Hot answers tagged

464

Why didn't they say you didn't have enough experience earlier in the process? Because it isn't true. You had enough experience going in, but you didn't get the job. Now they need to give you a reason why they chose the successful candidate and not you, and that candidate has more experience than you. So now, compared to the successful candidate, you don't ...


281

A really important interview question you should ask is something like this: You are a lot more qualified than is required. Why did you apply to this job? What about this job interests you? Sometimes, people are looking for less responsibility, for a job where they can work and then go home. In that case, someone who is overqualified might be a good ...


257

You have first-hand, relevant experience with how he manages teams. You'd be negligent as a team-player and employee if you did not offer that input, as long as it is objective and non-personal. This is why companies try to cajole frank references from people who have worked with prospective candidates - they feel this information is valuable, when they can ...


228

Meet her for a coffee. (If you're a guy, mention that it's to talk about her career and meet her in a totally non-romantic setting, otherwise she might get scared you are interested in her romantically). During a 1:1 conversation there are plenty of ways you can say something without saying anything that could cost you your job: ask her about her plans - ...


193

How about just talking to him? Many candidates will actually appreciate a later start date. That makes winding down things at your current gig easier. And if you are not strapped for cash, you can take some really relaxed time-off, since there is no work yet to interfere with vacation. So unless he is currently out of work or particularly miserable at his ...


186

Here's a Harvard Business Review study on why diverse teams outperform homogeneous teams. Diverse teams are more innovative and focus on facts better than homogeneous teams. However, it's not as simple as throwing a bunch of different people together and hoping that things work out, as this article points out. Now if you're interested in something beyond ...


175

Let me start by stating that I understand the difficulties you face. While not profoundly deaf, I am legally deaf -- just over the threshold. When I first graduated college I had a lot of concerns about how I could be hired. The first thing I noticed is that almost the entirety of companies that reached out to me about resumes I filled out made initial ...


172

I am sorry for the loss of your boyfriend. Regarding your job issue, there is no need for over-complication. Just contact them and tell them what you told us. Normal English language should do it. Explain how the situation is now different compared to the situation some time ago, when you discussed the last time. Let them know that you are now ready to ...


167

There are a whole pile of reasons: To meet HR policy. Some companies just require that at least X number of people be interviewed for any position. I worked for a bank that required several people be interviewed even if a candidate had already been chosen or even had been specifically headhunted. To make a preferred candidate look good. A friend of mine ...


158

I work in a big IT company (100.000+ employee). Here is what I was told from an HR representative when I was promoted as a manager: We need to hire smart and talented people. Smart and talented people can come from any background, including diverse gender, diverse sexualities, diverse skin color, diverse level of disability, etc... If a division of the ...


155

Your mistake is thinking that this is a bug. It isn't. It's a feature that someone wanted, and the developer implementing it did so without any bugs that we know of. In hindsight, it was a very, very stupid feature. Actually, insanely stupid - but only with the point of view of the year 2021, when every computer on the internet is under constant attack. In ...


140

I find that most situations can be solved by a frank discussion with the people involved seeking to find the best solution for all parties. With that said, have you informed this candidate that they have offensive body odor? If you have, and they have not changed*, then your critique need only say that the candidate does not follow instructions well. If ...


138

I'm developer in your shoes and I had the added challenge of not having done any kind of computing type work before my current job as a Technical Lead at my company. With age comes experience, so often as an "older", I use this term very loosely, developer you bring different skills and competencies to the table. A couple things to note: Leverage your work ...


134

Anyone that behaves like you describe here is, put bluntly, a complete asshole and should be removed from their position ASAP. Is this grounds for going over my boss's head to his boss? To HR? Yes, and yes. Your boss is a danger to your team's future. However, I think the chance of your boss responding in any way positively to being called out on his ...


133

The likelihood that they would re-hire you after firing you for "gross misconduct?" Sorry to be blunt, but the odds are zero. If it was a matter of it being one mistake, and getting a second chance, that second chance would have come in the form of not firing you, and opting for some form of internal discipline, demotion, etc. Since they did dismiss you, ...


130

Should the other candidates get a better chance for the job, or should the best applicant get the position? The best candidate should always get the position. But remember what the term "best" does and doesn't mean. For your particular opening, the best candidate might be one who will accept the low salary, can quickly learn the position, and can grow in ...


124

What is the normal rate of turnover among developers You turnover rate looks insane to me. It's more what I´d expect with callcenter-agents. If you really mean you need to source 35 employees to keep your steady 25 active developers level you'd have a fluctuation rate of 140%. Should be somewhere between 10 and 20%. (In 2017 in the IT sector I found an ...


119

How do I fairly and professionally tell the VP that in my opinion she is not worth interviewing? You aren't being asked if she is worth interviewing. You are being asked for your opinion of her abilities, based on having worked at the same company. You need to indicate your relationship to her. Just because you worked at the same company at the same time, ...


114

If you have legitimate concerns about his performance, speak up. If the entire team effectively quit because he ran the projects into the ground, that's something these people will find quite interesting. Don't disparage his character, etc. Simply stick to the facts. They may listen to you, or they may not. But at least you'll know who you're dealing ...


113

If you want a "solution" so that you don't end up employing them, then consider an exam or test as part of the interview process. Had it done to me, as I said "yes" to having Excel skills... They had a computer with Excel ready and some data to work - just basic stuff if you know what you are doing, but if you don't, it becomes obvious... I know another ...


106

The general problem here is that the "merit" in meritocracy needs to be measured in some quantitative way. It's not an objective or absolute quantity. Organizations or teams that have a blind spot are often not aware that they have a blind spot and hence they won't be able to fill it. Diversity helps you to broaden your definition of merit and create more ...


103

It's impossible for us to know exactly what occurred. What we do know is that every sign seemed good, until the point where you provided your previous salaries. It's possible they realised they could not afford you, and instead elected to look elsewhere. In the future, make sure that salary expectations are managed from the start - just in case this was the ...


101

Interestingly enough, I have had this very same concern expressed, more than one time, to me! And so, I can tell you "from the other side of the fence," that I was absolutely unaware of it. And that, once quietly and tactfully informed of it, I spent considerable time pondering what to do. After all, "I bathe every day." "I put on deodorant just like ...


99

Interviewers/Hiring Managers are human - and as such they aren't going to get it right all the time. This means unfortunately that the occasional person gets hired (or accepted for an internship) who really shouldn't have been. We don't know whether the candidate lied about their experience to the interviewer but from what you've said here: claiming to be ...


96

Should I mention a company's apparent lack of diversity when rejecting their offer? Noooooo. No. Just no. You have nothing to gain and a lot to lose. While you may think that it would be a kind thing to point out that a company or department appears to lack diversity, there's just no way to phrase this that isn't going to come across negatively. You're ...


94

Sounds to me like you don't owe this company any particular allegience -- the key to being ethical with this is separate your business responsibilities from your personal obligation not to harm this person. Send the intern the offer from your corporate email with no comment on its desirability one way or the other. Then phone the intern/meet in person on ...


92

What is the rationale of not offering an existing employee a salary as large as the one offered to a new one? In general, salaries increase over time quicker for new talent versus the standard 3% yearly raise for an existing employee. This is particularly true in IT. This is why you see a 3 to 5 year stay at a particular place of employment when looking ...


90

No, it's not. Discrimination laws are written without regard to which group a party belongs to. Meaning that if a perceived minority discriminates, it's just as illegal. You've specifically stated that you don't hire or consider people who are not chinese. It would seem to me that this fits directly under the laws prohibiting national origin discrimination....


89

I'm considering making the offer while privately advising her to decline it. Are there any ethical, legal, etc. implications that I should be aware of? Or any reason not to do this? Your boss told you to make the offer, and you acknowledge that she deserves the offer. Thus, you have to do it. If she asks you about the offer or company, you can ...


87

Considering I have a positive but strictly professional relationship with my boss, how could I approach him over this issue? It's perfectly reasonable to ask if and when you will be travelling with your boss. Find a quiet time and ask privately. Do not use the phrase "behind my back". Don't talk about "feeling betrayed". Don't indicate that you feel you ...


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