New answers tagged

12

Yes, they would have to pay you in almost all developed countries in the world. You've essentially left (very early) during your probationary period, so the company would have to pay you in full for all the days you have worked thus far, and then terminate your employment contract.


6

Checking FedDev Ontario Small Business Services led me to this other page on employment standards. On it, on the Training Time section we can read (emphasis mine): Training time Time spent by an employee in training that is required by the employer or by law is counted as work time. For example, where the training is required because the employee is ...


0

One more advice for the future: Conditions of employment should be clearly written, on paper (or in an electronic form). Specifically, related to this case, the length of the probation period should be clearly written and known ahead of time, before you even accept the offer. It should be in the job offer they give you, or in places where employment ...


0

When applying for other jobs they ask if I've been fired (for just cause) before. If I was fired before a probationary period ended, does this count? Does my description meet the criteria for probationary period? Yes your description meets the criteria. They are directly asking you if you were fired and you stated that you were fired so you should answer "...


-3

That doesn't sound as if you were fired for just cause but let go in the probationary period. Just cause as I know it is a cause for firing to circumvent labour protection laws. This applies for example if you embessled money, stole from your company, repeatedly didn't show up for work without giving a valid reason or did other things that damaged the ...


6

I would say that getting fired is getting fired, regardless of whether you're in the probation period or not. If the offense was too severe to merit working with you on the issues or otherwise deciding not to proceed with your probation period, then you'd have to tick that box. Most decent companies would attempt to address the issue at hand with a view to ...


2

If you think you're being productive but your manager doesn't, you probably don't understand his priorities, or are missing something he thinks is important. It's also possible that he's not noticing the things you have done if it wasn't the one thing he wanted done. Use these meetings to find out what he expects you to do today. Then at the next meeting ...


1

You put down on your CV things that make you look good. It's a showcase of your skills, abilities and personality. If the jobs that you've been fired from don't showcase any of your relevant skills towards your target part time job. Then don't list the job at all. When they ask for a list of previous jobs, then you would state jobs that you've been fired ...


10

You are experiencing an issue with a company-provided benefit, that is having a severe negative impact on your ability to do your job, and you have already made reasonable efforts to address it with the roomate and even by wearing earplugs. It's absolutely time to go to the person managing your training and explain that the schedule incompatibility with ...


11

What can I do? If you haven't started already, document each occurrence where your roommate disregards your needs (the need to sleep is not trivial). After you have accumulated some data, I would then sit down with your roommate one last time and spell it all out. Review your documentation, emphasizing the impact it has on your ability to sleep, and let ...


49

You left a comment saying: I don't know... he can see all my progress on our Kanban board. I have never been told why we're having these meetings. So instead of jumping to conclusions about being targeted, ask. This is a chance for you to show your competence and initiative by getting a better understanding of what your managers are trying to accomplish....


63

TLDR: Adjust your attitude, use the meetings to your benefit. The meeting basically sounds similar to a daily standup. Those are commonly done in Agile development processes in addition to Jira boards, as personal information can be far more detailed, filtered and allow for better feedback/questions than a board could. So such a meeting can well make sense. ...


15

daily meetings with himself and his manager This makes things a lot easier for you. Just be really complient about anything your manager asks, but at the same time point out that he should/could already know it without the meeting. Bring your laptop to the meeting and project the kanban board. (Or if you don't have a laptop ask the manager if he can ...


3

And you're sure these aren't regular "stand up" meetings? (They don't sound like it, if it's just you and 2 managers). Create a Jira task for "daily update meeting" and log work (time) against it. If it gets moved, log the additional time in between if its insufficient for you to get anything meaningful done. What you're looking to achieve is to document ...


3

Take control of the meetings. If he can't lead these meetings in an efficient and productive manner, then you have to. On the next Monday (or first meeting of the week), go through your Jira list as normal and as efficiently as possible. Then directly move into your workload for the rest of the week, telling him what work items you have and how long they ...


0

There should be a job posting number. That is the most important information to include. It's a good idea to include it in not only in your cover letter but also in the subject line in your email. And yes, you should be emailing it, not trying to hand deliver it. The company should have a system in place for routing the applications to the appropriate hiring ...


0

Your cover letter and resume should be specific to each job that you submit an application for. The header for your letter should be as specific as you can make it (company, name, address). Additionally, you should include a discussion of the particular role you're applying for - avoid using a generic cover letter across multiple applications, doing so is ...


0

You should definitely do research on the company and that research should be reflected in the cover letter. However that should NOT be personal information like names or job titles of people that work there. The only exception would be people you already know that work at the company and have actively agreed act as a reference. Example: "I've previously ...


8

Usually my cover letter just has "dear hiring manager" and the job title. Someone suggested I search on sites like LinkedIn to find the name of the person who hires, and add the companies address and phone number. Is this a good idea? No. This is bordering on cyber stalking and I wouldn’t recommend it. LinkedIn is a service meant to help individuals promote ...


7

The biggest hurdle to starting your own business while working is time management, as you stated. As someone who has and is still currently doing this, you need to figure out how much time you have to work on your business, how much time you need to rest, and go from there. Trying to cram in everything will just get you burnt out, then you'll suffer at you ...


1

This will vary from company to company, so you should definitely check your contract to see if you can. That said, the legal part is not the only one that is important. You also have to consider if the time and effort spent on your business will not impact your current job. We can't really help you with this, it is pretty specific to yourself and your job.


4

Yes, you should ask for the raise. The worst that can reasonably happen is that the managers/owners will decline. Retirement matching benefits are the norm, so your employer was more getting up to standard than giving you a raise (although your total compensation did increase). Year-on-year increases to ensure you don’t see a decline in your real wage are ...


3

If this is occurring in the US, a lot of people go to lunch right at noon. Because it's usual to take an hour lunch, scheduling a meeting at 1 pm probably makes sense to someone who eats at noon. It also has the benefit of keeping the rest of the group on the roughly the same schedule. I prefer to eat later, myself, so the day is broken up more evenly and ...


1

You didn't mention what type of environment you're in (consulting, startup, corporate, etc), but I often see this in the consulting world, where time is tracked as billable. Team meetings aren't billable to clients, which means that people try to limit them and/or schedule them during times when people aren't doing billable work. This results in team ...


11

If they're like some companies I've worked for, that's when they can find an available time for everyone. They probably don't prefer the time...it's just when they can get a free hour for everyone. Don't like it? Speak up directly and tell them this isn't a good time, or block your time on the calendar


2

It stinks to be micromanaged by a committee. If this becomes the norm, you will probably want to get another assignment where they don't do that. In the meantime: Respectfully, try to think of the situation from the point of view of these people. In their minds, some or all of these things may be true. Transitions in people are difficult and a little scary....


4

If you believe you could perform the role well, take ownership of the process. Your team and manager will be grateful for you taking the initiative. What I want: Someone takes ownership ( me or anyone) and communicates with business user, once requirement is finalized document it and explain to the team (if necessary). Stop by your manager’s desk, and ...


4

I can manage this developer+ business analyst role by myself and everyone knew that but they are not letting me alone to do this. What I want This is not my job. Why you are asking this? Don't make this unnecessarily complex, this is simple. Let me do it, don't nag Your question seems to have a one-sided slant to it. "I want this" and "I want ...


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