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3

The most obvious trade-off is that you risk "scaring the horses" by simply bulleting under-performers, and being seen as an assassin. The question is not merely whether you think (or some management metric determines) that a person is underperforming, but whether other workers think the target's performance falls far below the norm or that the ...


8

For most managers, the important question is "would we be better off without this person?" Someone who is working 50% as hard that everyone else is still doing some useful work and if you fire them, that work won't get done - or it'll only get done by sacrificing something else. In theory you can recruit a replacement but that could take months, ...


4

There is plenty of history and opinions on this topic. Jack Welch of General Electric got fame (and controversy) for instantiating a "fire the bottom 10% each year" policy. Some people think it's great while some people think it's stupid. More nuanced discussions are here and here. IMO it's up to the manager to figure out whether a poorly ...


3

What could be the trade-offs between managing under-performers or just letting them go? First of all, it is not at all clear (generally speaking) what under-performers are. The first class of under-performers that I see is the fresh graduates, starting their first job. Should companies not even hire beginners / juniors? Economy would collapse in just a few ...


1

You are literally asking how to quantify the unquantifiable. The simple answer is that you can't, by the very definition "unquantifiable". How could you know if used the full array of keywords to google the internet You can't prove a negative. It's impossible to prove that someone exhausted all possible search queries. The onus is on you to put ...


0

I came to a conclusion, quite close to Steve's answer - what should be monitored in this case, is not the output, but rather the dedication and the narrow research skills: (1) is the person intelligent and skilled enough to perform such a task? This is fairly easy to check by assigning a number of smaller and easier tasks. Basically the skilled one would ...


1

Some proof of work as suggested by Al rl is a good start, and I'd recommend that too. On top of that there is one general strategy to avoid overlooking valid options or getting an evaluation right: Let multiple people do the same evaluation independently. Then compare the results and perhaps have them discuss their points of view if they differ. One common ...


10

Normally what you measure in such cases is not output - since that is by your own definition unquantifiable - but the skill, motivation, and intellectual qualities of the person, and their apparent allegiance to your own goals. The presence of these things engenders what might be called "trust". The assumption then is that if a person claims to ...


2

Agree with the others that HR can't help much. You'll get at most a sympathetic ear. What you need is for management to reassess the sales goals. Given their target customer is hurting badly, I would not be surprised if they've done the analyses of what can and cannot be done in the short to mid future, and readjusted goals to more realistic levels. At least ...


6

Ask for a proof of work. If you want him to compare softwares ask him for a report in any form on such items. If he can test those ask for a live presentation to prove that he familiarised himself with the task needed and have some mastery of it after putting in some work. If the information that you are asking for cannot be retreive he will be able to say ...


13

This is a business problem, not an HR problem. While you might talk to HR about what you can do to get a better handle on things (coping mechanisms, techniques for handling stress, etc.), or what other opportunities might exist for you at the company... this isn't a problem they can directly solve. They can't make the situation less difficult for you. They ...


6

It's too early to go to HR, and I am not even sure HR is the correct person to talk to about this. As I understand, the bottom line here is: You can't do your planned work because of certain restrictions (COVID) and management understands that. Now, you have some bandwidth to spare which you want to devote to some other productive work. Very good! Do some ...


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