New answers tagged

7

Quick answer is keep calm and carry on. It's your first job, so only these things count: Is it ok for your physical & mental health? Are you learning valuable skills? Are you earning ok? Other things, like how the company is doing, whether it's going to survive long-term etc. is not your problem. You will most likely move to a new job in 2-3 years, ...


4

What can you find out about the history of the company? Was it recently purchased by another company? If you company was purchased by a competitor, they may be preparing to shut it down. They have raided it for whatever talent and assets they could get and will soon move its product into the end-of-life phase. This would mean that your former boss declined ...


14

Should I be concerned and if so, what should I be doing? It is normal for an exodus to start sometimes. And devs are especially prone to moving on due to the nature of their work and temperaments. In your case you basically just got there and you're as junior as it gets. Stay and ride it out, there's plenty of room for advancement and you can analyse whats ...


1

He plans to make large portions of the code, much of which is in "Linux Kernel" and "Docker" code, public, due to "an obligation to the FOSS community". Your question is mainly about the human resource aspect, but there is an important piece of information that should be clarified. The GPL license does not force you to make the code "public", you only ...


3

Not answering the question itself, my advice to you, if you say that your product solely relies on your modifications being kept a secret, is to find a new workplace, yesterday! Why? Francis needs no more than going online via an internet-cafe and/or using the free WiFi of a "regular" cafe and using a strong, reliable VPN service, one that doesn't keep logs ...


7

Is there anything from employment laws/standards I can cite to get them to go away, or can they seriously demand I pay them this money? Yes, see below. The government can probably force them to pay what they owe you, and perhaps, even tack on an extra administrative fine of 15% for not having paid you on time in the first place. Will that make them go ...


20

This is not your decision. Do not threaten someone legally if you're not a lawyer. The only person making legal threats, implied or otherwise, should be your legal team. Also, this is not an HR decision. This is a strategic decision that has to be decided by upper management in conjunction with its legal team. As an HR person, your role is to make sure ...


79

I know you did not ask anything on behalf of yourself but humanitarian considerations compel me to strongly advise you to avoid hanging around anywhere near the ass end of your company because that is where it is about to be badly bitten. Your company has made some serious blunders. Not only have they irreparably mangled their relations with their ...


44

Don’t retaliate against Francis. Talk to a lawyer. Your company has been breaking the law with regard to your violations of the GPL, and now one of your employees wants to become a whistleblower. You’re already going to be in enough legal problems from your violations of copyright law; the last thing you want is to get in even more trouble from breaking ...


153

While I won't answer the original problem directly I wish to tackle something tangent to this. And I feel it is important enough to warrant an answer and not a comment. From a comment (and the post) it is established that GPL'ed code is modified and distributed, without distributing also the modifications: We are selling a product with a "custom linux ...


1

Neither side is looking good in this situation, but Francis has already poisoned the office - he needs to go. Advise your directors to sort this as soon as possible. You do not want people like him inside your company. Your company may suffer in the short term, by losing talent, but it'll be less of a problem than you imagine. If it costs eight months ...


145

This situation is spiraling out of control out of anger and frustration. I can't speak to the legal aspect, but it should not have gotten to this stage. You basically gave him nothing in negotiation and then now that he wants to leave, you are acting to trap him in his current position. He is a wounded animal fighting back. The promotion (we'd consider ...


99

Go see a lawyer. My employer has informed me that this was a mistake (they won't communicate it in writing) As a general rule, when companies have the force of law on their side (and even when they don't) they send demands in writing. When they don't, it is usually because they are doing something they don't want someone to see. Who that someone maybe ...


2

Summary: Shit happened. A lot of it was due to Lee (who got himself fired) and Ling (who got himself reprimanded) at the expense of Francis. Francis would be a valuable employee, but is now pissed off (understandably) and shows behaviour that threatens your company (not a good move, and not a clever move). Before Francis went off the rails, the best ...


1

It's a stupid strategy. There are always employees who are confident they will find a job elsewhere, and others who feel it's better to cling to the job they have. The company apparently tries to get rid of the first group. Reality is that these are most likely the people that you want to keep. It's also very low as far as company behaviour goes. I'm ...


0

You should look at the "truth in advertising" laws in Canada. They seem to also apply to telemarketers, not just advertisers. https://www.competitionbureau.gc.ca/eic/site/cb-bc.nsf/eng/04255.html In addition to that, I would consult with a local employment lawyer to make sure you leave no stones unturned. We're not Canadian employment lawyers on this ...


9

Companies with competent management typically don't do much laying-off of their workforce. Companies that don't have competent management typically aren't good at identifying their valuable employees. If a company is laying people off, and they don't know who the valuable employees are, there's not really any good way of knowing whether you'll be cut or not. ...


1

I don't know if the procedure you described is legal. But if for some reason you think that these approaches are fake and only made to identify employees that consider to leave, then you should politely answer that you are not interested. Also you should start looking for a new job, since your current employer doesn't seem to play fair; however, this is ...


19

My manager saw my post and texted me saying she had reported me to HR for it and wont be assigning any more shifts. I shouldn't have done this but I put a screen shot of this text on the group (without any personal information) and she replied by putting screen shots of my text messages she interpreted as rude* and saying there have been multiple ...


2

While your manager has acted quite unprofessionally (and depending on your laws publicly lying about sexual harassment cases might allow you to sue her), criticising the company on a social media group can be a legal reason to end your employment. Normally your manager cannot fire you, someone in HR has to agree. So talking to HR might be worthwhile.


1

We like to give advice of changing job. In this case the manager should known that "claim" should be make to HR and you would know about it. If it's not made to HR then it's a gossip and deflamation. And this is what she basically does. It should be reported to HR as such, especially if a company try to have certain image on SM. And also change jobs. ...


3

Dude. Get out of there. Don't even bother to use them as a reference. I would also say 'lawyer up' but it looks like you've deleted the evidence required to prove your case, if you had one (airing HR-related stuff like this can lead to a hostile working environment, which can be illegal in some jurisdictions, but it's also not like you didn't throw the ...


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