. Or, when I likely get a small raise, should I argue my case at that time? In general, it's best to be proactive about ...


1

Since you know the situation accidentally, I think you should approach it more elegantly. I would suggest to give you boss signals, ask him or her out for a talk and address your concerns, but from a third person's perspective. Hope this helps.


22

You've broken the cardinal rule. Never accept the counter-offer of your existing employer. What usually happens is that they'll offer you better terms, but often fire you a few months later on their own timetable. In your case, the COO seems to have taken it up a step further, your employer hasn't given you the promised raise, but still has managed to ...


22

If it was me, I'd recommend a couple of things: Get a written commitment of the revised contract Get the pay increase backdated to the original date that it was agreed If I can't get these, I would personally be inclined to start applying for jobs outside again.


1

You could also accept the promotion and then, after some initial period of mastering the new role, begin looking for a new job at the new rank. Assuming there are no contractual or legal concerns. It would make you look more valuable to have a higher role when looking for a new job, in many but not all cases, even if your looking for a position in your ...


18

Do the math. Your company was acquired. Now come the cost-cutting and the downsizing. Option 2 is a lie. Even if you reject the promotion, you still won't get a raise, not a meaningful one at least. And even if you remain a low-level worker, your workload will increase anyway just to make up for the colleagues that will leave your company first. Option 3 ...


1

You may need to decide whether the money or the experience are more important to you. If the money is more important, then I'd be inclined to apply for a job outside the company. You may potentially find it more difficult to find an equivalent role at an outside company (to the role you've been offered a promotion to) since your current employer has had a ...


58

Accept the promotion, the increased responsibility, and the lack of raise. Learn the new job (probably will take 6+ months). Once you're good at it you can look for a new job. Note @Kilisi's answer From the comments, @crueltear may have phrased it better: Accept the promotion, and look for job elsewhere (1 then 3)


2

Ultimately, raises are determined by how much you're bringing to the business and the wider salary market. It's reasonably normal for a promotion to be accompanied by a raise, because you're doing work that has a larger impact. Where it isn't, it usually means that there's a period of proving yourself in the new role before you can have a raise, but once ...


9

You seem to be a logically inclined person, and have clearly outlined the choices you are faced with. And so, it seems to me that you understand what the situation is, but you simply don't like the reality you're facing. Let me ask you this: are you willing to work for 2 years without adequate compensation? Is it financially feasible? Moreover, will this ...


104

When a workplace is getting creative with the money it's a sign that unless you see it as a career company it's best to view it as a stepping stone.


2

Your salary is basically the result of a negotiation between you and your employer. Their aim in the negotiation is to get you do perform your role for the least amount of money possible. (If they are smart, they'll be aiming to pay you enough so your head isn't turned by roles elsewhere). Your aim is to get them to pay you as much as possible to do the role....


5

Anecdotally, I used my first job to gain experience, and my second job to get paid what I wanted. From what I've seen and read, getting a job with a different company is the best way to increase salary even if your company is not ripping you off that badly. What you're describing would be criminal or at least highly suspicious here in the US. Are you ...


5

What would be a good way to solve this without breaking the relationship with the company, Unfortunately, in most cases the only way to solve this is to break the relationship with the company. The company received a bargain when they hired you at well below the market standard. You might receive small raises every now and then, but you will always remain ...


5

I'm unfamiliar with France norms, but the first company I worked for was easily one of the best ones and at the end of my first year, my boss asked me what I wanted for a raise. I had a similar reaction like you wherein I was sweating trying to come up with the 'right' answer on this and asking why would someone make me deal with such a miserable thing. At ...


2

It's a negotiation tactic. Whoever is the first one to name a number in a negotiation is in a weaker position. That side now needs to justify their offer and the other side has no reason to make an offer which is any better than this initial offer. The best counter to this strategy is to make a high-ball offer which you know is more than the other side ...


2

Why does the company not suggest a salary increase instead rather than force an employee to deal with a miserable question? There could be a few reasons: Check how you estimate your value to the company and if you feel over/underpaid; Check how you evaluate your performance; Their suggestion would set the lower bound of the negotiation range, while yours ...


3

The annual inflation is a good number to know but that should be your absolute minimum. If you get less than that you get a real pay cut. Your manager should have to explain why the situation is so bad that this is justified. You seem to have a hard time judging how much increase your personal contribution is worth. Getting an idea here would be best but ...


0

Just make a number up. I've gone from 18k to 30k in much the same manner. I don't really worry about what others are getting or what I'm doing. I work in order to have a steadily increasing standard of living, so I want an amount that will give me that. Don't look at what you need, look at what you want.


7

Not used to the French environment, but I would say it is reasonable that in a negotiation for your salary you have a saying in stating your expectation. Your manager didn't say that your wish will be granted, though. Few points you should consider, as they will probably be considered by your employer, too: how have you performed vs the targets you were ...


0

Take what enderland said (it's always possible that you stay). But even if you leave, it's always better for you to leave with a promotion and a higher salary; this can only be useful when you negotiate a new contract with a new company.


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