19

What could you lose? Time. What could you win? A job you dream of. It could look very appealing for the employer, that you are so motivated and passionate about the position, and throw in your application again. Finding passionate (intrinsically motivated) people is rare. Personally, I would call you and ask why. Because there must be a good reason.


18

Note: even though the phrasing might not make it clear at every turn, this applies to any and all "diversity markers", for lack of a better name; whether it be race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, neurodiversity, ... Repeatedly listing the whole lot became obtrusive in terms of readability, so I mainly used racial identity as the default ...


9

Internal references usually carry a lot of weight. At least for getting through the screening stage. I’d say it’s well worth giving it another shot. What have you got to lose?


9

Cover letter is not the place for this. Everything in your application should be positive. I also don't want to be 'complaining' about my previous employer to someone who I've never even met I wouldn't even do this in an interview if I were you.


7

TLDR: First, see if the benefit of keeping out false applicants is worth doing it at the expense of legitimate applicants. The biggest thing you need to watch is for the possibility of a Type1-type2 error scenario. You are fearing a type1 error (false positive) so you are looking to prevent it. Any method you employ will produce type2 errors (false negative)...


5

I have never worked in Hardware, but for Software, work experience is better than any degree. The only exception is Government and Academia. They can be incredibly ridiculous with their title fetish. For example they require a BSc for the job, I have been doing for 20 years. Fun fact: The title BSc in Germany only exists since the academic reforms in 2007. ...


4

Easy: "I'm a company that really needs a really good graphic designer – if I can find one." Okay, sales(wo)man, "there's your prospect." You know that you've got what they're [desperately ...] looking for. In fact, you know that you're better than everyone else they might be considering! Your objective is simply: "to convince them ...


4

I don’t know what caused his attitude the second time (could it be because this is a more advanced/serious stage of the interview process, or because after our first interview he got more interesting candidates and he’s no longer that interested in my application, or he was disappointed because he expected me to give better answers during the interview…). ...


3

This very much depends on the field and the company you (want to) work in. I partly disagree with the other answers here, but electrical engineering (in Germany at least) is one of the few fields where, in my experience, academic education can matter more than work experience. I work for a large company in Germany which, among other things, develops and ...


3

I'm sorry this did not work out the way you'd hoped, but you've done all you can. Either they are waiting until a deadline to start deciding, or, I suspect more likely, you are not under serious consideration. Any further inquiries will annoy the decisionmakers, and reduce the scant chance you have at being selected. Once or twice a week for a limited period ...


3

The problem is we're all diverse in terms of how we identify ourselves. None of us are "pure" in terms of race and ethnicity. My mom is Asian, and my dad is of European. If I fill out an application, I check both white and Asian, but if I could only check one, I would check white. Does that mean I am white? Probably not. The same could be said ...


3

I would just reply to the email you got about the DA2 position saying something like this: Could I interview for the Data Specialist 1 position instead? That's the position I had intended to apply for - applying for the Data Analyst position was an accident. Thanks! As for the DA1 position... well, the fact that the above email I typed up didn't specify ...


3

Yes, it is really like that. FROM LINKEDIN Also, from my work with the Dept of Labor, I can confirm this number as what I was taught to use while teaching my classes. This is why making interpersonal connections is so important. The larger the network of people you can drawn on, the better your chances. Now, this does not mean that you know someone, they ...


2

I'm conscious that they might just assume that I'm applying for jobs because freelancing hasn't worked out, or because it's too much of a struggle in the pandemic. And what's wrong with that? Do you think that's a negative thing? Do you think that they think that's a negative thing? There's nothing wrong with telling them that you tried freelancing, that it ...


2

No offense but you sound like a difficult, wishy-washy candidate and I somewhat suspect the recruiter moved on to someone else. I do hope you haven't made many mentions of this application list.... Them knowing you're applying elsewhere on its own isn't much of an issue, but that and many filtering questions may indicate that it will be easy for you to get ...


2

I would probably proceed with DA2 to the first phone screen. That at least gets you a foot in the door and a real person to talk to. There is no harm in checking this out in more detail and you will most likely learn something about the company and the position. If you confirm in the phone screen that the DA position isn't what you want, you can bring up the ...


2

What do you believe I should do in these circumstances? Should I also send a reminder to the guy on LinkedIn? Switch to two mail reminders per day? Try to reach them by phone? Since electronic communication has not been working, I would try reaching out by phone. If you continue to receive the runaround then remove this company from consideration for your ...


1

As I think you understand, we can't answer why this person behaved this way, or begin to guess which of the two sides of them you saw is more genuine, or more common. However, your edit asks whether there is any way to follow up with them, to find out. I would say: very unlikely. It would, at best, require some delicate and tactful way of asking "I ...


1

I found an internal connection to the company (an old colleague) which I can use as an internal reference in my new application. In fact, they dedicated a specific reference field in their online application form. So, it is important to them. Tell your contact what happened. Tell them that you're still interested. Ask them for their advice. If your old ...


1

As @sascha's answer points out, what do you have to lose? My only issue is that we have no way of knowing if they will spot that you have applied before. Possibly they won't but possibly they will and rather than think you have a good reason for applying again, they may assume you are blindly spamming out applications or they may just assume they had a good ...


1

Firstly, looking through the application you posted, I notice several things: This is not an application for a salaried position. The applicant is supposed to be either a graduate/medical student, or already hold a postdoctoral fellow position In fact, if the selected candidate loses their studentship or job, they are expected to stand down from the ...


1

No. There may be places - usually smaller, family businesses - where that may be the case, but for the vast majority of businesses a small percentage of hires are from internal referrals. Whoever is telling you that should probably not be trusted for further career advice.


1

With a background in CS and statistics the tech world will welcome you with open arms. All major internet players (google, facebook, amazon, netflix) make extensive use of A/B-testing and all other types of statistical analysis for market research. I'd be looking for a role as a data scientist in a company with a big user base. EDIT: I wouldn't bother going ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible