New answers tagged

-6

What is a good number of lines of code for the purposes of stack ranking? You need simple statistics. Ask developers for a trial for a week. Measure the number of lines they commit per day. You will need to make sure your experiment is random (google random sampling if you don't know). Your sample size shouldn't be too small, more than 10? Measure the ...


2

Seems to me as a programmer to be a terrible metric, as it would promote writing bad code just to increase the lines of code you write in a day. For example take a simple loop: for(i=0;i<=9;i++){ doSomething(i); } Now my productibity is 3, but if I did it the bad way: doSomething(0); doSomething(1); doSomething(2); doSomething(3); doSomething(4); ...


3

management wants a numerical assessment of all employees in the company. All employees? Fair enough. What is a reasonable number of decisions that a manager should make each day?


-1

Everyone has noted that "number of lines" is a bad idea. But, at the same time, management wanting an assessment of employees isn't a bad idea. How else do they know who is performing well, which divisions have better talent and so on. It is true that "someone will try to game the system". But that isn't actually a reason to not have a system. It is a ...


6

I had a wise boss once who said "A good software developer can double his rating according to any performance rating, without any increase in productivity". Google for "Microsoft lost years". Stack ranking turned Microsoft into a less than mediocre software company for many years. Because what mattered to people wasn't doing a good job themselves, but ...


13

Lines of code is probably the absolute worst metric you could choose to measure either productivity or effectiveness. What ends up happening is you end up with a lot of code bloat because developers will learn the metric and figure out how to write their code to include the maximum number of lines possible. If you want to measure productivity, team metrics ...


21

Measuring the worth of a coder by the amount of code they produce is not a good idea, and there are several reasons why. Not all code is created equal. Some blocks of code are very simple and can be banged out in minutes, while other blocks of code can be very complicated, taking lots of research, and might require hours or even days to make sure they are ...


2

What is a good number of lines of code for the purposes of stack ranking? A fish. The ONLY value I can think of in this would be to collect the numbers over many developers over many years in the same language then compare the results of developers who were promoted or otherwise deemed stars with those of the ones who weren’t and see if any patterns have ...


5

If you want to spot the really good developers, measure how many lines of code they can delete from the repository every day, while still having the code pass every test. Any fool can write lots of lines of code. Removing them is much harder. If SLOC per day is the measure you use, then people will do everything they can to meet the target. But setting ...


0

I'm a programmer and this is actually a very hard question and it depends on the complexity of the problem. If I'm doing simple stuff I can easily do over 100 lines in an hour, but if I'm working on something difficult the research and logic will slow me down enough to potentially get in only a couple hundred lines in a whole day, if you take into account ...


1

You might be overthinking this, but I would suggest you build up your inventory before going in for your review. There got to be some positive contribution so far. Make a list of your achievements and put a $value to them Try to speak first during your review and highlight your achievements Move on to the challenges you are facing, and talk about how you ...


-1

Stand up and speak in the meeting! Say what you were hired for and what tasks you have been assigned now. I have few points that can help you prepare yourself to say some words in one on one. Did they train you when they assigned you task B? Is it time for performance appraisals at your startup company? (probably that's when the companies makes some weird ...


0

I have a one-on-one soon, any suggestions for what I should say there? I'm very interested in continuing to work for this company and don't want to jeopardize it. You should be asking questions about your work - likely the same questions you should have been asking for the past 6 months: How am I doing? What should I be doing differently? How can I do ...


2

It sounds like you have a good feel of what is going on around you, when your one on one comes up try to be the first to speak and mention that you don't feel that you are doing well and that your expertise is elsewhere and you are finding it hard to contribute and pull your weight. If at that point they say you are getting terminated you have in a small ...


0

There are already good answers, but this is a different approach for your consideration. Take the position that the call center operator has too much work to handle the new leads in a timely manner. As evidence, present logs of leads you have given her and when, if ever, they were called. There is also a bus factor problem with having only one person who is ...


1

The other answers concentrated on dealing with the final, visible result. I will try to go to the core of it. I'm her manager, but even though I'm giving orders ... As a manager, among other things, you do two things: make decisions; assign tasks; Orders are given by dictators or by people in military-like organizations. Stop giving orders, nobody ...


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