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2

If you like your current job and your current salary, you should speak with your current manager. Because if your potential new job slips through the cracks and your current boss learns of it and gets offended you didn't let them know, after this whole incident, you may be worse off. It also doesn't hurt to speak with HR to ask what the process should be. ...


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I'm surprised this hasn't gotten more responses. Putting some possibilities out there to maybe stimulate others with more big-company experience than me to respond. This feels a bit weird to me, do managers in big companies "steal" each other's employees? My feeling is generally no, unless inter-departmental relations are unusually bad. But it is ...


1

I'd do the interview. Any conflict or bruised feelings that might result are things the two managers can sort out amongst themselves (since they still presumably have to work together). I mean, I'd make sure the new prospective manager knew that you were already working for the company, albeit for another manager, but that may not even be an issue, depending ...


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Should I just let it go as it's a very obvious clerical error or should I ask they pay me what amounts to about a months salary? Can you list what country you're in? In the USA, and possibly other 1st world countries, there are numerous case laws in regard to incorrect pay due to paperwork error. The general ruling is, unless your boss initially made a ...


16

My question is how to best proceed from here? Send an email pointing out the mistake, and get it corrected. This is not high school, where we can try finding loopholes (to exploit). Wear your professional hat, accept what is intended.


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