6

It all depends on the alternative! In a vacuum, there's nothing wrong with doing a second internship at the same company. I not only did two internships at the same place (one in highschool, one in college) but also did a co-op there as well. However, there are some things to keep in mind: What would you be doing if you didn't apply? If the answer is "...


6

What should I put in the Employer and Supervisor slots? A freelancer is self-employed. Your supervisor is whoever supervises your work. That depends on the particular gig. If the form permits, putting "Self-employed" usually communicates the situation well. If they are looking for references, the parents are the one who supervise your work. Ask ...


5

A PhD in the UK now has strong emphasis on employability outside academia, as we have so many PhDs and nowhere near as many faculty positions. What you, and your potential future employers will be wanting are "transferable skills". For example, giving presentations, independent working, teaching others, writing, ability to learn quickly, networking....


5

There's nothing wrong with applying again if you left a good impression, we had the same intern in two different departments over three years (one month each year). Since every department was satisfied with his work, we would gladly employ him again. Now in your situation it seems you would like to do another month in a different department within the same ...


5

Best thing to do is to just clarify your mistake. If you don't and they find out (and if they contact the HR of that company they will find out), they might think you intentionally lied and your chances will be gone (and you might end up on their blacklist). If you just tell the truth that you made a mistake, they might not really care (everyone makes ...


4

Admittedly, I cannot see why anyone involved in hiring employees would choose a job applicant with a pure math PhD and zero relevant skills/experience over a job applicant with years of relevant skills/experience or with a degree in a more relevant field. Industry won't consider a PhD as equivalent to years of experience. So far as they are concerned, it's ...


2

You seem to be implicitly assuming that 'industy experience' is a single monolithic thing and if you gained it in any company it will be just as useful in any company. This is certainly not the case. No new hire ever has all the skills a company needs right from the start. So if a company compares different candidates for a given position they need to look ...


2

What I would recommend is looking at the websites of the programs, and seeing where their grads end up. Find out how many graduated each year, and how many got what sort of job. As you do this, you should assume that anybody they don't mention did not get a decent job, or the program would be happy to list them. Also, get a count of entries into the program....


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